Gabrielle Onguéné

Gabrielle Aboudi Onguéné (born 25 February 1989) is a footballer who currently plays for CSKA Moscow in the Russian Championship and the Cameroon national team.[3] She previously played for Rossiyanka.[4]

Gabrielle Aboudi Onguéné
AboudiOnguene
Personal information
Date of birth February 25, 1989 (age 30)
Place of birth Douala, Cameroon
Height 1.52 m (5 ft 0 in)[1]
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
CSKA Moscow
Number 57
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
Canon Yaoundé
2009–12 Louves Minproff
2012–15 Alpha Kaliningrad
2015–16 Rossiyanka 23 (12)
2017– CSKA Moscow 34 (15)
National team
2008– Cameroon 53[2] (15)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 15 June 2019
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 16:37, 23 June 2015 (UTC)

Early life

Born in Douala,[5] Aboudi Onguéné began playing football with boys in her neighborhood as a child.[4] She was spotted and recruited to play for girls' club, Ngondi Nkam Yabassi.[6][7] While playing in a tournament for the club, she was spotted by Canon Yaoundé and began playing for the team in 2005.[6]

Playing career

Club

Louves Miniproff de Yaoundé, 2009–12

Aboudi Onguéné played for Louves Miniproff de Yaoundé in the top-division Cameroonian league and helped the team win the national championship in 2009, 2010, and 2011.[7]

Rossiyanka, 2015–16

Aboudi Onguéné signed with Rossiyanka in Russia's top division league for the 2015 season. Her six goals in ten appearances ranked third in the league and helped the team finish in second place.[3] During the 2016 season, she scored 6 goals in 13 games helping the team finish first in the league with a 11–2–2 record.[3]

CSKA Moskva, 2017–

Aboudi Onguéné signed with CSKA Moscow ahead of the 2017 season. Her 9 goals in 14 appearances tied for second highest in the league.[8] The team finished in fourth place with a 9–4–1 record.[3] During the 2018 season, she scored 3 goals in 13 appearances.[3] Aboudi Onguéné scored her first goal of the 2019 season against Zvezda Perm on May 9 helping the team win 3–1.[9]

International

Aboudi Onguéné has represented Cameroon on the Cameroonian national team since 2008 after being scouted at the age of 15.[10] In 2011, she helped the team win gold at the All-Africa Games in Mozambique. During the semi-final against South Africa, she scored the game-winning goal.[11]

AboudiOnguene8
Aboudi Onguene, December 2016

Aboudi Onguéné competed at the 2012 London Olympics and scored the team's lone goal in the tournament.[1] At the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada,[2] she scored an equalizer in the team's 2–1 win over Switzerland and was named Player of the Match.[12] She was voted best player at the 2016 Africa Women Cup of Nations.[13]

As of 2018, Aboudi Onguéné has been nominated for African Women's Footballer of the Year four consecutive times.[10][14]

At the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France, Aboudi Onguéné scored an equalizer against the Netherlands during the team's second group stage match. [15]

References

  1. ^ a b "London 2012". BBC Sport.
  2. ^ a b "Profile". FIFA.com. Retrieved 23 June 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d e Profile at soccerway
  4. ^ a b Hilton Ndukong, Kimeng (17 November 2016). "Cameroon: Gabrielle Aboudi Onguéné – From Men's To Women's Football". All Africa. Retrieved 15 June 2019.
  5. ^ "Aboudi Onguene, the epitome of dribbles". Fédération Camerounaise de Football (in French). 2019-06-08. Retrieved 2019-06-15.
  6. ^ a b FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ - News - Onguene: There's no room for error - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Retrieved 2019-06-15.
  7. ^ a b Minkoo, Thierry (2018-06-12). "La saga Aboudi Onguéné continue de s'écrire". ICI Cameroun (in French). Retrieved 2019-06-15.
  8. ^ "Summary – Supreme Division Women – Russia – Results, fixtures, tables and news – Women Soccerway". www.women.soccerway.com. Retrieved 2019-06-15.
  9. ^ Correspondent. "Aboudi Onguene scores first goal of the season as CSKA Moscow pip Zvezda Perm | Goal.com". www.goal.com. Retrieved 2019-06-15.
  10. ^ a b Correspondent. "Cameroon's Gabrielle Onguene: Why I quit school to focus on football | Goal.com". www.goal.com. Retrieved 2019-06-15.
  11. ^ "Cameroon humble Banyana". News24. 2011-09-13. Retrieved 2019-06-15.
  12. ^ Reuters (2015-06-16). "Cameroon edge Switzerland to reach knockout phase of Women's World Cup". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2019-06-15.
  13. ^ "- CrTV". crtv.cm.
  14. ^ "Here are all the winners of the 2017 CAF Awards". SAFA. 2018-01-06. Retrieved 2019-06-15.
  15. ^ "LIVE Netherlands (W) – Cameroon (W) – Women's World Cup – 15 June 2019". Eurosport Australia. 2019-06-15. Retrieved 2019-06-15.

External links

2008 African Women's Championship

The 2008 Women's African Football Championship is of 15–29 November 2008 in Equatorial Guinea. The central African country is the first time host of the tournament. Eight national teams played in group matches and then against each other.

2010 African Women's Championship squads

This article describes the squads for the 2010 African Women's Championship.

