Gaston Green

Gaston Alfred Green III[1] (born August 1, 1966) is a former professional American football player in the National Football League. He played professionally for the Los Angeles Rams, the Denver Broncos and the Los Angeles Raiders.

Gaston Green
No. 44, 28
Position:Running Back
Personal information
Born:August 1, 1966 (age 52)
Los Angeles, California
Height:5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight:189 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:Gardena High School
College:UCLA
NFL Draft:1988 / Round: 1 / Pick: 14
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing Yards:2,136
Rushing Average:3.9
Rushing Touchdowns:6
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Biography

Green was born in Los Angeles, California. He played prep football at [Gardena High School]] in Los Angeles, California,[2] and played college football at the UCLA.

He was selected by the Los Angeles Rams in the 1st round (14th overall) of the 1988 NFL Draft.[3] He was a 5'10", 189-lb. running back from UCLA. Green played in the NFL for five seasons, from 1988 through 1992.[4] He was a Pro Bowl selection in 1991 as a Bronco, rushing for 1,037 yards.

Green returned to UCLA in 2011 to complete his college degree.[5] Green's 3,731-yard career record at UCLA was surpassed on November 3, 2012 by tailback Johnathan Franklin.

Green and his family live outside of Atlanta, GA.

Statistics

Note: G = Games played; Att = Rushing attempts; Yds = Rushing yards; Avg = Average yards per carry; Long = Longest rush; Rush TD = Rushing touchdowns; Rec = Receptions; Yds = Receiving yards; Avg = Average yards per reception; Long = Longest reception; Rec TD = Receiving touchdowns

Year Team GP Att Yds Avg Long Rush TD Rec Yds Avg Long Rec TD
1988 Los Angeles Rams 10 35 117 3.3 13 0 6 57 9.5 19 0
1989 Los Angeles Rams 6 26 73 2.8 9 0 1 -5 -5.0 -5 0
1990 Los Angeles Rams 15 68 261 3.8 31 0 2 23 11.5 16 1
1991 Denver Broncos 13 261 1,037 4.0 63 4 13 78 6.0 13 0
1992 Denver Broncos 14 161 648 4.0 67 2 10 79 7.9 33 0
1993 Los Angeles Raiders 0 - - - - - - - - - -
Career Totals 58 551 2,136 3.9 67 6 32 232 7.2 33 1
  • Stats that are highlighted show career high

References

  1. ^ [1], ESPN.com, Pat Forde
  2. ^ "Gaston Green". databaseFootball.com. Archived from the original on October 7, 2012. Retrieved December 3, 2012.
  3. ^ "Gaston Green". Pro-Football-Reference.Com. Retrieved December 3, 2012.
  4. ^ "Gaston Green". NFL Enterprises LLC. Retrieved December 3, 2012.
  5. ^ "An Interview With Gaston Green". UCLA Bruins.com. Archived from the original on February 5, 2013. Retrieved December 3, 2012.

External links

1984 UCLA Bruins football team

The 1984 UCLA Bruins football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their ninth year under head coach Terry Donahue, the Bruins compiled a 9–3 record (5–2 Pac-10), finished in a tie for third place in the Pacific-10 Conference, and were ranked #9 in the final AP Poll. The Bruins went on to defeat Miami in the 1985 Fiesta Bowl. Gaston Green and James Washington were named the offensive and defensive most valuable players in the 1985 Fiesta Bowl.

UCLA's offensive leaders in 1984 were quarterback Steve Bono with 1,333 passing yards, running back Danny Andrews with 605 rushing yards, and wide receiver Mike Sherrard with 635 receiving yards.

1985 Fiesta Bowl

The 1985 Fiesta Bowl, played on January 1, 1985, was the 14th edition of the Fiesta Bowl. The game featured the UCLA Bruins, and the Miami Hurricanes. The game was the fourth highest scoring Fiesta Bowl of all time. Miami was defending national champions, playing with four losses under new head coach Jimmy Johnson.

1985 UCLA Bruins football team

The 1985 UCLA Bruins football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their tenth year under head coach Terry Donahue, the Bruins compiled a 9–2–1 record (6–2 Pac-10), finished in first place in the Pacific-10 Conference, and were ranked #7 in the final AP Poll. The Bruins went on to defeat Iowa in the 1986 Rose Bowl. Running back Eric Ball was selected as the most valuable player in the 1986 Rose Bowl.

UCLA's offensive leaders in 1985 were quarterback David Norrie with 1,819 passing yards, running back Gaston Green with 712 rushing yards, and wide receiver Karl Dorrell with 565 receiving yards.

1986 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1986 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1986 college football season.

1986 Freedom Bowl

The 1986 Freedom Bowl was a college football bowl game played on December 30, 1986. It was the third Freedom Bowl Game. The UCLA Bruins defeated the BYU Cougars 31–10. UCLA tailback Gaston Green was named the Player Of The Game. He ran for a record 266 yards, second only at the time to Curtis Dickey who ran for 276 in the 1978 Hall of Fame Classic. This is still the Pac-10 record for most rushing yards in a bowl game, and fourth highest in NCAA bowl history.

