Gary Knafelc

Gary Knafelc (born January 2, 1932) is a former American football player, a wide receiver / tight end in the National Football League for ten seasons, primarily with the Green Bay Packers.[1] He played one game at the start of his career with the Chicago Cardinals and his final season was with the San Francisco 49ers.

Born and raised in Pueblo, Colorado, Knafelc graduated from its Central High School in 1950 and played college football at the University of Colorado in Boulder under head coach Dal Ward.[2]

He was the fourteenth overall selection of the 1954 NFL draft, taken by the Chicago Cardinals, who traded him early that season to the Green Bay Packers. Knafelc is the only player to ever be carried off the City Stadium or Lambeau Field turf by fans. That happened after he caught an 18-yard touchdown pass from Tobin Rote in the final minute to beat the Detroit Lions, 20–17, in the 1955 season opener on September 25.[1][2][3][4][5]

Knafelc was a member of Vince Lombardi's first two NFL title teams in 1961 and 1962, and was inducted into the Packers Hall of Fame in 1976. He was the public address announcer for Packers games at Lambeau Field from 1964 until 2004, when he was succeeded by Bill Jartz of WBAY-TV.

Gary Knafelc
No. 84
Position:Wide Receiver / Tight End
Personal information
Born:January 2, 1932 (age 87)
Pueblo, Colorado
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:217 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:Pueblo (CO) Central
College:Colorado
NFL Draft:1954 / Round: 2 / Pick: 14
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ a b Hendricks, Martin (October 15, 2013). "Former tight end Gary Knafelc also worked as the PA announcer at Lambeau Field". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved March 1, 2016.
  2. ^ a b Moss, Irv (July 24, 2013). "Colorado Classics: Gary Knafelc, former CU Buffs star". Denver Post. Retrieved March 1, 2016.
  3. ^ Lea, Bud (September 26, 1955). "Packers surprise Lions, 20-17". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 3, part 2.
  4. ^ Johnson, Chuck (September 26, 1955). "Packers upset Detroit, 20-17, on last minute touchdown". Milwaukee Journal. p. 13, part 2.
  5. ^ "Packers upset Detroit, 20-17, on last minute touchdown". Packer History. September 25, 1955. Retrieved March 1, 2016.

External links

1953 All-Big Seven Conference football team

The 1953 All-Big Seven Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Seven Conference teams for the 1953 college football season. The selectors for the 1953 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press (UP). Players selected as first-team honorees by both the AP and UP are displayed in bold.

1953 Colorado Buffaloes football team

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