Gannett Peak

Gannett Peak[4] is the highest mountain peak in the U.S. state of Wyoming at 13,810 feet (4,210 m). It lies in the Wind River Range within the Bridger Wilderness of the Bridger-Teton National Forest. Straddling the Continental Divide along the boundary between Fremont and Sublette counties, it has the second greatest topographic prominence in the state (7076') after Cloud Peak (7077'), and is the highest ground for 290 miles in any direction.

Gannett Peak
Gannett Peak
West face of Gannett Peak
Highest point
Elevation13,810 ft (4,210 m) [2][3]
Prominence7,076 ft (2,157 m) [2]
Isolation290 mi (470 km) [2]
Parent peakLongs Peak[1]
Listing
Coordinates43°11′03″N 109°39′15″W / 43.184202022°N 109.654233614°WCoordinates: 43°11′03″N 109°39′15″W / 43.184202022°N 109.654233614°W[3]
Geography
Gannett Peak is located in Wyoming
Gannett Peak
Gannett Peak
Wyoming
LocationFremont and Sublette Counties, Wyoming, United States
Parent rangeWind River Range
Topo mapUSGS Gannett Peak
Climbing
First ascent1922 by A. Tate and F. Stahlnaker
Easiest routerock/ice climb

Overview

Geographically, Gannett Peak is the apex of the entire Central Rockies, the largely continuous chain of mountains occupying the states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. Named in 1906 for American geographer Henry Gannett,[5] the peak is also the high point of the Wind River Range. The mountain slopes are located in both Bridger-Teton National Forest and Shoshone National Forest.

Gannett is the highest peak within what is better known as the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and is the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains outside of Colorado. The 896-acre (3.63 km2) Gannett Glacier, which is likely the largest single glacier in the American portion of the Rocky Mountains, extends across the northern slopes of the mountain. Minor Glacier is situated in the western cirque of the peak while Dinwoody and Gooseneck Glaciers can be found on the southeast side of the mountain.

Gannet Peak with Gannett Glacier
Gannett Glacier on the north side of the peak

Gannett Peak is in the heart of a remote and rugged wilderness. Because of this, its elevation, and extreme weather, it is often considered by mountaineers to be one of the most difficult U.S. state high points to reach, after Denali and possibly Granite Peak.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Gannett Peak". ListsOfJohn.com. Retrieved 2008-12-05.
  2. ^ a b c "Gannett Peak, Wyoming". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Gannett Peak Cairn". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey. Retrieved 2008-12-05.
  4. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Gannett Peak
  5. ^ Penry, Jerry (27 October 2007). "The Father of Government Mapmaking: Henry Gannett". American Surveyor. Retrieved 2008-09-28.

External links

Bastion Peak-Northeast Peak

Bastion Peak-Northeast Peak 13,476 ft (4,107 m) is located in the Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The peak is one of the highest in Wyoming, and is connected to its taller neighbor Bastion Peak by an arête to the southwest. An unnamed glacier lies below the precipitous east flank of the mountain, while Gannett Glacier is to the south.

Bow Mountain

Bow Mountain (13,025 ft (3,970 m)) is located in the northern Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Situated 1 mi (1.6 km) west of American Legion Peak, Bow Mountain is in the Bridger Wilderness of Bridger-Teton National Forest. Stroud Glacier lies just to the north of the peak. Bow Mountain is the 29th tallest peak in Wyoming.

Bridger Wilderness

The Bridger Wilderness is located in Bridger-Teton National Forest in Wyoming, United States. Originally established in 1931 as a primitive area, 428,169-acre (1,732.74 km2) region was redesignated as a wilderness in 1964 and expanded to the current size in 1984. The wilderness lies on the west side of the Continental Divide in the Wind River Range and contains Gannett Peak; at 13,809 feet (4,209 m) it is the tallest mountain in Wyoming. The wilderness is a part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

U.S. Wilderness Areas do not allow motorized or mechanized vehicles, including bicycles. Although camping and fishing are allowed with proper permit, no roads or buildings are constructed and there is also no logging or mining, in compliance with the 1964 Wilderness Act. Wilderness areas within National Forests and Bureau of Land Management areas also allow hunting in season.

