Gary Cuozzo

Gary Samuel Cuozzo (born April 26, 1941) is a former professional American football player. An undrafted quarterback from the University of Virginia, Cuozzo played in 10 NFL seasons from 1963 to 1972. He began his NFL career on the Baltimore Colts as a backup to Johnny Unitas. When Unitas was injured in 1965, Cuozzo replaced him until getting sidelined by injury as well, forcing coach Don Shula to use running back Tom Matte as an emergency quarterback.

He was traded to the expansion team New Orleans Saints in 1967, where he was the first starting quarterback in the franchise's history. However, the trade was disastrous for New Orleans, which gave away the first overall pick in the 1967 NFL draft to the Colts,[1] who used it to select Michigan State All-American Bubba Smith, who became an All-Pro and was Baltimore's starting left defensive end in Super Bowl III and V.

After losing the Saints' starting job later in 1967 to Billy Kilmer, he was traded to the Minnesota Vikings.[2] He became the Vikings' starting quarterback in 1970 when Joe Kapp, the team's Most Valuable Player in 1969, held out and was traded to the Boston Patriots. Cuozzo was named NFC Player of the Week for leading the Vikings to a 27-10 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in a rematch of Super Bowl IV in the season opener.

The 1970 Vikings posted the NFL's best regular season record at 12-2, but lost in an NFC Divisional playoff game to the San Francisco 49ers at home. In 1971, Cuozzo could not hold on to his starting job, sharing duties with Norm Snead and Bob Lee. The Vikings went 11-3 in the regular season and lost in the divisional playoffs at home to the eventual Super Bowl champion Dallas Cowboys.

After the 1971 season, the Vikings reacquired Fran Tarkenton from the New York Giants, with Snead and the Vikings' leading receiver from 1971, Bob Grim, going to the Big Apple. Tarkenton played his first six seasons (1961-66) in Minnesota, coinciding with the Vikings' first six seasons in the NFL.

Cuozzo was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in the deal which sent fleet wide receiver John Gilliam to the Vikings.[3] Cardinals coach Bob Hollway was familiar with Cuozzo, having served as Minnesota's defensive coordinator under Bud Grant prior to leaving for St. Louis in 1971.

Cuozzo was part of a chaotic four-quarterback rotation with Jim Hart, Pete Beathard, and Tim Van Galder in 1972, but when Don Coryell took over as Cardinals coach in 1973, he named Hart the undisputed starter, and he would hold the job into the 1980s.

Following his retirement in 1973, Cuozzo moved to Middletown Township, New Jersey, to start an orthodontics practice.

In 1990, his oldest son Gary Jr., a/k/a Chip, was murdered in Miami during a drug deal, and Cuozzo gave talks to teens about avoiding drugs. He served as national chairman of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes from 1995 to 1998.[4]

Cuozzo played high school football at Glen Ridge High School in Glen Ridge, New Jersey.[5]

Gary Cuozzo
No. 15
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:April 26, 1941 (age 77)
Montclair, New Jersey
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:195 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High school:Glen Ridge (NJ)
College:Virginia
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TD-INT:43-55
Yards:7,402
QB Rating:62.1
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ "Saints grab Gary Cuozzo in trade with Baltimore". Lawrence Journal-World. Kansas. March 7, 1967. p. 11.
  2. ^ "Vikings get Gary Cuozzo in key trade". Gettysburg Times. Pennsylvania. Associated Press. January 30, 1968. p. 5.
  3. ^ "Vikes trade Cuozzo". Pittsburgh Press. UPI. April 27, 1972. p. 38.
  4. ^ Richard Deutsch, "Gary Cuozzo, Saints Quarterback", Sports Illustrated, July 12, 1999.
  5. ^ Gary Cuozzo player profile Archived 2007-05-16 at the Wayback Machine, database Football. Accessed August 27, 2007.

External links

1962 Virginia Cavaliers football team

The 1962 Virginia Cavaliers football team represented the University of Virginia during the 1962 NCAA University Division football season. The Cavaliers were led by second-year head coach Bill Elias and played their home games at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Virginia. They competed as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, finishing in seventh.

1965 NFL season

The 1965 NFL season was the 46th regular season of the National Football League. The Green Bay Packers won the NFL title after defeating the Cleveland Browns in the championship game, the last before the Super Bowl era.

