Gamasutra

Gamasutra is a website founded in 1997 that focuses on all aspects of video game development. It is owned and operated by UBM Technology Group (formerly a part of CMP Media), a division of UBM and acts as the online sister publication to the print magazine Game Developer.

Gamasutra
Gamasutra logo
Type of site
News and information for video game developers
OwnerUBM Technology Group
Created byUnknown
Websitegamasutra.com
Alexa rankNegative increase 10,435 (January 2015)[1]

Sections

Gamasutra has five main sections: the News where daily news is posted, the Features where developers post game postmortems and critical essays, Blogs where users can post their thoughts and views on various topics, Jobs/Resume where users can apply for open positions at various development studios, and Contractors where users can apply for contracted work. The articles can be filtered by either topic (All, Console/PC, Social/Online, Smartphone/Tablet, Independent, Serious) or category (Programming, Art, Audio, Design, Production, Biz/Marketing). There are three additional sections: a Store where books on game design may be purchased, RSS where users may subscribe to RSS feeds of each section of the website, and a section that links to the website's Twitter account.

Trade Center Resource

While it does post news found on typical video game websites, Gamasutra is known for providing online resources to aspiring and professional game developers on the disciplines of games, including design, audio, public relations, and art. Gamasutra encourages professionals to publish blogs in order to share their expertise with other developers. Analysis articles are popular reads as writers spark discussions on game design and the various trends of the industry. The editorial staff also takes part in conducting interviews with developers and hardware designers, such as Dragon Quest creator Yuji Horii, Nintendo 3DS designer Hideiki Anno, and Portal writer Erik Wolpaw.

Post-Mortems

Project postmortems, articles which developers recount the successful and unsuccessful elements of a specific game's development, are the most celebrated features on the website, as they provide direct insight in all aspects of game design and educate other developers of various risks and important tips. Many postmortems have been published, ranging from independent games such as Okabu and The Path to major studio projects such as Okamiden and BioShock. There are currently over 150 collected post-mortems dating back as far as 1997.[2] There have been unusual post-mortem articles published, including “A Story of GameLayers, Inc.” that reveals the tumultuous development and eventual cancellation of a Firefox toolbar-based MMORPG,[3] and “What Went Wrong? Learning from Past Post-Mortems” that details the most common mistakes that developers make as admitted in the articles.[4]

Guidelines

Gamasutra requires users who wish to publish articles on the website to work with the features director Christian Nutt, whether they have fleshed-out drafts, an outline, or a concept. The editorial staff offers help in shaping, polishing, and editing articles before publication. A broad range of topics can be selected given the audience, which consists of businesspeople, educators, and developers, both professional and aspiring. The articles are required to contain at least 1500 words, though the average length tends to be 2500 to 3500 words. Gamasutra also requires a thirty-day exclusivity period from the date of publication, after which the writer is free to take the article elsewhere and retains ownership.

Users are also allowed to comment on articles, but there is a strict set of rules. Comment guidelines are designed to keep user discussions of a given article on topic and prevent comments from devolving into[5] flame wars (hostile interactions on the Internet), as seen on other community-driven websites where comment regulations are looser. Users are encouraged to post only constructive thoughts that add to the conversation.

GameSetWatch

GameSetWatch is an alternative video game weblog and sister site of Gamasutra.com. It is dedicated to collecting curious links and media for offbeat and often ignored games from consoles old and new, as well as from the digital download, iOS, and indie spaces.[6]

GameSetWatch was founded by Simon Carless in November 2005. It has been up and running for 6 years until its semi-permanent hiatus in November 2011.The site has stopped as the creators saw an overlap of content with their sister site IndieGames.com and because they felt the mainstream gaming blogs were covering more of the "weirder" and alternative video game news.[7] GameSetWatch has remained up for readers but no new content has been posted since.

Those that contributed to the launch included current IGF chairman Brandon Boyer, GameTrailers stalwart Michael McWhertor, Gamasutra news director Frank Cifaldi, Alice Taylor, as well as Game Developer mag EIC Brandon Sheffield.[8]

The editors at the time Eric Caoili and Danny Cowan have taken different steps to help out at their sister sites. Cowan has gone to blog over at IndieGames.com and Caoili is at Gamasutra.