There are 600 miles (970 km) of hiking trails maintained in the wilderness, but with much of the terrain being steep and with many large mountain peaks to climb, many trails provide access climbing routes. Camping is permitted as long as a distance of at least 200 feet (61 m) minimum is maintained away from lakes and streams. Due to the high altitude associated with this wilderness, it is not uncommon to have freezing weather, especially at night anytime of the year. In the summer months mosquitos can also be a problem.

The largest glaciers in Bridger-Teton National Forest are found in the wilderness. While lower slopes of the mountainsides are dominated by aspen and lodgepole pine, the upper altitudes include lodgepole pine, and numerous species of spruce and fir. Above the timberline at 10,300 feet (3,100 m), the plants are delicate and subject to high human impact and care must be used to stay on trails to minimize natural resource impact which can take decades or more for recovery. Infrequent and rare sightings of grizzly bears have been recorded but black bears are much more common. In addition, most of the megafauna originally indigenous to the region still exist in the wilderness including moose, elk, mule deer, wolverine, bighorn sheep and mountain lion. There have been unconfirmed reports of wolf sightings which may be true due to wolf reintroduction commenced in the late 20th century in Yellowstone National Park to the north. Numerous bird species are found including bald eagle, osprey, peregrine falcon and Clark's nutcracker. The streams have long been home to several species of trout, but stocking of the lakes has increased their numbers there along with mountain whitefish and grayling.

Cathedral Group

The Cathedral Group is the group of the tallest mountains of the Teton Range, all of which are located in Grand Teton National Park in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The Cathedral Group are classic alpine peaks, with pyramidal shapes caused by glacial motion. The highest peak in the group is Grand Teton, which rises more than 7,000 feet (2,100 m) above Jackson Hole valley, and is the second tallest mountain in Wyoming, after Gannett Peak. The Cathedral Group is separated by other tall peaks of the range by the Cascade Canyon to the north and Avalanche Canyon to the south.Half the remaining dozen glaciers in the Teton Range are located in this cluster of high peaks, including the Teton Glacier which is the largest one in the range. Other glaciers such as the Middle Teton Glacier, Teepe Glacier, and Schoolroom Glacier are also located here. The Cathedral Group has several high cirques, arêtes as well as hanging and U-shaped valleys which are all the work of glacial activity. At the base of the Cathedral Group, several glacial lakes can be found, including Jenny, Bradley and Taggart Lakes, all of which were formed when the glaciers of the last ice age retreated, leaving behind terminal moraines which acted as natural dams. A few high altitude lakes can also be found scattered among the peaks.

Cloud Peak

Cloud Peak is the highest peak within the Bighorn Mountains in the U.S. state of Wyoming. It rises to an elevation of 13,171 feet (4,015 m) and provides onlookers with dramatic views and vistas. The mountain can be climbed most easily from the western side, accessed by either the Battle Park or West Tensleep trail-heads and is roughly 24 miles round-trip from both. The peak is located in the 189,000 acre (765 km²) Cloud Peak Wilderness within Bighorn National Forest. The northeast slope of Cloud Peak is a deep cirque which harbors Cloud Peak Glacier, the last active glacier in the Bighorn Mountains.

Cloud Peak is on the border between Johnson County and Big Horn County in Wyoming and is the high point of both counties. As the high point of an isolated range, Cloud Peak has the greatest topographic prominence in the state, 7,077 feet (2,157 m), one foot more than the state's hightest mountain, 13,810 foot (4,210 m) Gannett Peak, and fifteenth greatest in the contiguous United States.

