Garbage time

Garbage time is a term used to refer to the period toward the end of a timed sports competition that has become a blowout when the outcome of the game has already been decided, and the coaches of one or both teams will decide to replace their best players with substitutes.[1] This serves to give those substitutes, who are usually less experienced or younger players, actual playing experience, as well as to protect the best players from the possibility of injury.[2]

Garbage time owes its name to the fact that this period in a game is frequently marked by a significant drop in the quality of game play. This occurs for two primary reasons. First, the players involved during that time are generally less experienced, having not played nearly as often as the starting players. Second, the fact that seldom-used substitutes usually desire more future playing time means that when those players do play, they are often more concerned with making an individual impression than with executing team play at its best; this is especially true during garbage time because at that point, the matter of which team will win has already been decided.[3]

In some sports, there are so-called "unwritten rules" for garbage time which indicate that the leading team should neither continue to play its starting players, devote unnecessary effort toward increasing the size of its lead, nor attempt particularly difficult and spectacular plays.[4] Doing so is interpreted as an unsportsmanlike attempt to embarrass or humiliate the trailing team, and in some cases may also be seen as retaliation, either against the opponent or the critics of the team in general (see running up the score for a more detailed explanation of this type of behavior). However, sometimes a team may have a legitimate motivation for running up the score, such when margin of victory is a factor in rankings, as it was for many years in the Bowl Championship Series.

During garbage time, the trailing team can sometimes rack up an unusually high tally of statistics, leading the respective box score to be misleading with respect to their actual game performance. For instance, in American football, if the losing team is behind by several touchdowns, the offense may resort entirely to the passing game in a futile effort to catch up. At the same time, the leading team (on defense, with second or third string players) may allow them to complete plays (which benefits them by running out the clock). This may lead the statistics to indicate a high amount of passing yards for the losing squad, which would suggest the team performed better than in reality.

In some cases, both teams will use second or third string players in garbage time, and in college play, if first-string players are draft-eligible juniors or seniors, the second and third-string players will play to gain an advantage towards becoming first-string the next season. Sometimes the game experience gained by backup players during garbage time can be crucial to their development, since it is otherwise difficult for them to see playing time (especially certain positions such as the backup quarterback), although this experience comes with the caveats that garbage time is not a high pressure situation and that unusual strategies may be employed. Complementing this strategy, teams sit their first-string players during garbage time to give them more rest and avoid further injuries for future games. In baseball, teams losing by a blowout often use long reliever or even a position player as the pitcher; while the latter does save the bullpen for future games that position player is more prone to injury pitching.

In general, although not always the case, it is not unusual in American football for the losing team to have more passing attempts/yards than the winning team, unless the winning team is also using a reserve quarterback. Often in the college game a freshman quarterback will be playing during garbage time when the upperclassman quarterback has put the game out of reach, gaining experience with the second-string (and on rare occasions, third-string) receivers and backs.

Particularly at the youth level, garbage time is eliminated by the use of a mercy rule, which automatically ends a game when the margin of winning has crossed a point that is commonly believed to be insurmountable.

The phrase garbage time is one of a number of commonly used basketball terms, each of which is thought to have either been coined by broadcaster Chick Hearn, or first given widespread exposure through Hearn's adoption of it for use during his broadcasts.[5]

2008-1101-USCWash-pan-001
Garbage time in the fourth quarter of a decided game (the USC Trojans lead the Washington Huskies 49–0); as a result of the home team's assured victory, the announced crowd of over 80,000 has dissipated.
09-02-06-RSSduringGarbageTime
During the garbage time of an already settled football game, the previously full stadium is now half-full and the substitutes are on the field.

See also

References

  1. ^ Beech, Roland. "Coaching by the numbers" Archived 2007-01-14 at the Wayback Machine, nbcsports.com, October 31, 2006
  2. ^ Jackson, John. "Trash men: Rookies roll in garbage time", Chicago Sun-Times, December 25, 2006
  3. ^ "Garbage Time Player Stats", 82games.com
  4. ^ King Kaufman. "King Kaufman's Sports Daily", salon.com, December 19, 2006
  5. ^ The Guardian. "Obituary: Chick Hearn", https://www.theguardian.com/us, August 7, 2002
Big Blue Wrecking Crew

The Big Blue Wrecking Crew was the defense for the New York Giants during the 1980s that won two Super Bowl Championships, the first in Super Bowl XXI in 1986 and the other in Super Bowl XXV in 1990. A 3-4 defense, it was among the greatest NFL defenses of all time, and featured Lawrence Taylor as its star, considered by many to be the greatest defensive player in NFL history.

