Garrett Davis

Garrett Davis (September 10, 1801 – September 22, 1872) was a U.S. Senator and Representative from Kentucky.

Born in Mount Sterling, Kentucky, Garrett Davis was the brother of Amos Davis. After completing preparatory studies, Davis was employed in the office of the county clerk of Montgomery County, Kentucky, and afterward of Bourbon County, Kentucky. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1823, whereafter he commenced practice in Paris, Kentucky.

Davis served in the Kentucky House of Representatives from 1833 to 1835. Afterward, he was elected as a Whig to the United States House of Representatives, serving from March 4, 1839, to March 3, 1847. There he was chairman of the Committee on Territories.

Davis declined to be a candidate for reelection in 1846, but instead resumed the practice of law and also engaged in agricultural pursuits. He refused to reenter politics the next fifteen years. Davis declined the nomination for Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky in 1848 and declined the American Party nomination for Governor in 1855 and for the presidency in 1856.

Davis was opposed to secession, however, and supported the Constitutional Union Party ticket of John Bell and Edward Everett in the 1860 presidential election. This convinced him to reenter politics, and he was elected by a Unionist Party position in 1861 to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the expulsion of John C. Breckinridge. He was reelected as a Democrat in 1867 and served from December 10, 1861, until his death in Paris, Kentucky, in 1872. He served as chairman of the Committee on Private Land Claims. He was interred in Paris Cemetery.

Garrett Davis is the namesake of Davis County, Iowa.[1]

Garrett Davis
Hon. Garrett Davis, Ky - NARA - 528757
United States Senator
from Kentucky
In office
December 10, 1861 – September 22, 1872
Preceded byJohn C. Breckinridge
Succeeded byWillis B. Machen
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 8th district
In office
March 4, 1843 – March 3, 1847
Preceded byJames Sprigg
Succeeded byCharles S. Morehead
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 12th district
In office
March 4, 1839 – March 3, 1843
Preceded byJohn Chambers
Succeeded byDistrict eliminated
Member of the Kentucky House of Representatives
In office
1833–1835
Personal details
BornSeptember 10, 1801
Mount Sterling, Kentucky
DiedSeptember 22, 1872 (aged 71)
Paris, Kentucky
NationalityAmerican
Political partyWhig, Unionist, Democrat
ProfessionPolitician, lawyer

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 101.

References

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
John Chambers
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 12th congressional district

1839–1843 (obsolete district)
Succeeded by
Seat lost to redistricting
Preceded by
James Sprigg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 8th congressional district

1843–1847
Succeeded by
Charles Morehead
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
John C. Breckinridge
U.S. Senator (Class 3) from Kentucky
1861–1872
Served alongside: Lazarus W. Powell, James Guthrie, Thomas C. McCreery, John W. Stevenson
Succeeded by
Willis B. Machen
1801 in the United States

Events from the year 1801 in the United States.

42nd United States Congress

The Forty-second United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1871, to March 4, 1873, during the third and fourth years of Ulysses S. Grant's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Eighth Census of the United States in 1860. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

Amos Davis

Amos Davis (August 15, 1794 – June 11, 1835) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Kentucky. He was born in Mount Sterling, Kentucky, where he completed preparatory studies. Later, he studied law and was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Mount Sterling, Kentucky. He also served as sheriff of Montgomery County, Kentucky.

Davis was a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1819, 1825, 1827 and 1828. He was an unsuccessful candidate for election to the Twentieth and Twenty-second Congresses but was elected as an Anti-Jacksonian to the Twenty-third Congress (March 4, 1833 – March 3, 1835). While he was a candidate for reelection, he died in Owingsville, Kentucky, while campaigning in 1835. He was buried in the City Cemetery, Mount Sterling, Kentucky. His brother, Garrett Davis, served as a member of the United States Senate.

Axovant Sciences

Axovant Sciences Ltd. is a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company that develops, in association with other pharmaceutical companies, small molecule drugs and gene therapies to treat neurological and neuromuscular disorders. The company is legally incorporated in Bermuda, but has headquarters in London, along with secondary offices in Basel, Switzerland and New York City. The company was founded by former hedge fund analyst Vivek Ramaswamy in 2014 as a wholly owned subsidiary of Roivant Sciences.It held its IPO in 2015 and raised $315 million. Biotech analysts John Carroll of FierceBiotech and Adam Feuerstein of The Street noted that the IPO was overvalued based on the inexperience of the CEO and the low quality of its lead product, describing it as something that "GSK sold for lunch money".As of 2015 the company's most advanced drug candidate was intepirdine, a potential add-on treatment to donepezil for patients with Alzheimer's disease and patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. Axovant acquired this molecule from GlaxoSmithKline in December 2014. In July 2017, Axovant announced that the results of a phase III trial indicated that the drug was not effective for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. It also entered clinical trials for dementia with Lewy bodies, which were unsuccessful as well. Consequently, Axovant announced in 2018 that it has discontinued development of this drug.As of 2016 Axovant was also developing a second compound, nelotanserin. Axovant acquired global rights to nelotanserin from its former parent, Roivant, which had previously bought those rights from Arena Pharmaceuticals. As of 2016 Axovant was developing it as a treatment for Lewy body dementiaIn 2016 Axovant partnered with NFL broadcaster Solomon Wilcots to raise awareness of Alzheimer's clinical trials That year it also sponsored performances in several U.S cities of “Forget Me Not,” a play by Garrett Davis about an African American family coping with Alzheimer’s disease, in order to raise awareness of its clinical trials in that community, because African Americans are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease as white Americans, but have been historically underrepresented in clinical research studies.Also in 2016, Axovant partnered with the mobile rideshare service Lyft to transport patients in Alzheimer's disease studies to clinical facilities.In 2017, David Hung joined the company as CEO.In 2018, David Hung resigned and Pavan Cheruvu became the new CEO.In December 2018, Axovant added two gene therapy programs to treat GM1 gangliosidosis and Tay–Sachs and Sandhoff diseases.