Desolation Peak (Wyoming)

Desolation Peak (13,161 ft (4,011 m)) is located in the northern Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Situated .66 mi (1.06 km) west of Rampart Peak, Desolation Peak is within the Bridger Wilderness of Bridger-Teton National Forest and west of the Continental Divide. Desolation Peak is the 22nd tallest peak in Wyoming.

Flagstone Peak (Fremont County, Wyoming)

Flagstone Peak (13,456 ft (4,101 m)) is located in the Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The peak is the 12th highest peak in Wyoming. The summit is located on the Continental Divide and is in both Shoshone and Bridger-Teton National Forests. The Flagstone Peak-Southeast Peak (13,160 ft (4,010 m)) lies .25 mi (0.40 km) to the southeast.

Gannett Glacier

Gannett Glacier is the largest glacier in the Rocky Mountains within the United States. The glacier is located on the east and north slopes of Gannett Peak, the highest mountain in Wyoming, on the east side of the Continental Divide in the Wind River Range. Gannett is but one of dozens of glaciers located in the Fitzpatrick Wilderness of Shoshone National Forest.As is true with many glaciers around the world, Gannett Glacier is slowly disappearing. Photographic evidence clearly demonstrates that there has been an enormous reduction in the area of the glacier since the 1920s. The area of the glacier was estimated in 1950 to be 4.6 square kilometres (1,137 acres) and was measured in 1999 to be 3.63 square kilometres (897 acres). Measurements taken in 1958 and again in 1983 showed a depth reduction of 18.6 metres (61 ft) over 25 years. A general warming pattern and a reduction in moisture is widely believed to be the reason for the glacier retreating. Numerous other glaciers are located in the immediate area including six more that are within the top ten in size within the Rocky Mountains of the U.S.In a 1989 study, both Gannett and Dinwoody glaciers were researched to determine the amount of melt water they supplied to streams. Both glaciers supply melt water which flows into Dinwoody Creek, which in turn flows into the Wind River. The melt water was found to have contributed increasingly lower amounts to the total water supplied to Dinwoody Creek. This has been attributed to the glaciers thinning and retreating, especially since 1950, when Gannett Glacier was measured to be almost 20 percent larger than in 1999. The impact on reduced stream flow from Gannett Glacier due to glacial retreat affects more than just the amount of water available for the local ecosystem and downstream agricultural and ranching interests.

Gooseneck Glacier

Gooseneck Glacier is located in the Fitzpatrick Wilderness, Shoshone National Forest, in the US state of Wyoming. The glacier is east of the Continental Divide in the northern Wind River Range and on the southeast flank of Gannett Peak, the tallest mountain in Wyoming. Gooseneck Glacier is separated from Dinwoody Glacier by a rocky outcropping and they are part of the largest grouping of glaciers in the American Rocky Mountains.

Klondike Peak

Klondike Peak (13,120 ft (4,000 m)) is located in the northern Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Situated 4 mi (6.4 km) north of Gannett Peak, Klondike Peak is within the Bridger Wilderness of Bridger-Teton National Forest and west of the Continental Divide. The summit of Klondike Peak is partially capped by a small glacier and the northwest flank of the peak is the origination point of J Glacier, while Sourdough Glacier lies just to the northeast. Klondike Peak is the 26th tallest peak in Wyoming.

List of mountain peaks of Wyoming

This article comprises three sortable tables of major mountain peaks of the U.S. State of Wyoming.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level. The first table below ranks the 40 highest major summits of Wyoming by elevation.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings. The second table below ranks the 40 most prominent summits of Wyoming.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation. The third table below ranks the 40 most isolated major summits of Wyoming.

Minor Glacier

Minor Glacier is in Bridger-Teton National Forest, in the U.S. state of Wyoming on the west side of the Continental Divide in the northern Wind River Range. Minor Glacier is in the Bridger Wilderness and is part of the largest grouping of glaciers in the American Rocky Mountains. The glacier is situated below the west flank of Gannett Peak, the tallest mountain in Wyoming.