Blowout (sports)

In sports, a blowout is an easy or one-sided victory. It occurs when one athletic team or individual performer outscores another by a large margin or in such a fashion that allows the second team or individual little chance of a victory from a point early in a competition, game, contest or event, e.g. Team A defeats Team B 75–10. The term is often used in reference to athletic competition, but it is used in other contexts such as electoral politics (see also the synonym landslide).During blowouts, sports play-by-play announcers are challenged to maintain viewing and listening audience interest and ratings. The announcers attempt to keep a stock of relevant informative discourse for such events.Blowouts are common during the first few weeks of the NCAA college football season, when schools from Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) Power 5 conferences, e.g., the Big Ten or Big 12, play those from the Football Championship Subdivision, formerly Division I-AA, or FBS "Group of 5" teams e.g., the MAC or The American, usually winning by dozens of points.

Brock Huard

Brock Anthony Huard (born April 15, 1976) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL). His older brother Damon also played quarterback at the University of Washington and had an extended career in the NFL. Younger brother Luke played at North Carolina and pursued a coaching career.

Cornerback

A cornerback (CB), also referred to as a corner or defensive halfback in older parlance, is a member of the defensive backfield or secondary in American and Canadian football. Cornerbacks cover receivers most of the time, to defend against offensive plays, i.e create turnovers in best case or (more common) deflect a forward pass or rather make a tackle. Other members of the defensive backfield include the safeties and occasionally linebackers. The cornerback position requires speed, agility, and strength. A cornerback's skillset typically requires proficiency in anticipating the quarterback, backpedaling, executing single and zone coverage, disrupting pass routes, block shedding, and tackling. Cornerbacks are among the fastest players on the field.

ESPN

ESPN (originally an initialism for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network) is a U.S.-based sports television channel owned by ESPN Inc., a joint venture owned by The Walt Disney Company (80%) and Hearst Communications (20%). The company was founded in 1979 by Bill Rasmussen along with his son Scott Rasmussen and Ed Egan.

ESPN broadcasts primarily from studio facilities located in Bristol, Connecticut. The network also operates offices in Miami, New York City, Seattle, Charlotte, and Los Angeles. James Pitaro currently serves as chairman of ESPN, a position he has held since March 5, 2018 due to the resignation of John Skipper on December 18, 2017 (who succeeded George Bodenheimer as president in 2012). While ESPN is one of the most successful sports networks, there has been much criticism of ESPN, which includes accusations of biased coverage, conflict of interest, and controversies with individual broadcasters and analysts.

As of January 2016, ESPN is available to approximately 91,405,000 paid television households (78.527% of households with at least one television set) in the United States. Nielsen has reported a much lower number in 2017, below 90,000,000 subscribers, losing more than 10,000 a day. In addition to the flagship channel and its seven related channels in the United States, ESPN broadcasts in more than 200 countries, operating regional channels in Australia, Brazil, Latin America and the United Kingdom, and owning a 20% interest in The Sports Network (TSN) as well as its five sister networks in Canada.

In 2011, ESPN's history and rise was chronicled in Those Guys Have All the Fun, a nonfiction book written by James Andrew Miller and Tom Shales and published by Little, Brown and Company.

Embassy Row (production company)

Embassy Row is an American television, global-based format, and digital production company based in New York City, owned by Sony Pictures Television.

Garbage (disambiguation)

Garbage is an unwanted or undesired material or substance discarded by residents. The term is often used interchangeably with municipal solid waste.

Garbage may also refer to:

Litter, improperly disposed waste products

Garbage (computer science), unreferenced data in a computer's memory

Garbage (band), a rock band

Garbage (album), the band's debut

Garbage (EP), a 1995 album by the band Autechre

"Garbage", a song by Bill Steele and Pete Seeger

"Garbage", a song by Dir En Grey from Withering to Death.

"Garbage", a song by TISM from Machiavelli and the Four Seasons

"Garbage", a song by Tyler, the Creator from The Music of Grand Theft Auto V

Garbage time, in sport, subbing in of less experienced players towards the end of a game

Hasheem Thabeet

Hasheem Thabeet (born Hashim Thabit Manka on 16 February 1987) is a Tanzanian professional basketball player who is currently a free agent. He played college basketball for Connecticut before being drafted second overall in the 2009 NBA draft by the Memphis Grizzlies.

Interception

In ball-playing competitive team sports, an interception or pick is a move by a player involving a pass of the ball—whether by foot or hand, depending on the rules of the sport—in which the ball is intended for a player of the same team but caught by a player of the opposing team, who thereby usually gains possession of the ball for their team. It is commonly seen in football, including American and Canadian football, as well as association football, rugby league, rugby union, Australian rules football and Gaelic football, as well as any sport by which a loose object is passed between players toward a goal.

In basketball, a pick is called a steal.

J. K. Simmons

Jonathan Kimble Simmons (born January 9, 1955) is an American actor and voice actor. In television, he is perhaps best known for playing Dr. Emil Skoda on the NBC series Law & Order, Vernon Schillinger on the HBO series Oz and Assistant Police Chief Will Pope on TNT's The Closer. From 2017 to 2018, he starred as Howard Silk in the Starz series Counterpart.

