Gary Zimmerman

Gary Wayne Zimmerman (born December 13, 1961) is a former American football offensive lineman in the National Football League.[1] Zimmerman played for the Minnesota Vikings from 1986 to 1992 and for the Denver Broncos from 1993 to 1997.[2] He won Super Bowl XXXII with the Broncos against the Green Bay Packers. He was selected to the Pro Bowl seven times and was an All-Pro selection eight times. He attended Walnut High School and the University of Oregon whereby he was inducted into the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 2002.[3]

Gary Zimmerman
No. 65
Position:Tackle
Personal information
Born:December 13, 1961 (age 57)
Fullerton, California
Career information
High school:Walnut (CA)
College:Oregon
Supplemental draft:1984 / Round: 1
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:184
Games started:169
Fumble recoveries:4
Player stats at NFL.com

Professional career

Los Angeles Express

In 1984, Zimmerman was drafted in the second round (36th overall) by the Los Angeles Express in the 1984 USFL Collegiate Draft.[4] He subsequently signed with the Express on February 13, 1984 and went on to play in 17 games that season, starting all 17 at left tackle. His Express teammate was future Pro Football Hall of Famer, QB Steve Young. The Express lost in the USFL Semi-Finals to the Arizona Wranglers to end a 10-8 regular season. In 1985, Zimmerman suited up again with the Express, playing in 18 games (starting 17) with a 3-15 club that ended up out of the USFL playoff picture.[5]

Minnesota Vikings

After the USFL folded in August 1986, Zimmerman joined the Minnesota Vikings after they obtained his rights from the New York Giants who drafted him in the 1984 NFL Supplemental Draft of USFL and CFL Players.[6]

During his time in the NFL, Zimmerman was famous for his refusal to interact with the media. This disdain for the sports press came about due to an early incident in his NFL career, after comments made by Zimmerman condemning the Vikings offensive players for a loss were made public by the media. Zimmerman claimed that his teammates ostracized him for speaking ill of his teammates performance; this led Zimmerman to decide to boycott the sports media as a result, refusing to do interviews or engage in any sort of interaction with them for the rest of his career.[7]

Denver Broncos

Zimmerman ultimately left the Vikings for the Broncos in 1993, and stayed with the team from 1993-1997.[8] He would be part of the team's first Super Bowl-winning squad, winning the game in 1997 and was "in spirit" for the 1998 season. Arriving as the veteran player in 1993 to an offense that was made up of mostly rookies, Zimmerman became the de facto leader of the Broncos offensive line; off the field, Zimmerman forced his fellow players to join him in shunning the media, a policy that would remain in effect until his retirement in 1997.

He played in 184 NFL games, starting 169 of them.[9]

On February 2, 2008, he was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[10]

Zimmerman joins Reggie White, Steve Young, Jim Kelly, Marv Levy, George Allen, Bill Polian, and Sid Gillman as former USFL/AFL league members who are enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[11]

References

  1. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/Z/ZimmGa00.htm
  2. ^ http://www.nfl.com/player/garyzimmerman/2503860/profile
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 13, 2012. Retrieved May 4, 2012.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on June 18, 2012. Retrieved May 4, 2012.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ http://www.usfl.info/express/
  6. ^ http://www.profootballhof.com/history/release.aspx?release_id=1456
  7. ^ http://www.profootballhof.com/assets/media/Zimmerman_Gary.pdf
  8. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/Z/ZimmGa00.htm
  9. ^ http://www.nfl.com/player/garyzimmerman/2503860/profile
  10. ^ http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.aspx?PlayerId=259
  11. ^ http://www.profootballhof.com/default.aspx

External links

1983 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1983 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1983 college football season.

1986 All-Pro Team

The 1986 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1986. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1986 the AP chose two defensive tackles (one a nose-tackle) rather than two defensive tackles and one nose tackles as they had done since 1981. The Pro Football Writers Association returned to a 4-3 format for their 1986 defense.

1986 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1986 Minnesota Vikings season was the franchise's 26th season in the National Football League. After Bud Grant's departure following the 1985 season, offensive coordinator Jerry Burns was promoted to be the team's fourth head coach.

The Vikings finished with a record of nine wins and seven losses.

1987 All-Pro Team

The 1987 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1987. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1987 NEA went with a 3-4 format for their All-Pro defense.

1988 All-Pro Team

The 1988 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1988. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1988 the Associated Press did not choose a kick returner.