Mount Koven (Wyoming)

Mount Koven (13,271 ft (4,045 m)) is located in the Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Mount Koven is the 16th highest peak in Wyoming. The summit is on the Continental Divide in both Shoshone and Bridger-Teton National Forests and it is .75 mi (1.21 km) north-northwest of Gannett Peak. The Gannett Glacier flanks the peak to the east, while Minor Glacier is just southwest of the mountain.

Mount Whitecap

Mount Whitecap (13,025 ft (3,970 m)) is located in the northern Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Situated 2.25 mi (3.62 km) southwest of Gannett Peak, Mount Whitecap is in the Bridger Wilderness of Bridger-Teton National Forest. Baby Glacier lies just to the east of the peak and Split Mountain is 1 mi (1.6 km) southeast. Mount Whitecap is the 30th tallest peak in Wyoming.

Mount Woodrow Wilson

Mount Woodrow Wilson (13,502 feet (4,115 m)) is located in the Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Mount Woodrow Wilson is the eighth-highest mountain in the range and the ninth-highest in Wyoming. The summit is located in the Bridger Wilderness of Bridger-Teton National Forest on the Continental Divide, 1.25 miles (2.01 km) south of Gannett Peak. The flanks of the mountain are covered in snowfields and glaciers, including Dinwoody Glacier to the northeast, Mammoth Glacier to the west and Sphinx Glacier to the south.

It is named after the U.S. president Woodrow Wilson.

Rampart Peak

Rampart Peak (13,441 ft (4,097 m)) is located in the northern Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Situated .31 mi (0.50 km) south of Bastion Peak, Rampart Peak is within the Bridger Wilderness of Bridger-Teton National Forest and immediately west of the Continental Divide. Though one of the highest peaks in the Wind River Range, Rampart Peak is not ranked since it has less than 300 ft (91 m) of clean topographic prominence.

Split Mountain (Wyoming)

Split Mountain (13,161 ft (4,011 m)) is located in the Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Split Mountain is the 22nd highest peak in Wyoming. Split Mountain is in the Bridger Wilderness of Bridger-Teton National Forest and is about .70 mi (1.13 km) northwest of Twin Peaks and 1 mi (1.6 km) southeast of Mount Whitecap. Mammoth Glacier is on the northeast slopes of the peak while the smaller Baby Glacier flows down from a spur to the northwest.

Twin Peaks (Wyoming)

Twin Peaks (13,191 ft (4,021 m)) is located in the Wind River Range in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Twin Peaks is the 20th highest peak in Wyoming. Twin Peaks is in the Bridger Wilderness of Bridger-Teton National Forest and is .58 mi (0.93 km) southwest of Mount Woodrow Wilson and about the same distance southeast of Split Mountain. Mammoth Glacier flows from the north slopes of the peak while the smaller Twins Glacier flows to the southeast.

Wind River Range

The Wind River Range (or "Winds" for short), is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in western Wyoming in the United States. The range runs roughly NW–SE for approximately 100 miles (161 km). The Continental Divide follows the crest of the range and includes Gannett Peak, which at 13,804 feet (4,207 m), is the highest peak in Wyoming. There are more than 40 other named peaks in excess of 13,000 feet (3,962 m). With the exception of the Grand Teton in the Teton Range, the next 19 highest peaks in Wyoming after Gannett are also in the Winds. Two large National Forests including three wilderness areas encompass most of the mountain range. Shoshone National Forest is on the eastern side of the continental divide while Bridger-Teton National Forest is on the west. Both National Forests and the entire mountain range are an integral part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Portions of the range are also inside the Wind River Indian Reservation.

Absaroka Range
Bighorn Mountains
Black Hills
Gallatin Range
Gros Ventre Range
Laramie Mountains
Medicine Bow Mountains
Salt River Range
Teton Range
Uinta Mountains
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Highest natural points of U.S. states and selected additional areas
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