1986 Rose Bowl

The 1986 Rose Bowl was a college football bowl game played on January 1, 1986. It was the 72nd Rose Bowl Game. The UCLA Bruins defeated the Iowa Hawkeyes 45-28. UCLA tailback Eric Ball was named the Rose Bowl Player Of The Game. He ran for a Rose Bowl record four touchdowns.

1986 UCLA Bruins football team

The 1986 UCLA Bruins football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their 11th year under head coach Terry Donahue, the Bruins compiled an 8–3–1 record (5–2–1 Pac-10), finished in a tie for second place in the Pacific-10 Conference, and were ranked #12 in the final AP Poll. The Bruins went on to defeat BYU in the 1986 Freedom Bowl. On November 1, 1986, UCLA's defense scored three touchdowns against Oregon State.UCLA's offensive leaders in 1986 were quarterback Matt Stevens with 1,869 passing yards, running back Gaston Green with 1,405 rushing yards, and wide receiver Flipper Anderson with 675 receiving yards.

1987 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1987 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1987 college football season.

1987 UCLA Bruins football team

The 1987 UCLA Bruins football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their 12th year under head coach Terry Donahue, the Bruins compiled a 10–2 record (7–1 Pac-10), finished in a tie for first place in the Pacific-10 Conference, and were ranked #9 in the final AP Poll. The team's sole losses were against #2-ranked Nebraska (33-42) and USC (13-17). The Bruins went on to defeat Florida in the 1987 Aloha Bowl.UCLA's offensive leaders in 1987 were quarterback Troy Aikman with 2,527 passing yards, running back Gaston Green with 1,098 rushing yards, and wide receiver Flipper Anderson with 903 receiving yards.

1987 USC Trojans football team

The 1987 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first year under head coach Larry Smith, the Trojans compiled an 8–4 record (7–1 against conference opponents), won the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 321 to 229.The Trojans lost their inaugural game of Larry Smith's tenure to Michigan State in the first night game ever played at Spartan Stadium. USC secured a Rose Bowl berth by tying UCLA for the Pacific-10 championship and winning the head to head match. They faced Michigan State again, and lost 17–20.

Quarterback Rodney Peete led the team in passing, completing 197 of 332 passes for 2,709 yards with 21 touchdowns and 12 interceptions. Steven Webster led the team in rushing with 239 carries for 1,109 yards and six touchdowns. Erik Affholter led the team in receiving yards with 44 catches for 640 yards and four touchdowns.

1988 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1988 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 51st season in the National Football League, their 41st overall, and their 43rd in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The team improved on a disappointing 6–9 record the previous year, going 10–6 and qualifying as a Wild Card before losing to the Minnesota Vikings in the NFC Wild Card game.

1988 Rose Bowl

The 1988 Rose Bowl was a college football bowl game played on January 1, 1988. It was the 74th Rose Bowl Game. The Michigan State Spartans defeated the USC Trojans 20–17 in a bowl rematch that was much closer than the 27-13 Spartan victory in the regular season. Michigan State Linebacker Percy Snow was named the Rose Bowl Player Of The Game. This was the last Rose Bowl game televised by NBC Sports, ending a 37-year partnership. ABC Sports picked up rights to broadcast the game the following year.

1992 Denver Broncos season

The 1992 Denver Broncos season was the team's 33rd year in professional football and its 23rd with the National Football League (NFL).

1992 Pro Bowl

The 1992 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 42nd annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1991 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 2, 1992, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,209. The final score was NFC 21, AFC 15.Dan Reeves of the Denver Broncos led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Detroit Lions head coach Wayne Fontes. The referee was Gerald Austin.Michael Irvin of the Dallas Cowboys was the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1996 London Monarchs season

The 1996 London Monarchs season was the fourth season for the franchise in the World League of American Football (WLAF). The team was led by head coach Bobby Hammond in his second year and interim head coach Lionel Taylor. The Monarchs played their home games at Wembley Stadium, White Hart Lane and Stamford Bridge in London, England. They finished the regular season in fifth place with a record of four wins and six losses.

Gardena High School

Gardena High School, known as GHS, is a public high school in Harbor Gateway, Los Angeles, California, United States, adjacent to the City of Gardena. It serves grades 9 through 12 and is a part of the Los Angeles Unified School District.

List of UCLA Bruins bowl games

This is a list of UCLA Bruins bowl games. The UCLA Bruins football team has played in 35 bowl games in its history, compiling a record of 16–19–1. From 1946 to 1974, no team could participate in the Rose Bowl two years in a row. This is why the 1954 team, which won the conference, did not participate in the 1955 Rose Bowl.

Little Hallingbury

Little Hallingbury is a small village and a civil parish in the Uttlesford district of Essex, England.

UCLA Bruins football statistical leaders

The UCLA Bruins football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the UCLA Bruins football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Bruins represent the University of California, Los Angeles in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference.

Although UCLA began competing in intercollegiate football in 1919, these lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1919, seasons have increased from 8 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Bruins have played in 11 bowl games since this decision, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

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