1989 All-Pro Team

The 1989 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1989. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

1992 All-Pro Team

The 1992 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1992. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1992 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1993 All-Pro Team

The 1993 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1993. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1993 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1995 All-Pro Team

The 1995 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1995. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1995 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice which continued through 2008. In 1995 all three All-pro teams returned to a 4-3 defense, picking only one middle linebacker.

1996 All-Pro Team

The 1996 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1996. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1996 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 1996 the AP added a new position, that of "Fullback", a primarily blocking position.

1996 Denver Broncos season

The 1996 Denver Broncos season was the franchise's 27th season in the National Football League, and the 37th overall. The Broncos finished the season with 13 wins and 3 losses, winning the AFC West and earning the top seed in the AFC Playoffs. They were defeated, however, by a score of 30–27 by the 9–7 Jacksonville Jaguars in the Divisional round. John Elway says that the Jaguars loss was probably the most embarrassing loss of his career up to that point, because they were the top seeded team in the NFL and were favored to win the Super Bowl by many.

1996 Pro Bowl

The 1996 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1995 season. The game was played on February 4, 1996, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 20, AFC 13. Jerry Rice of the San Francisco 49ers was named the game's Most Valuable Player after he had 2 clutch catches, including the final one which won the game. He finished with six catches for 82 yards.

The attendance for the game was 50,034. The coaches were Mike Holmgren of the Green Bay Packers and Ted Marchibroda of the Indianapolis Colts. The referee was Tom White.

Denver Broncos

The Denver Broncos are a professional American football franchise based in Denver, Colorado. The Broncos compete as a member club of the National Football League (NFL)'s American Football Conference (AFC) West division. They began play in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL) and joined the NFL as part of the merger in 1970. The Broncos are owned by the Pat Bowlen trust and currently play home games at Broncos Stadium at Mile High (formerly known as Invesco Field at Mile High from 2001–2010 and Sports Authority Field at Mile High from 2011–2017). Prior to that, they played at Mile High Stadium from 1960 to 2000.

The Broncos were barely competitive during their 10-year run in the AFL and their first seven years in the NFL. They did not complete a winning season until 1973. In 1977, four years later, they qualified for the playoffs for the first time in franchise history and advanced to Super Bowl XII. Since 1975, the Broncos have become one of the NFL's most successful teams, having suffered only seven losing seasons. They have won eight AFC Championships (1977, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1997, 1998, 2013, 2015), and three Super Bowl championships (1997 (XXXII), 1998 (XXXIII), 2015 (50)), and share the NFL record for most Super Bowl losses (5 — tied with the New England Patriots). They have nine players in the Pro Football Hall of Fame: John Elway, Floyd Little, Shannon Sharpe, Gary Zimmerman, Willie Brown, Tony Dorsett, Terrell Davis, Brian Dawkins, Champ Bailey.

List of NFL supplemental draft picks

There have been 45 players selected in the National Football League supplemental draft since its inception in 1977. The supplemental draft was enacted in 1977 for players who had various circumstances affect their eligibility and did not enter the main NFL draft. The only player selected in the supplemental draft to enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame was Cris Carter, who was selected in 1987 and elected to the Hall of Fame in 2013. In addition, there have been eight players selected to Pro Bowls in their careers: Bernie Kosar (drafted in 1985), Cris Carter (1987), Bobby Humphrey (1989), Rob Moore (1990), Mike Wahle (1998), Jamal Williams (1998), Ahmad Brooks (2006), and Josh Gordon (2012).

In 1984, the National Football League held a supplemental draft for college seniors who had already signed with either the United States Football League or the Canadian Football League. On June 5 in New York City, the draft was completed in an attempt to head off a bidding war in its own ranks for USFL and CFL players. Three players in this draft entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame: Steve Young, Gary Zimmerman, and Reggie White.

List of people from Bend, Oregon

The following is a partial list of notable residents, past and present, from Bend, Oregon, a city in Central Oregon in the western part of the United States of America. A separate list of people from Oregon is available.