IndieGames.com

IndieGames.com started in October 2005. IndieGames.com is Gamasutra's sister site dedicated to reporting on indie games. It became the UBM TechWeb's main method to deliver news about independent games after GameSetWatch closed.[7] In September 2018, IndieGames.com split from its longtime owner UBM. The writers started a new independently ran website called IndieGamesPlus, and carried over the older IndieGames.com posts to the new website. [9]

Podcast

The IndieGames.com Podcast was started by Michael Rose and Tim in September 2010. It is available to listen to online or download on the website or iTunes store.[10]

An episode is released every week with a guest indie developer hosting the podcast in addition to the two creators of the show.

Tim was the independent owner and operator of the Independent Gaming Weblog which was shut down and sold to IndieGames.com in December 2007.[11] Michael Rose is an editor and writer at IndieGames.com.

The show has taken a hiatus since July 2012 and has no news of restarting as of yet.

Interviews

The interviews section of the site features interviews with indie game creators and developers. The interviewees answer a set of questions posed by the interviewer including questions regarding their inspirations and hardships. The page is also split into three categories; desktop, console and mobile to organize the interviews by platform interests.[12]

Features

The features section of the site consists of posts by the writers and editors of the site. Articles are written on any topic in the indie game sector. It was announced in September 2014 that there will be collaboration with Games We Care About Twitter page to help gamers discover alt.games recommended by developers and peers.[13]

There is also a Best of Features page that highlights some of the more notable freeware and indie games of this and previous years.[14]

Reviews

The Reviews section of the site is written by Michael Rose starting in February 2009. It features reviews on the games mentioned in the “Best of Features” page to give readers a look into the game before playing it themselves.[15]

Awards

Gamasutra and its team of editors won a Webby Award in 2006 and 2007; their five word acceptance speeches were "Heart plus science equals games" and "Art plus science, still games", respectively.[16]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Gamasutra.com Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  2. ^ "Postmortem". Gamasutra. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  3. ^ "A Story of GameLayers, Inc". Gamasutra. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  4. ^ "What Went Wrong? Learning From Past Postmortems". Gamasutra. April 22, 2009. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  5. ^ See [the example sentence for] sense number 5 ["To degenerate; to break down"] of this version of wikt:devolve#Verb. For (far) more example sentences, "see also" this other online dictionary, and while there, click on "more example sentences" at the entry for "(devolve into)" (that entry was labeled [sense] "1.2" as of August 3, 2017). The information in this footnote probably would "not" have fit into an "edit comment" (as of August 3, 2017)
  6. ^ "GameSetWatch". Gamasutra. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  7. ^ a b Tracey Lien (December 1, 2011). "GamePro And GameSetWatch Close Their Doors". Kotaku. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  8. ^ Eric Caoili (November 29, 2011). "This Is The End, My Friend". GameSetWatch. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  9. ^ Couture, Joel. "IndieGames: A Farewell, But A Hello At IndieGamesPlus.com!".
  10. ^ "IndieGames.com - The Weblog". indiegames.com. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  11. ^ "Independent Gaming: Announcement: IndieGames.Com: The Weblog". indygamer.blogspot.ca. December 25, 2007. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  12. ^ "IndieGames.com". indiegames.com. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  13. ^ Simon Carless (September 14, 2014). "IndieGames.com Games We Care About - Tough Love++!". indiegames.com. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  14. ^ "IndieGames.com - The Weblog". indiegames.com. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  15. ^ "IndieGames.com - The Weblog | Reviews". indiegames.com. Retrieved 2018-06-17.
  16. ^ "The Webby Awards: Archived Winner Speeches". International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on 2008-08-28. Retrieved 2008-08-02.

External links

Chris Remo

Chris Remo is an American video game designer, composer, writer, podcaster, and former journalist.

As a journalist, he cofounded the original Idle Thumbs website as well as its flagship podcast, and served as was Editor-in-Chief of Shacknews and Editor at Large for Gamasutra.