2012 African Women's Championship

The 2012 African Women's Championship was a football competition, which was organized by the Confederation of African Football (CAF). The final tournament was held in from 28 October to 11 November in Equatorial Guinea.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was the seventh FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament was hosted by Canada for the first time and by a North American country for the third time. Matches were played in six cities across Canada in five time zones. The tournament began on 6 June 2015, and finished with the final on 5 July 2015 with a United States victory over Japan.

The 2015 tournament saw the World Cup expanded to 24 teams from 16 in 2011. Canada's team received direct entry as host and a qualification tournament of 134 teams was held for the remaining 23 places. With the expanded tournament, eight teams made their Women's World Cup debut. All previous Women's World Cup finalists qualified for the tournament, with defending champions Japan and returning champions Germany (2003, 2007) and the United States (1991, 1999) among the seeded teams.The 2015 tournament used goal-line technology for the first time with the Hawk-Eye system. It was also the first World Cup for either men or women to be played on artificial turf, with all matches played on such surfaces, even though there were some initial concerns over a possible increased risk of injuries.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Group C

Group C of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup consisted of Japan, Switzerland, Cameroon and Ecuador. Matches were played from 8 to 16 June 2015.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup statistics

The following article outlines the statistics for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, which took place in Canada from 6 June to 5 July.

Goals scored from penalty shoot-outs are not counted, and matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws.

2016 Africa Women Cup of Nations

The 2016 Women Africa Cup of Nations was the 12th edition of the Africa Women Cup of Nations, the biennial international football championship organised by the Confederation of African Football (CAF) for the women's national teams of Africa. The tournament was held in Cameroon between 19 November and 3 December 2016. The initial dates were 8–22 October 2016, but were changed due to weather considerations. A total of eight teams played in the tournament.On 6 August 2015, the CAF Executive Committee decided to change the name of the tournament from the African Women's Championship to the Africa Women Cup of Nations, similar to the men's version, Africa Cup of Nations.

2016 Russian Championship (women's football)

The 2016 Russian Women's Football Championship is the 25th season of the Russian women's football top level league. Zvezda 2005 Perm is the defending champion.

Rossiyanka won the season in front of Zvezda Perm.

2017 Russian Championship (women's football)

The 2017 Russian Women's Football Championship was the 26th season of the Russian women's football top level league. WFC Rossiyanka is the defending champion.

2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations

The 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations, officially known as the Total Women's Africa Cup Of Nations, Ghana 2018, was the 11th edition of the Africa Women Cup of Nations (13th edition if tournaments without hosts are included), the biennial international football championship organised by the Confederation of African Football (CAF) for the women's national teams of Africa. The tournament was held in Ghana, from 17 November to 1 December 2018.The tournament also doubles as the African qualifiers to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. The top three teams qualified for the World Cup in France.Nigeria were the defending champions. They won the tournament for their third consecutive and 11th overall Africa Women Cup of Nations title.

2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations qualification

The 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations qualification was a women's football competition which decided the participating teams of the 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations.

A total of eight teams qualified to play in the final tournament, including Ghana who qualified automatically as hosts.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

The United States entered the competition as defending champions after winning the 2015 edition in Canada and successfully defended their title with a 2–0 victory over the Netherlands in the final. In doing so, they secured their record fourth title and became the second nation, after Germany, to have successfully retained the title.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group E

Group E of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 10 to 20 June 2019. The group consisted of Cameroon, Canada, the Netherlands and New Zealand. The top two teams, the Netherlands and Canada, along with the third-placed team, Cameroon (as one of the four best third-placed teams), advanced to the round of 16.

Africa Women Cup of Nations

The Total Africa Women Cup of Nations (known as the African Women's Championship until 2015) is an international women's football competition held every two years and sanctioned by the Confederation of African Football (CAF). It was first contested in 1991, but was not held biennially until 1998. Nigeria is the most successful nation in the tournament's history, having won a record 11 titles, meaning they have won all but two of the previous tournaments. Ghana hosted the tournament in 2018.The competition has served as a qualifying tournament for the FIFA Women's World Cup every other tournament since its inception in 1991.

Cameroon at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Cameroon women's national football team has represented Cameroon at the FIFA Women's World Cup on two occasions, in 2015 and 2019.

Cameroon women's national football team

The Cameroon national women's football team, also known as the Indomitable Lionesses, is the national team of Cameroon and is controlled by the Cameroon Football Association. They finished second in the 1991, 2004, 2014, and 2016 Africa Women Cup of Nations, participated in the 2012 Olympic Games and have competed in their first ever FIFA Women's World Cup in 2015.

Football at the 2015 African Games – Women's qualification

The 2015 African Games women's football tournament qualification decided the participating teams of the 2015 African Games women's football tournament. A total of eight teams qualified to play in the women's football tournament, including Congo who qualified automatically as hosts. Both the qualifying rounds and the final tournament were open to full women's national teams (unlike the men's tournament, which was age-restricted).

List of FIFA Women's World Cup goalscorers

This article lists each country's goalscorers in the FIFA Women's World Cup. There are 373 goalscorers for the 917 goals scored at the 8 editions of the World Cup final tournaments.

17

Numbers in green means the player finished as the tournament top scorer (or joint top scorer).

WFC Rossiyanka

WFC Rossiyanka was a Russian women's football club from Khimki.

Cameroon squads

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.