Broda Otto Barnes, physician, hypothyroidism researcher

Shannon Bex, member of the musical group Danity Kane

Mohini Bhardwaj, Olympic gymnast

Drew Bledsoe, former NFL quarterback

Ian Boswell, racing cyclist for Team Sky

Allie Brosh, author, Hyperbole and a Half

Pat Cashman, comedian, television and radio personality

John Chambers, CEO of Cisco Corporation; part-time resident

Ray W. Clough, Professor Emeritus at UC-Berkeley, founder of the finite element method

Kent Couch, lawn-chair balloonist

Adam Craig, professional mountain bike racer and Olympian

Kiki Cutter, Olympic and World Cup ski champion

Thomas Del Ruth (1942–), cinematographer

Ashton Eaton, 2012 and 2016 Olympic gold medalist, world record holder in both the decathlon and heptathlon

Alan Embree, former Major League Baseball player

Myrlie Evers-Williams, civil rights activist

Ben Ferguson, professional snowboarder

Jon Fogarty, professional race car driver currently with GAINSCO/Bob Stallings Racing

Tommy Ford, professional ski racer and Olympian

Matthew Fox, television actor on the series Lost

Michael Garrison, electronic musician

Jere Gillis, former NHL player

Scott Goldblatt, 2000 Olympic silver medalist, 2004 Olympic gold medalist in swimming

Paul Hait, Olympic gold medalist

Ray Hatton, college professor, author, and long-distance runner

Chris Horner, pro road racing cyclist, winner of the 2013 Vuelta a España

Steve House, mountain climber, first non-European winner of Piolet d'Or Award

Stan Humphries, former NFL quarterback

Dave Hunt, founder of the Berean Call ministry

Sara Jackson-Holman, singer-songwriter

Jason Keep, basketball player

Donald M. Kerr, conservationist and founder of the High Desert Museum

Rustin R. Kimsey, Episcopalian bishop

Phil Knight, current chairman and former CEO of Nike; seasonal resident

Gary Lewis, outdoor writer for ESPN, author and TV host

Ryan Longwell, NFL place kicker

Gerry Lopez, Hawaiian surfing legend and film actor ("Conan the Barbarian")

Robert D. Maxwell, Medal of Honor recipient

Donald L. McFaul, U.S. Navy SEAL killed in Panama in 1989

Jourdan Miller, fashion model and winner of America's Next Top Model, cycle 20

Chino Moreno, musician and lead singer of Deftones

William A. Niskanen, former Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Reagan administration; former Chairman of the Cato Institute

Paul Phillips, professional poker player

George P. Putnam, publisher; husband of Amelia Earhart

Jeremy Roloff, TV personality, Little People Big World

Beckie Scott, 2002 Olympic gold medalist in cross country skiing

John Spence, first American combat frogman

David Stoliar, sole survivor of the Struma disaster

Conrad Stoltz, three-time XTERRA off-road triathlon champion

Byron A. Stover, businessman and state legislator

Mickey Tettleton, former Major League Baseball player

Andy Tillman, llama rancher, businessman, and author

Ryan Trebon, professional mountain bike and cyclocross racer

April Genevieve Tucholke, novelist

Andreas Wecker, Olympic horizontal bar gold medalist in 1998

Gary Zimmerman, NFL player, inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame in 2008

List of people from Fullerton, California

Here follows a list of people from Fullerton, California; that is, of persons born in or who have spent a significant portion of their life in Fullerton, California.

Paul Abbott, baseball pitcher

Dick Ackerman, politician

The Adolescents

Agent Orange (band)

Alfie Agnew, mathematician, songwriter and musician

Frank Agnew, songwriter and musician

Rikk Agnew, songwriter and musician

Ed Amelung, baseball player

David Boies, attorney

Jackson Browne, folk music singer-songwriter, graduated from Sunny Hills High School

Shaun Butler, BMX rider

James Cameron, Oscar-winning film director

Gary Carter, baseball player, member of MLB Hall of Fame, attended Sunny Hills High School

Kim Chambers

Sam L. Collins, politician

Kevin Costner, actor and Oscar-winning director, graduate of California State University, Fullerton

Suzanne Crough, actress

Dennis Danell, musician

William E. Dannemeyer, politician

Philip K. Dick, author, science fiction

Viet D. Dinh, assistant U.S. Attorney General under George W. Bush

Hector Dyer

Jim Edmonds, baseball player

Leo Fender, inventor, guitar manufacturer

C.S. Forester, novelist

Jeremy Gable, playwright

James Harder, engineer, professor

Jenna Haze

Chris Hebert, actor

Lynn Hill, competitive rock climber

D. J. Houlton, baseball player who currently plays for Yomiuri Giants in Japan

Wesley Jansen, actor

Randy Jones, baseball pitcher

Dan Kennedy, soccer player

Chuck Knipp

Kourtney Kunichika, professional ice hockey player for the Buffalo Beauts of the NWHL