1967 New Orleans Saints season

The 1967 New Orleans Saints season was the inaugural season for the franchise. The team went 3–11, finishing in last place in the four-team NFL Eastern Conference Capitol Division.

1968 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1968 season was the Minnesota Vikings' eighth in the National Football League. Under head coach Bud Grant, the Vikings won the NFL Central division title with an 8–6 record, and qualified for the postseason for the first time in franchise history. The Vikings' first trip to the playoffs saw them suffer a 24–14 loss in the Western Conference Championship Game to the eventual NFL champion and Super Bowl runner-up Baltimore Colts at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium. In the Playoff Bowl two weeks later, they again lost to the Dallas Cowboys 17–13.

1970 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1970 season was the Minnesota Vikings' 10th in the National Football League and the first season following the AFL–NFL merger. Under head coach Bud Grant, they finished with a 12–2 record and won the first ever NFC Central title before losing to the San Francisco 49ers at home in the NFC Divisional Playoff game. The Vikings' defense became the second defense in the history of the NFL to lead the league in fewest points allowed and fewest total yards allowed for two consecutive seasons.

1971 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1971 Minnesota Vikings season was the franchise's 11th season in the National Football League. The Vikings won the NFC Central title as they finished with a record of 11 wins and three losses, before losing to the eventual Super Bowl champion Dallas Cowboys at home, 20–12, in the NFC Divisional Playoff game.

In 2007, ESPN.com ranked the 1971 Vikings as the fourth-greatest defense in NFL history, saying, "[c]onsidering that their motto was 'Meet at the quarterback,' it's no surprise that the Purple People Eaters held opposing QBs to a 40.4 rating, one of the lowest ever." ESPN also noted that the 1971 Vikings "shut out three opponents, and only one team scored more than 20 points against them. As a result, Alan Page became the first defensive player to ever be named NFL MVP. Carl Eller, Jim Marshall and safety Paul Krause joined Page on the All-Pro team."

1972 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1972 season was the Minnesota Vikings' 12th in the National Football League. It marked the return of Fran Tarkenton to the Vikings after he had been traded to the New York Giants in 1967. In return, Minnesota sent three players to the Giants (Norm Snead, Bob Grim and Vince Clements), plus a first and second round draft choice. Tarkenton's return also led to the previous season's QB, Gary Cuozzo, being traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in a deal which sent wide receiver John Gilliam to the Vikings along with second- and fourth-round draft picks in 1973. Cardinals coach Bob Hollway was familiar with Cuozzo, having served as Minnesota's defensive coordinator under Bud Grant prior to leaving for St. Louis in 1971.

The Vikings finished with a record of seven wins and seven losses and failed to improve on their 11–3 record from 1971. This would be one of only two times during the 1970s in which the Vikings failed to reach the playoffs, as they would win the NFC Central six straight years from 1973–1978 before posting a 7–9 record in 1979. The Vikings started the season with just one win in their first four games, including a surprising 19-17 loss to the lightly-regarded Cardinals in week four, when Gary Cuozzo bested his former team as Vikings kicker Fred Cox hit the upright on a potential game-winning field goal. The team recovered from their slow start, winning five of their next six to sit at 6–4. However, the Vikings would lose three of their final four games to finish the season at an even 7–7.

Bob Berry (American football)

Robert Chadwick "Bob" Berry (born March 10, 1942) is a former American football player, a quarterback in the National Football League for twelve seasons. He was selected to one Pro Bowl in 1969 as a member of the Atlanta Falcons. Berry was a member of three Super Bowl teams with the Minnesota Vikings in the mid-1970s.

Cuozzo

Cuozzo is a surname, and may refer to:

Gary Cuozzo (born 1941), American football player

Steve Cuozzo (born 1950), American writer and editor

Gary Keithley

Gary Keithley (born January 11, 1951) is a former professional American football quarterback in the National Football League. Playing for the St. Louis Cardinals, he had a 0.0 passer rating in each of his first two career starts, the only quarterback in NFL history to do this in back-to-back games. He was the backup quarterback of the BC Lions in 1977 and 1978.

George Shaw (American football)

George Howard Shaw (July 25, 1933 – January 3, 1998) was an American football quarterback who played seven seasons in the National Football League (NFL).

Kelly Holcomb

Bryan Kelly Holcomb (born July 9, 1973) is a former American football quarterback of the National Football League. He was signed by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers as an undrafted free agent in 1995. He played college football at Middle Tennessee State. Holcomb was also a member of the Indianapolis Colts, Cleveland Browns, Buffalo Bills, Philadelphia Eagles and Minnesota Vikings.

