Gary Fencik

John Gary Fencik (born June 11, 1954) is a former professional American-football free safety and an executive with Adams Street Partners.[1] Fencik played 12 seasons with the Chicago Bears and is their all-time leader in interceptions[2] and total tackles.

Gary Fencik
No. 45
Position:Safety
Personal information
Born:June 11, 1954 (age 64)
Chicago, Illinois
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:194 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High school:Barrington (IL)
College:Yale
NFL Draft:1976 / Round: 10 / Pick: 281
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Tackles:1,102
Interceptions:38
Touchdowns:1
INT yards:488
Player stats at NFL.com

Playing career

He played college football at Yale University, where he received his bachelor's degree in 1976. In 1985, he received an MBA from Northwestern University. John Madden once said in a broadcast that "Gary Fencik played football at Yale; that is like saying clean dirt".

Fencik was originally drafted by the Miami Dolphins in the tenth round of the 1976 NFL Draft, with the 281st overall selection. After rupturing his left lung in a preseason game against the New Orleans Saints, he was released in September and picked up by the Bears.[3]

In Chicago, he was the team's defensive captain through the 1980s including the 1985 Super Bowl championship season. He made two Pro Bowl appearances (1980, 1981). He was also awarded a gold record and a platinum video award for the 1985 Super Bowl Shuffle. Fencik and Doug Plank were dubbed "The Hit Men", a fact referenced by Fencik in The Super Bowl Shuffle.[4]

In September 1986 he was featured on the cover of GQ magazine. His picture also appeared on the reverse side of a Playboy centerfold, showing him and the December 1982 Playmate Charlotte Kemp, shopping at the Old Town Art Fair.[5]

Fencik finished his career with 38 interceptions, which he returned for 488 yards and a touchdown. He also recorded 2 sacks and recovered 14 fumbles, returning them for 65 yards.

Retirement

Following his football career, Fencik has worked in the finance industry. Before joining Adams Street Partners in 1995, Fencik worked with Wells Fargo and UBS. He has also worked as a sports commentator, mainly on WGN radio where he was a color commentator on Bears radio broadcasts from 1990–1993. During the 1988 NFL season he paired with James Brown as an NFL television commentator on CBS.

He has two children, Garrison and Evan.

References

  1. ^ "Executive Committee". ADAMS STREET PARTNERS. Retrieved August 10, 2011.
  2. ^ Mayer, Larry. "Tillman repeats stellar performance". Chicago Bears. Retrieved October 8, 2012.
  3. ^ Rosaforte, Tim (December 2, 1985). "Once a Dolphin, Fencik succeeds as Bears safety". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved May 7, 2019.
  4. ^ Stiernberg, Bonnie; Ryan, Shane (January 30, 2015). "The Super Bowl Shuffle: A GIF-Heavy Ranking of Every Verse". Paste. Retrieved May 7, 2019.
  5. ^ Telander, Rick (September 30, 1985). "Pride of the Yuppies". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved May 7, 2019.
1975 Yale Bulldogs football team

The 1975 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. The Bulldogs were led by eleventh year head coach Carmen Cozza, played their home games at the Yale Bowl and finished in third place in the Ivy League with a 5–2 record, 7–2 overall.On November 22, 1975, Harvard and Yale entered "The Game" tied for first place with identical 5–1 records. The game was played at the Yale Bowl in front of 66,846 spectators. Yale took a 7–0 lead on a five-yard option run by quarterback Stone Phillips (later known for his work as a television news reporter). Harvard rallied with 10 points in the second half to win the game and become the 1975 Ivy League champion.The team's statistical leaders included Stone Phillips with 969 passing yards, halfback Don Gesicki with 873 rushing yards and 42 points scored, and split end Gary Fencik (who later played 12 years in the NFL) with 729 receiving yards.Linebacker John Smoot was the team captain and also received the Ted Blair Award as the team's most valuable player. Eight Yale players received first-team All-Ivy honors: Fencik, Gesicki, Smoot, defensive end Scott Keller, offensive tackle Charlie Palmer, offensive guard Victor Staffieri, punter Mike Southworth, and MB John Cahill.One Yale player was selected in the 1976 NFL Draft: Gary Fencik by the Miami Dolphins in the 10th round, 281st overall pick.

1976 Chicago Bears season

The 1976 Chicago Bears season was their 57th regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 7–7 record, in their second season under Jack Pardee. The .500 record and second-place finish were the team's best since 1968. This was also the first season for the Chicago Honey Bears, the team's official cheerleading squad.

1979 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1979. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that were included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1979.

1980 All-Pro Team

The 1980 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1980. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. Pro Football Weekly chose a nose tackle due to the proliferation of 3-4 defenses in the NFL. They, and The Sporting News chose two inside linebackers.

1981 All-Pro Team

The 1981 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1981. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Associated Press added a "nose tackle" position in 1981, joining Pro Football Weekly .

1981 Chicago Bears season

The 1981 Chicago Bears season was their 62nd regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–10 record under fourth year coach Neill Armstrong, who was fired at the end of the season.

1981 Pro Bowl

The 1981 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 31st annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1980 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 1, 1981, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 21, AFC 7.Sam Rutigliano of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Atlanta Falcons head coach Leeman Bennett. The referee was Gordon McCarter.

1982 All-Pro Team

The 1982 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League (NFL) players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly in 1982. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Sporting News did not choose a 1982 All-Pro team due to the players' strike.

1982 Chicago Bears season

The 1982 Chicago Bears season was their 63rd regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 3–6 record under first year head coach Mike Ditka in a strike shortened season.