His film roles include J. Jonah Jameson in Sam Raimi's Spider-Man trilogy and music instructor Terence Fletcher in 2014's Whiplash. He is known for voicing Cave Johnson in the video game Portal 2 (2011), Tenzin in The Legend of Korra (2012–2014), Stanford Pines in Gravity Falls (2015–2016), Kai in Kung Fu Panda 3 (2016) and Mayor Lionheart in Zootopia (2016). He reprised his role as Jameson in various Marvel animated series and video games. He has also appeared in a series of commercials for Farmers Insurance and voices the Yellow M&M.

Simmons's performance in Whiplash received widespread critical acclaim and earned him more than thirty accolades, including the Academy Award, Golden Globe Award and BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actor.

Junior varsity team

Junior varsity (often called "JV") players are the members of a team who are not the main players in a competition (such as any football, basketball, or baseball game), usually at the high school and college levels in the United States. The main players comprise the varsity team. Although the intensity of the JV team may vary from place to place, most junior varsity teams consist of players who are in their freshman and sophomore years in school, though occasionally upperclassmen may play on JV teams. For this reason, junior varsity teams are also often called freshman/sophomore teams. Especially skilled or physically mature freshmen and sophomores may compete at the varsity level. Some private school associations may permit very skilled seventh- or eighth-graders to compete on varsity teams. At larger schools, there may be two junior varsity teams for some sports, with a lower-level team typically consisting only of freshmen.

Katie Nolan

Katherine Beth Nolan (born January 28, 1987) is an American sports personality, and television host on ESPN. Nolan formerly hosted Fox Sports' weekly series Garbage Time with Katie Nolan, which won a Sports Emmy Award in 2016.

List of programs broadcast by Fox Sports 1

The following is a list of programs broadcast currently or formerly on Fox Sports 1, and occasionally on sister network Fox Sports 2.

Muffed punt

In gridiron football, a muffed punt is defined as "touching of the ball prior to possessing the ball.”

A muffed punt occurs when there is an "uncontrolled touch" of the football by a player on the returning team after it is punted. This can occur when:

The kicking team interferes with the other team's right to catch the punt

A player on the kicking team is struck unaware by the football running down-field to cover the punt.

A player attempts to return the ball, makes contact with it but cannot retain the ball in his hands and it comes loose.

To be a fumble, the receiving team must possess the football, then lose control. In the case of a fumble, the ball is live and can be returned by the team that recovers the ball. In the case of a muffed punt, it is possible for the punting team to recover the ball and continue the drive, but at least in NCAA and NFL rules, they cannot advance the ball on that same play. Rules vary by league about how to handle a muffed punt.

Nonetheless, a muffed punt is a turnover. In the NFL, a muffed punt recovered by the kicking team cannot be challenged by a coach for review because all turnovers are automatically reviewed.

Punter (football)

A punter (P) in American or Canadian football is a special teams player who receives the snapped ball directly from the line of scrimmage and then punts (kicks) the football to the opposing team so as to limit any field position advantage. This generally happens on a fourth down in American football and a third down in Canadian football. Punters may also occasionally take part in fake punts in those same situations, when they throw or run the football instead of punting.

Resting the starters

Resting the starters is the substitution of regular players on a sports team with backup players, and it occurs when a team has clinched at least a playoff berth, often its division, and in many case home advantage, and no further regular season losses would hurt the team in the standings (or, inversely, if the team has been eliminated from postseason contention and has nothing further to gain by playing). This enables the team to avoid risking injury to the starters, and to give real life playing practice to backup players.Veteran starters are also frequently rested in the final preseason games in order to get them ready for the early part of the season.Also, starters are sometimes rested during a game during garbage time when the outcome is mostly certain. While usually garbage time takes place toward the end of the fourth quarter of a game, in games where there is such a vast difference in talent and the winning team very quickly gains a large lead, the starters will be removed from the game early -- sometimes well before the end of the first half -- and the second- and lower-string players will play the remainder of the contest. As such, the starters play long enough only to gain a significant lead, and giving the reserves extended playing time.

Ricky Stanzi

Ricky Stanzi (born September 3, 1987) is an American football quarterback who is currently a free agent. He was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs in the fifth round of the 2011 NFL Draft. He played college football at University of Iowa.

Tavon Austin

Tavon Wesley Austin (born March 15, 1990) is an American football wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at West Virginia where he received All-American honors twice. He was drafted by the St. Louis Rams in the first round of the 2013 NFL Draft.

Wide receiver

A wide receiver, also referred to as wideouts or simply receivers, is an offensive position in American and Canadian football, and is a key player. They get their name because they are split out "wide" (near the sidelines), farthest away from the rest of the team. Wide receivers are among the fastest players on the field. The wide receiver functions as the pass-catching specialist.

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Scoring
Turnovers
Downs
Play clock
Statistics
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Officiating
Miscellaneous

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