Gary Famiglietti

Gary J. Famiglietti (November 28, 1913 – July 13, 1986) was a professional American football player who played running back for nine seasons for the Chicago Bears and Boston Yanks. He was born in Medford, Massachusetts and attended college at Boston University. He was drafted in the 3rd round of the 1938 NFL Draft.

Famiglietti's most productive year occurred in 1942. He finished third in the National Football League in rushing yards with a total of 503 and first in rushing touchdowns with a total of 8.

Gary Famiglietti
Position:Fullback / Halfback
Personal information
Born:November 28, 1913
Medford, Massachusetts, United States
Died:July 13, 1986 (aged 72)
Chicago, Illinois
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:225 lb (102 kg)
Career information
High school:Medford (MA)
College:Boston University
NFL Draft:1938 / Round: 3 / Pick: 25
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

External links

1938 NFL Draft

The 1938 National Football League Draft was held on December 12, 1937, at the Hotel Sherman in Chicago, Illinois. The draft consisted of 12 rounds and 110 player selections. It began with the Cleveland Rams, taking Corbett Davis.

1940 NFL Championship Game

The 1940 National Football League Championship Game, sometimes referred to as 73–0, was the eighth title game of the National Football League (NFL), played at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. on December 8, with a sellout capacity attendance of 36,034.The Chicago Bears (8–3) of the Western Division met the Washington Redskins (9–2), champions of the Eastern Division. Neither team had played in the title game since 1937, when the Redskins won a close game at Chicago's Wrigley Field. For this game in Washington, the Bears entered as slight favorites.The Bears scored eleven touchdowns and won 73–0, the most one-sided victory in NFL history. The game was broadcast on radio by Mutual Broadcasting System, the first NFL title game broadcast nationwide.

1942 All-Pro Team

The 1942 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players who were chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team for the 1942 football season. Teams were selected by, among others, the "official" All-Pro team announced by the NFL and selected by a committee of nine reporters (NFL), the Associated Press (AP), the International News Service (INS), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).

1942 National Football League All-Star Game (December)

The 1942 National Football League All-Star Game (December) was the National Football League's fifth all-star game. The game pitted the Washington Redskins, the league's champion for the 1942 season, against a team of all-stars. The game was played on Sunday, December 27, 1942, at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in front of 18,671 fans. The All-Stars defeated the Redskins by a score of 17–14.Due to World War II, the All-Star Game was canceled following 1942 as travel restrictions were imposed. It would not return until 1951 as the Pro Bowl, with the champions vs. all-stars format changed to between divisions to avoid confusion with the Chicago College All-Star Game.

Chicago Bears all-time roster

This list includes all players who have ever been signed or played with the Chicago Bears.

Offseason members, practice squad members, and people who never played a regular season game with the franchise are included and denoted by italics.

People only, or primarily involved in management, front-office, and coaches are denoted by a star (*).

Persons currently under contract with the franchise, or working for it, are indicated in boldface type.

List of Boston University Terriers in the NFL draft

This is a list of Boston University Terriers football players in the NFL draft.

List of National Football League annual rushing touchdowns leaders

This is a season-by-season list of National Football League players who have led the regular season in rushing touchdowns. Although rushing has both an offensive and a defensive meaning, this list charts offensive rushing touchdowns, usually scored by a running back, either a halfback or a fullback.

Record-keeping for rushing touchdowns began in 1932, when Bronko Nagurski of the Chicago Bears led the league with 4 rushing touchdowns. Since then, LaDainian Tomlinson has set the record for rushing touchdowns in a season, when he led the league in 2006, with 28 rushing touchdowns, while playing with the San Diego Chargers. Prior to Tomlinson's setting of the record, Priest Holmes of the Kansas City Chiefs and Shaun Alexander of the Seattle Seahawks, jointly held the record with 27, reaching that mark in 2003 NFL season and 2005, respectively.

Jim Brown holds the record for most league-leading seasons in rushing touchdowns, with 5 (1957, 1958, 1959, 1963, and 1965). Dutch Clark became the first player to lead the league in consecutive seasons (1936 and 1937), although in 1937 he co-led the league. The first sole rushing touchdowns leader in consecutive seasons was Johnny Drake, when he led in 1939 and 1940. Steve Van Buren was the first to lead the league in 3 consecutive seasons, from 1947 to 1949, a figure later matched by Jim Brown (1957 to 1959) and Leroy Kelly (1966 to 1968). Marcus Allen is the only player in NFL history to lead the league in rushing touchdowns while playing with 2 different teams; in 1982, Allen led the league while playing with the Oakland Raiders, and in 1993, he led the league while playing with the Kansas City Chiefs.

In 1943, Bill Paschal became the first NFL player to post a 10+ rushing touchdowns season, when playing for the New York Giants. 40 seasons later, in 1983, John Riggins posted the league's first 20+ rushing touchdowns season. Steve Van Buren was the first player to lead the league with consecutive 10+ rushing touchdowns seasons, in 1947 and 1948; he would add a third consecutive in 1949. Emmitt Smith posted the first consecutive league-leading 20+ rushing touchdowns seasons in 1994 and 1995–an achievement later matched by Priest Holmes, in 2003 and 2004.

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