He composed the music for Thirty Flights of Loving, Gone Home, Spacebase DF-9 and Firewatch. He co-wrote The Cave with Ron Gilbert at Double Fine Productions. In early 2014, he left Double Fine to join his Idle Thumbs co-hosts Jake Rodkin and Sean Vanaman at Campo Santo, where he contributed to the studio's acclaimed narrative adventure game Firewatch as a game and story designer, composer, and audio director.

Early access

Early access, also known as early funding, alpha-access, or paid-alpha, is a funding model in the video game industry by which consumers can purchase and play a game in the various pre-release development cycles, such as pre-alpha, alpha, and/or beta, while the developer is able to use those funds to continue further development on the game. Those that pay to participate typically help to debug the game, provide feedback and suggestions, and may have access to special materials in the game. The early-access approach is a common way to obtain funding for indie games, and may also be used along with other funding mechanisms, including crowdfunding. Many crowdfunding projects promise to offer access to alpha and/or beta versions of the game as development progresses; however, unlike some of these projects which solicit funds but do not yet have a playable game, all early access games offer an immediately playable version of the unfinished game to players.

Game Developers Choice Awards

The Game Developers Choice Awards are awards annually presented at the Game Developers Conference for outstanding game developers and games.

Introduced in 2001, the Game Developers Choice Awards were preceded by the Spotlight Awards, which were presented from 1997 to 1999.

Gameloft

Gameloft SE is a French video game publisher based in Paris, founded in December 1999 by Ubisoft co-founder Michel Guillemot. The company operates 21 development studios worldwide, and publishes games with a special focus on the mobile games market. Formerly a public company traded at the Paris Bourse, Gameloft was fully acquired by French media conglomerate Vivendi in 2016.

Indie game

An indie game (short for independent video game) is a video game that is most often created without the financial support of a publisher, although some games funded by a publisher are still considered independent. These games often focus on innovation and rely on digital distribution. Indie gaming saw a rise in mainstream popularity in the latter half of the 2000s, primarily due to new online distribution methods and widely available video game development tools.Some indie games, such as Undertale, Braid, World of Goo, and Minecraft, have been quite successful financially.

Let's Play

A Let's Play (LP) is a video (or screenshots accompanied by text) documenting the playthrough of a video game, usually including commentary by the gamer. A Let's Play differs from a video game walkthrough or strategy guide by focusing on an individual's subjective experience with the game, often with humorous, irreverent, or critical commentary from the gamer, rather than being an objective source of information on how to progress through the game. While Let's Plays and live streaming of game playthroughs are related, Let's Plays tend to be curated experiences that include editing and scripted narration, while streaming is an unedited experience performed on the fly.

Open world

In video games, an open world is a virtual world in which the player can explore and approach objectives freely, as opposed to a world with more linear gameplay. While games have used open-world designs since the 1980s, the implementation in Grand Theft Auto III (2001) set a standard that has been used since.Games with open or free-roaming worlds typically lack the invisible walls and loading screens common in linear level designs. Generally, open-world games still enforce many restrictions in the game environment, either because of absolute technical limitations or in-game limitations imposed by a game's linearity. Examples of high level of autonomy in computer games can be found in massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPG) or in single-player games adhering to the open world concept such as the Fallout series. The main appeal of open-world gameplay is that they provide a simulated reality and allow players to develop their character and its behavior in the direction of their choosing. In these cases, there is often no concrete goal or end to the game.

Pokémon Platinum

Pokémon: Platinum Version is a role-playing video game developed by Game Freak, published by The Pokémon Company and Nintendo for the Nintendo DS handheld game console. It is an enhanced version of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl and is part of the fourth generation of the Pokémon series of video games. It was released on September 13, 2008, in Japan; March 22, 2009, in North America; May 14, 2009, in Australia and May 22, 2009, in Europe. The developers made Platinum with the intent of making it a stronger version of Diamond and Pearl, which they described as the "ultimate" Pokémon titles.