The strike also prevented the Bears–Packers rivalry from being played this year, making the Lions–Packers rivalry the longest-running annual series in the league.

1983 Chicago Bears season

The 1983 Chicago Bears season was their 64th regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–8 record under second year head coach Mike Ditka, but missed postseason play. Jim McMahon was the quarterback, who completed 175 of 295 pass attempts. The Bears 1983 NFL Draft class was ranked #3 in NFL Top 10's greatest draft classes.

1985 All-Pro Team

The 1985 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News in 1985. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

Pro Football Weekly, which suspended operations in 1985, did not choose an All-Pro team.

1987 Chicago Bears season

The 1987 Chicago Bears season was their 68th regular season and 18th post-season completed in the National Football League. The club was looking to return to the playoffs, win the NFC Central Division for the fourth consecutive year and avenge their loss in the Divisional Playoffs to the Washington Redskins the year before when the team finished 14–2.

The Bears' record fell off slightly, with the team finishing at 11–4 in the strike-shortened season. Their record was once again good enough for the division title and the #2 seed in the conference, as the team had done the year before. The team also saw the same result as 1986 as the Bears suffered a second consecutive loss to the Redskins, who went on to win Super Bowl XXII, in the Divisional Playoffs.

1988 Green Bay Packers season

The 1988 Green Bay Packers season was their 70th season overall and their 68th in the National Football League (NFL). Under coach Lindy Infante, the club had their second 4–12 in three seasons, finishing last place in the NFC Central division. 1988 was the first season the Packers played under Infante.

Kenny Hill (defensive back)

Kenneth Wayne "Kenny" Hill (born July 25, 1958 in Oak Grove, Louisiana) is a former National Football League player whose career lasted ten seasons, from 1980 until 1989. Hill played for the Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders, New York Giants, and Kansas City Chiefs and earned three Super Bowl rings, the first two with the 1980 and 1983 Raiders, the third with the 1986 New York Giants. Hill is the first and only Ivy League football athlete to have played on three Super Bowl championship teams.

Hill played college football at Yale University, coached by College Football Hall of Fame member Carmen Cozza. Hill lettered three years, amassing 1594 rushing yards on 356 carries. He gained 910 yards rushing his junior year and returned kickoffs and punts on special teams during three varsity seasons. Hill was named to the 1979 All-Ivy League First Team and 1978 All-Ivy League Second Team.Hill majored in Molecular Biophysics and Biophysics.Hill had signed a letter of intent to play football at Louisiana State for Charlie McClendon, another member of the College Football Hall of Fame. Hill was recruited by LSU to play defensive back. "I can't blame him for going to Yale. He's very bright," McClendon remarked. Hill turned down football scholarship offers from, among others, the football programs at Baylor, Mississippi, Mississippi State, and Tulane.Hill, a varsity track letterwinner at Yale for Coach Lee Calhoun, had been timed at 4.46 in the forty yard dash, and 9.7 in the 100 yard dash in college. Calhoun thought Hill could run a 9.5 in the 100 if he concentrated on track.[1]

Hill, like former Yale football athletes Don Martin, Dick Jauron and fellow Super Bowl champion Gary Fencik, converted successfully to defensive back in the NFL from running back or wide receiver.

List of Chicago Bears broadcasters

Currently, WBBM NewsRadio 780 airs the Chicago Bears football games with Jeff Joniak doing the play-by-play, along with color commentator Tom Thayer and sideline reporter Zach Zaidman. Over the years, many Bears play-by-play broadcasters have included Jack Brickhouse and Wayne Larrivee. Their current preseason TV announcers on Fox Chicago are Adam Amin or Kyle Brandt (play-by-play), Jim Miller (color commentary) and Lou Canellis (sideline reporter).

List of Chicago Bears team records

The Chicago Bears are a National Football League (NFL) franchise based in Chicago. This article lists all the individual and team statistical records complied since the franchise's birth in 1920.

List of Yale Bulldogs in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Yale Bulldogs football players in the NFL Draft.

List of people from Barrington, Illinois

The following list includes notable people who were born or have lived in Barrington, Illinois. For a similar list organized alphabetically by last name, see the category page People from Barrington, Illinois.

Richie Petitbon

Richard Alvin Petitbon (born April 18, 1938) is a former American football safety and coach. Petitbon first attended Loyola University New Orleans on a track and field scholarship and left after his freshman year to attend Tulane. After playing college football at Tulane, he played for the Chicago Bears from 1959 to 1968, the Los Angeles Rams in 1969 and 1970, and the Washington Redskins in 1971 and 1972. Petitbon recorded the second most interceptions in Bears history with 38 during his career, trailing Gary Fencik. Petitbon also holds the Bears record for the longest interception return, after scoring on a 101-yard return against the Rams in 1962. As of 2019, he also holds the Bears record for the most interceptions in a game (3 against the Green Bay Packers in 1967) and most interception return yards in a season (212 in 1962).He returned to the Redskins in 1978 as secondary coach under Jack Pardee. From 1981 to 1992, he was the Redskins' defensive coordinator under head coach Joe Gibbs, either alone or sharing the job with Larry Peccatiello. During this time period, Petitbon was considered one of the top coordinators in football. When Gibbs initially retired in 1993, Petitbon was named his successor. He did not find the same success as a head coach, lasting only one season. Aging and underachieving, the team finished 4-12 and Petibon was dismissed by Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke in favor of archrival Dallas Cowboys offensive coordinator Norv Turner. Following his firing, Petitbon never took another job in the NFL.

His brother, John Petitbon, also played in the NFL. Both Petitbon brothers are members of the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame and the Louisiana High School Sports Hall of Fame.

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