Davis County

Davis County is or was the name of the following counties in the United States:

Davis County, Iowa, named in honor of Garrett Davis, a Congressman from Kentucky

Davis County, Utah, named for Daniel C. Davis, captain in the Mormon Battalion

Cass County, Texas, named Davis County from 1861 to 1871Davis County may also refer to:

Jeff Davis County, Texas

Jeff Davis County, Georgia

Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana

Jefferson Davis County, Mississippi

Davis County, Iowa

Davis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Iowa. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,753. The county seat is Bloomfield.Davis County is included in the Ottumwa, IA Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Dean of the United States Senate

The Dean of the United States Senate is an informal term for the Senator with the longest continuous service, regardless of party affiliation. This is not an official position within the Senate, although customarily (since 1945) the longest-serving member of the majority party serves as President pro tempore.

The current Dean is Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont.

John Chambers (politician)

John Chambers (October 6, 1780 – September 21, 1852) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky and the second Governor of the Iowa Territory.

Kentucky's 12th congressional district

United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 12 was a district of the United States Congress in Kentucky. It was lost to redistricting in 1843. Its last Representative was Garrett Davis.

Kentucky's 8th congressional district

United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 8 was a district of the United States Congress in Kentucky. It was lost to redistricting in 1963. Its last Representative was Eugene Siler.

Lazarus W. Powell

Lazarus Whitehead Powell (October 6, 1812 – July 3, 1867) was the 19th Governor of Kentucky, serving from 1851 to 1855. He was later elected to represent Kentucky in the U.S. Senate from 1859 to 1865.

The reforms enacted during Powell's term as governor gave Kentucky one of the top educational systems in the antebellum South. He also improved Kentucky's transportation system and vetoed legislation that he felt would have created an overabundance of banks in the Commonwealth. Powell's election as governor marked the end of Whig dominance in Kentucky. Powell's predecessor, John J. Crittenden, was the last governor elected from the party of the Commonwealth's favorite son, Henry Clay.

Following his term as governor, Powell was elected to the U.S. Senate. Before he could assume office, President James Buchanan dispatched Powell and Major Benjamin McCulloch to Utah to ease tensions with Brigham Young and the Mormons. Powell assumed his Senate seat on his return from Utah, just prior to the election of Abraham Lincoln as president. Powell became an outspoken critic of Lincoln's administration, so much so that the Kentucky General Assembly asked for his resignation and some of his fellow senators tried to have him expelled from the body. Both groups later renounced their actions.

Powell died at his home near Henderson, Kentucky shortly following a failed bid to return to the Senate in 1867.

List of United States Senators in the 38th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 38th United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1863, to March 3, 1865.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the Congress (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1864 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

List of United States Senators in the 39th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 39th United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1865, to March 3, 1867.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the Congress (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1866 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

List of United States Senators in the 40th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 40th United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1867, to March 3, 1869.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the Congress (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1868 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

List of United States Senators in the 41st Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 41st United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1869, to March 3, 1871.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the congress (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1870 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

Right Now Kapow

Right Now Kapow is an American animated sketch comedy television series produced by Warner Bros. Animation for Disney XD. It is the only collaboration between Warner Bros. and Disney since Who Framed Roger Rabbit. The series premiered on September 19, 2016 and ended on May 31, 2017. The series was created by Justin Becker and Marly Halpern-Graser, who previously worked on the Cartoon Network series Mad. Becker also worked on Adult Swim infomercials, and Halpern-Graser also worked on Cartoon Network's DC Nation. The series follows six anthropomorphic characters, Dog, Candy, Ice Cream, Diamond, Plant, and Moon going on new adventures everyday...and find themselves in mischief, in a manner similar to the original Looney Tunes shorts. Every episode of the series has 3 main parts in every 11-minute segment and other random shorts. The series has a style of humor similar to Cartoon Network's previous series, Mad. The show is rated TV-Y7.

On May 31, 2017, Disney XD cancelled the series after one season.

Unionist Party (United States)

The Unionist Party, later re-named the Unconditional Unionist Party, was a political party in the United States started after the Compromise of 1850 to define politicians who supported the Compromise. Members included Southern Democrats who were loyal to the Union as well as elements of the old Whig Party and other factions opposed to a separate Southern Confederacy.

It was used primarily as a label by Southerners who did not want to affiliate with the Republicans, or wished to win over anti-secession Democrats.

United States congressional delegations from Kentucky

Below are tables of congressional delegations from Kentucky to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Willis Benson Machen

Willis Benson Machen (April 10, 1810 – September 29, 1893) was a Democratic U.S. Senator from Kentucky.

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