In Platinum, players control either a male or female child character and start off with one of three Pokémon — Turtwig, Chimchar, or Piplup — from Professor Rowan. The mascot Pokémon is Giratina, who plays a central role in the game's plot. While it only had one form in Diamond and Pearl, it is given a new alternate form alongside a new area called the Distortion World, which features altered physics from the normal land of Sinnoh, where the game takes place. The gameplay stays true to traditional Pokémon mechanics. Players explore a large area, which ranges from mountains to bodies of water, grasslands, populated areas, and snowy expanses. Similar to previous titles, players have their Pokémon fight turn-based battles against other Pokémon.

Pokémon Platinum has been met with generally positive reception, holding aggregate scores of 84 and 83.14% at Metacritic and GameRankings, respectively. It was praised for being the best Pokémon game ever made and also praised for the additions and changes made to Diamond and Pearl by publications such as IGN, Nintendo Power, and GamePro, although it has also been criticized for being too similar to them. IGN ranked it as the ninth best Nintendo DS game ever made, as well as nominating it as one of the best DS role-playing games of 2009. It was the fastest-selling game in Japan at the time, selling 7.06 million copies by March 31, 2010.

Portal 2

Portal 2 is a first-person puzzle-platform video game developed by Valve Corporation. It was released in April 2011 for Windows, OS X, Linux, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360. The digital PC version is distributed online by Valve's Steam service, while all retail editions were published by Electronic Arts.

Like the original Portal (2007), players solve puzzles by placing portals and teleporting between them. Portal 2 adds features including tractor beams, lasers, light bridges, and paint-like gels that alter player movement or allow portals to be placed on any surface. In the single-player campaign, players control Chell, who navigates the dilapidated Aperture Science Enrichment Center during its reconstruction by the supercomputer GLaDOS (Ellen McLain); new characters include robot Wheatley (Stephen Merchant) and Aperture founder Cave Johnson (J. K. Simmons). In the new cooperative mode, players solve puzzles together as robots Atlas and P-Body (both voiced by Dee Bradley Baker). Jonathan Coulton and the National produced songs for the game.

Valve announced Portal 2 in March 2010, and promoted it with alternate reality games including the Potato Sack, a collaboration with several independent game developers. After release, Valve released downloadable content and a simplified map editor to allow players to create and share levels.

Portal 2 received acclaim for its gameplay, balanced learning curve, pacing, dark humor, writing, and acting. It has been described as one of the greatest video games of all time by numerous publications and critics.

Rebellion Developments

Rebellion Developments Limited is a British video game developer based in Oxford, England. Founded by Jason and Chris Kingsley in December 1992, the company is best known for its Sniper Elite series and multiple games in the Alien vs. Predator series. Rebellion has published comic books since 2000, when it purchased 2000 AD, the publisher of characters such as Judge Dredd and Rogue Trooper.

Simplygon

Simplygon is 3D computer graphics software for automatic 3D optimization, based on proprietary methods for creating level of detail (LODs) through Polygon mesh reduction and other optimization techniques.

Since the launch of Simplygon, the product has been licensed by a number of AAA game studios, for multi-platform games, and used in areas such as architecture, 3D CAD, 3D scan, 3D web and 3D printing.

The algorithms in Simplygon are designed to also optimize different type of input forms, and a number of visualization projects outside gaming are currently deploying this technology in areas such as architecture, 3D CAD, 3D scan, 3D web and 3D printing.

Steam (software)

Steam is a digital distribution platform developed by Valve Corporation for purchasing and playing video games. Steam offers digital rights management (DRM), matchmaking servers, video streaming, and social networking services. Steam provides the user with installation and automatic updating of games, and community features such as friends lists and groups, cloud saving, and in-game voice and chat functionality.

The software provides a freely available application programming interface (API) called Steamworks, which developers can use to integrate many of Steam's functions into their products, including networking, matchmaking, in-game achievements, microtransactions, and support for user-created content through Steam Workshop. Though initially developed for use on Microsoft Windows operating systems, versions for macOS and Linux were later released. Mobile apps with connected functionality with the main software were later released for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone in the 2010s. The platform also offers a small selection of non-video game content, such as design software, anime, and films.

The Steam platform is the largest digital distribution platform for PC gaming, estimated in 2013 to have 75% of the market space. By 2017, users purchasing games through Steam totaled roughly US$4.3 billion, representing at least 18% of global PC game sales. By early 2018, the service had over 150 million registered accounts with a peak of 18.5 million concurrent users online. The success of the Steam platform has led to the development of a line of Steam Machine microconsoles, which include the SteamOS operating system and Steam Controllers, and various virtual reality devices such as the HTC Vive.