Tommy Lasorda, Hall of Fame baseball manager and Dodgers executive, lives in Fullerton

Leon Leyson, believed to be the youngest member of the Schindlerjuden who were saved from the Holocaust by Oskar Schindler

Lit (band)

Michael McDonald

Mike Ness, musician

Phil Nevin, baseball player

David Newhan, baseball player

Lon Nol, former president of Khmer Republic

Jory Prum, recording engineer

John Raitt, Broadway, television, and film actor and singer

Shawn Ray, bodybuilder

Brian St. Clair, drummer for Local H, was raised in Fullerton, California

Jack Salveson, baseball player

Steven Seagal, actor

Social Distortion

Jeff Soto, contemporary artist

Gwen Stefani, singer and television personality

Skip Stellrecht, actor

John Sullivan, football player

Jeff Tam, baseball player

Kelly Thomas, homeless man beaten to death by the Fullerton Police Department

Tui St. George Tucker

Überzone

Keith Van Horn, basketball player

Arky Vaughan, Hall of Fame baseball player

John Witt (Ballhawk)

Mike Witt, baseball pitcher

Eric Wynalda, soccer player

Gary Zimmerman, football player

National Football League 1990s All-Decade Team

The NFL 1990s All-Decade Team was chosen by voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The team was composed of outstanding performers in the National Football League in the 1990s.The squad consists of first- and second-team offensive, defensive and special teams units, as well as a first- and second-team head coaches. Only a person's performance in the 1990s was used as criteria for voting.Bruce Matthews, Jerry Rice, Barry Sanders, Bruce Smith and Reggie White were unanimous choices. Deion Sanders and Mel Gray were the only players to make the team at two positions. Sanders was named first-team cornerback and punt returner while Gray made the second team as both a kick and punt returner. Morten Andersen, Gary Anderson, Sean Landeta, Ronnie Lott, Gary Zimmerman, Rice, Bruce Smith, and White were first named to the 1980s All-Decade Team. Larry Allen, Warren Sapp, and Willie Roaf were also named to the 2000s All-Decade Team.

The River of Dreams

"The River of Dreams" is a song by American musician Billy Joel. It is the title track and first single from his 1993 album River of Dreams. The song was a hit, peaking at number 3 on the United States and UK charts, making it Joel's highest charting of the 1990s (River of Dreams was the only album he released during the 1990s). It also hit the top spot in Australia and on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart. The song was produced by Joe Nicolo and Danny Kortchmar.

At least four versions of the song have been recorded and released. Two versions (released years later) include a bridge section containing a piano interlude paralleling Joel's melody from his song "Lullabye (Goodnight My Angel)," which is from the same album. These versions can be found on the boxed sets My Lives and Complete Hits Collection: 1973-1999 - but even these versions differ from each other, both in length and in arrangement: one, for instance, has more percussion. A fourth mix appears as a bonus cut on the UK CD single of "River of Dreams" — the "percapella mix" done by Nicolo.

"The River of Dreams" was nominated for the Grammy Award for Record of the Year in 1994, but lost out to "I Will Always Love You" by Whitney Houston. Joel performed the song at the ceremony, and abruptly stopped in the middle of his performance in order to verbally protest Frank Sinatra's lifetime achievement speech being cut off earlier in the night.In 1993, Gary Zimmerman, a songwriter from Long Island, New York, attempted to sue Joel for ten million dollars, claiming more than half of "River Of Dreams" was based on his 1986 song "Nowhere Land." Joel claimed he had no knowledge of Zimmerman or his music, and Zimmerman dropped the lawsuit in 1994.

Walnut High School

Walnut High School is located in Walnut, California among the San Jose Hills of the San Gabriel Valley in Southern California. Ranked in the top 100 high schools in America by the Daily Beast Publication - it is also located within the prestigious Walnut Valley Unified School District which has also been ranked by numerous sources to be one of the top public school districts in all of Southern California. The school is a two-time National Blue Ribbon School (1992–93 and 1997–98), six-time California Distinguished school (1991, 1992, 1994, 1998, 2005 and 2009), and a California Gold Ribbon School (2017). Walnut High School has also offered the International Baccalaureate program since 1999.

Offense
Defense
Offense
Defense
Special teams
Quarterbacks
Running backs
Wide receivers /
ends
Tight ends
Offensive
linemen
Pre-modern era
two-way players
Defensive
linemen
Linebackers
Defensive backs
Placekickers
and punters
Coaches
Contributors

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.