Leslie Kelley

Leslie Howard Kelley (born December 9, 1944) is a former American football fullback/linebacker in the National Football League for the New Orleans Saints. He played college football at Alabama and played just 3 seasons in the NFL without ever starting.

He was the first ever draft choice of the Saints, taken with the final pick of the first round in the 1967. The Saints originally had the #1 overall pick in that draft, but traded it to the Baltimore Colts for quarterback Gary Cuozzo. The Colts selected Michigan State All-America defensive end Bubba Smith with the traded pick.

List of Indianapolis Colts starting quarterbacks

The Indianapolis Colts are a professional American football team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. They are currently members of the South Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL).

The club was officially founded in Baltimore, Maryland in 1953, as the Baltimore Colts, replacing a previous team of that name that folded in 1950. After 31 seasons in Baltimore, Colts owner Robert Irsay moved the team to Indianapolis.

The Colts have had 33 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Colts' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee Johnny Unitas, as well as the Associated Press National Football League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) winners Earl Morrall and Bert Jones. Unitas also won the MVP award three times in his career. The franchise's first starting quarterback was Fred Enke, who started 9 games in total for the Colts. The Colts' starting quarterback from 1998 to 2011 was 5-time MVP Peyton Manning. The Colts' current starting quarterback is Andrew Luck.

List of Minnesota Vikings starting quarterbacks

The Minnesota Vikings are a professional American football team based in Minneapolis. They are members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). A franchise was granted to Minneapolis businessmen Bill Boyer, H. P. Skoglund and Max Winter in 1959 as a member of the American Football League (AFL). The ownership forfeited their AFL membership in January 1960 and received the National Football League's 14th franchise on January 28, 1960 that started play in 1961.The Vikings have had 36 starting quarterbacks in the history of their franchise; they have never had more than three starting quarterbacks in one season. The Vikings' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees Fran Tarkenton, Brett Favre and Warren Moon. The team's first starting quarterback was George Shaw; he was replaced by Tarkenton in the franchise's first game, and the future Hall of Famer retained the starting role for most of the remainder of the season. As of the 2018 season, Minnesota's starting quarterback is Kirk Cousins.

Raven Society

The Raven Society is an honor society at the University of Virginia. Founded in 1904 by University student William McCully James, and named in honor of the famous poem by Edgar Allan Poe (who attended UVa in 1826). According to its constitution, one of the Raven Society's main goals is "to bring together the best men in the various departments of the university for mutual acquaintance and for cooperation in their efforts to protect the honor and dignity of the university."In addition to presenting annual Raven Fellowships, the society recognizes students, professors, administrators, and alumni for their "scholarly pursuits and their dedication to University ideals" with the Raven Award; the Award presentation had its beginning in 1933. The Society is also responsible for the upkeep of Poe's living quarters, 13 West Range.The Raven Society has been active in commemorating Poe's life, beginning with a celebration of his centenary in 1909. At this time, the Society first opened Poe's preserved room at 13 West Range, which they had furnished with "a settee from the Allan home in Richmond" as well as "a real raven, stuffed, [which] looked down from a coign of

the room." The Raven Society also celebrated Poe's bicentenary in 2009 by laying three roses and a drink of cognac in 13 West Range.

Notable members of the Raven Society have included founder and UVa Law professor Raleigh C. Minor, University president Frank Hereford, former Alumni Association directors J. Malcolm "Mack" Luck and Gilbert J. Sullivan, University professors Bascom S. Deaver and Ernest Mead, and UVa and Baltimore Colts football player Gary Cuozzo.

Todd Bouman

Todd Matthew Bouman (; born August 1, 1972) is a former American football quarterback. He was signed by the Minnesota Vikings as an undrafted free agent in 1997. He played college football at St. Cloud State. Bouman also played for the New Orleans Saints, Green Bay Packers, Jacksonville Jaguars, St. Louis Rams and Baltimore Ravens.

Tom Matte

Thomas Roland Matte (born June 14, 1939), is a former American football player who played quarterback in college and primarily running back in the National Football League (NFL) in the 1960s and 1970s and earned a Super Bowl Ring. He attended Shaw High School in East Cleveland and is an Eagle Scout. Matte was an All-American back at Ohio State University.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.