Take-Two Interactive

Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. is an American video game holding company based in New York City. The company owns two major publishing labels, Rockstar Games, and 2K, itself composed of two divisions: 2K Games and 2K Sports, all of which own and operate various game development studios. Take-Two's portfolio includes numerous successful video game series across personal computer and video game consoles, including BioShock, Borderlands, Civilization, Grand Theft Auto, NBA 2K, Red Dead, and XCOM. As of March 2018, it is the third-largest publicly traded game company in the Americas and Europe after Activision Blizzard and Electronic Arts, with an estimated market cap of US$13 billion.Take-Two was founded by Ryan Brant in September 1993, looking to become a major publisher in the video game area. The company went public in April 1997, and later acquired the publisher and developer behind Grand Theft Auto, through which it formed Rockstar Games and Rockstar North, respectively and also leading to their long-standing "label" structure. From 2003 to 2005, the company fell under investigation by the Security and Exchange Commission related to corporate and personal financial fraud after going public that led to Brant resigning by 2006 alongside the departures of other former executives and board members. As a result of this mismanagement, the company's majority shareholders led a takeover of Take-Two in March 2007, replacing them with Strauss Zelnick as the new Chairman and CEO. Take-Two subsequently rejected a US$1.9 billion buy-out from Electronic Arts in 2008. Since then, the company has continued to grow through acquisitions and creation of new studios. More recently, Take-Two created the label Private Division to support publishing from independent developers, and acquired the developer Social Point to establish itself in the mobile game market. The company also owns 50% of professional esports organization NBA 2K League.

Third-person shooter

Third-person shooter (TPS) is a subgenre of 3D shooter games in which the player character is visible on-screen during gaming, and the gameplay consists primarily of shooting.

Ubisoft

Ubisoft Entertainment SA (; French: [ybisɔft]; formerly Ubi Soft Entertainment SA) is a French video game company headquartered in Montreuil, France, with several development studios across the world. It is known for publishing games for several acclaimed video game franchises including Assassin's Creed, Far Cry, Just Dance, Prince of Persia, Rayman, Raving Rabbids, and Tom Clancy's.

As of March 2018, it is the fourth largest publicly-traded game company in the Americas and Europe after Activision Blizzard, Electronic Arts, and Take-Two Interactive in terms of revenue and market capitalisation.

Unreal Engine

The Unreal Engine is a game engine developed by Epic Games, first showcased in the 1998 first-person shooter game Unreal. Although primarily developed for first-person shooters, it has been successfully used in a variety of other genres, including stealth, fighting games, MMORPGs, and other RPGs. With its code written in C++, the Unreal Engine features a high degree of portability and is a tool used by many game developers today, with it being source-available. The most recent version is Unreal Engine 4, which was released in 2014.

Vivendi Games

Vivendi Games (formerly CUC Software, Cendant Software, Havas Interactive, Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing and Vivendi Universal Games) was an American video game publisher and holding company based in Los Angeles. The company was founded in 1996 as CUC Software, the publishing subsidiary of CUC International, after the latter acquired video game companies Davidson & Associates and Sierra On-Line. Between 1997 and 2001, the company switched parents and names multiple times before ending up organized under Vivendi Universal (later renamed Vivendi). In July 2008, Vivendi Games merged with Activision to create Activision Blizzard.

Xbox Live Arcade

Xbox Live Arcade (XBLA) is a digital video game download service available through the Xbox Games Store, Microsoft's digital distribution network for the Xbox 360. It focuses on smaller downloadable games from both major publishers and independent game developers. Titles range from classic console and arcade video games, to new games designed from the ground up for the service. Games available through the XBLA service range from $5–20 in price, and as of October 2016, there have been 719 Xbox Live Arcade titles released for the Xbox 360. Prior to the Xbox 360, "Xbox Live Arcade" was the name for an online distribution network on the original Xbox, which was replaced by the Xbox Live Marketplace.

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