Gabe Wilkins

Gabriel Nicholas Wilkins (born January 9, 1971 in Cowpens, South Carolina) is a former American Football defensive end who played for the Green Bay Packers and the San Francisco 49ers in a six-year career that lasted from 1994 to 1999 in the National Football League.[1]

Gabe Wilkins
No. 98
Position:Defensive end
Personal information
Born:January 9, 1971 (age 48)
Cowpens, South Carolina
Career information
College:Gardner–Webb
NFL Draft:1994 / Round: 4 / Pick: 126
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games Played:84
Sacks:13.5
Fumble recoveries:3
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life

He attended Gettys D. Broome High School.[2]

Collegiate career

Attending NAIA Gardner–Webb University, Wilkins recorded 29 sacks and 53 tackles for loss (both school records), and participated in the 1992 NAIA Football Championship game.[3]

Professional career

Green Bay Packers

Wilkins was selected by the Green Bay Packers in the 1994 NFL Draft (4th round, 126th overall).[4] After being used sparingly in his first three seasons, Wilkins performed well in relief of Reggie White during Super Bowl XXXI, recording a tackle and a deflected pass. Becoming a starter after Sean Jones retired in 1997, Wilkins finished the season with 50 tackles, 5.5 sacks, a 77-yard interception return touchdown, and a fumble recovery touchdown.[1] However, Wilkins played only one drive of Super Bowl XXXII due to a knee injury.[5]

San Francisco 49ers

Following the 1997 season, the San Francisco 49ers signed Wilkins to a 5-year, $20 million contract.[5] After recording 30 tackles and a sack over two years in San Francisco and being injured late in his career,[6] Wilkins retired after the 1999 season.[7]

Post-career life

Wilkins now lives in Spartanburg, South Carolina, with his wife and four kids.[8] He directed Day By Day, a 2011 mini-documentary.[9]

References

  1. ^ a b "Gabe Wilkins". pro-football-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2 August 2014.
  2. ^ "Gabe Wilkins". The Pro Football Archives. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  3. ^ "Gabe Wilkins HOF". Gardner–Webb Athletics. Retrieved 2017-01-06.
  4. ^ "1994 NFL Draft Results by Position - Defensive Ends - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2017-01-06.
  5. ^ a b DILLON, DENNIS (1998-06-14). "Moves That Don't Seem to Add Up". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2017-01-06.
  6. ^ "ESPN.com: NFL – PFW: Salary-cap lessons of Cowboys, 49ers". a.espncdn.com. Retrieved 2017-01-06.
  7. ^ "SUPER BOWL COUNTDOWN | 48: Gabe Wilkins found life's ultimate after Super Bowl triumph | American Sports Network". americansportsnet.com. Retrieved 2017-01-06.
  8. ^ "Packers.com | News | Stories | September 14, 2006: Gabe Wilkins Has Become A Dedicated Family Man". Retrieved 2017-01-06.
  9. ^ "Gabe Wilkins". IMDb. Retrieved 2017-01-06.
1994 Green Bay Packers season

The 1994 Green Bay Packers season was the team's 76th season overall and their 74th in the National Football League. The Packers posted a 9–7 record for their third straight winning season. 1994 marked the first of 8 seasons in which Packers' quarterback Brett Favre would throw more than 30 touchdown passes. It also marked the second season in which he started all 16 games for the Packers, starting a record-breaking starting streak which would continue throughout his career. This was the final season that the Packers played at Milwaukee County Stadium; they played home games exclusively at Lambeau beginning in 1995. Three Packers had the distinction of being named to the NFL's All-Time 75th Anniversary Team: Reggie White, Don Hutson, and Ray Nitschke. After defeating the Detroit Lions 16–12 in the NFC Wild Card Game, the season ended in a 35–9 loss to the Dallas Cowboys in an NFC Divisional Playoff Game.Despite another stellar season, Brett Favre, for the first time in his career, was not eligible for the Pro Bowl.

1994 NFL Draft

The 1994 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 24–25, 1994, at the Marriot Marquis in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season. This was the first draft in which the rounds were reduced to seven in total.

The highlight of ESPN's coverage of this draft was a verbal altercation between ESPN draft expert Mel Kiper, Jr. and Indianapolis Colts' GM Bill Tobin. While disputing the Colts pick of linebacker Trev Alberts of Nebraska (when Kiper felt a quarterback such as Trent Dilfer made more sense), Tobin famously said to the ESPN crew "Who in the hell is Mel Kiper, anyway? I mean, here's a guy who criticizes everybody, whoever they take. In my knowledge of him, he's never even put on a jockstrap, he's never been a player, he's never been a coach, he's never been a scout, he's never been an administrator, and all of a sudden, he's an expert. Mel Kiper has no more credentials to do what he's doing than my neighbor, and my neighbor's a postman and he doesn't even have season tickets to the NFL." Alberts is considered a draft bust with just four sacks in three seasons; Dilfer, although never a star, had a productive career, including game-managing the Baltimore Ravens to a win in Super Bowl XXXV several years after being drafted.

This was also the final draft for both Los Angeles football teams for over two decades; by the 1995 draft, the Raiders had returned to Oakland and the Rams began a 21-year tenancy in St. Louis.

1995 Green Bay Packers season

The 1995 Green Bay Packers season was their 77th season overall and their 75th in the National Football League. The Packers obtained an 11–5 mark in the regular season and won the NFC Central, their first division title since 1972. In the playoffs, the Packers defeated the Atlanta Falcons at home and the defending champion San Francisco 49ers on the road before losing to the Dallas Cowboys in the NFC Championship Game. Packers' quarterback Brett Favre was named the NFL's Most Valuable Player, the first of three such awards he would win.

This was the first season that the Packers played home games exclusively at Lambeau Field, after playing part of their home slate at Milwaukee County Stadium since 1953. After losing their home opener to St. Louis, the Packers would win an NFL-record 25 consecutive home games between the rest of 1995 and early in 1998.

1996 Green Bay Packers season

The 1996 Green Bay Packers season was their 78th season overall and their 76th in the National Football League, which culminated with the franchise winning its third Super Bowl and league-record 12th NFL Championship. The Packers posted a league-best 13–3 regular season won-loss record, going 8–0 at home and 5–3 on the road. It was the first time since 1962 that the club went undefeated at home. Additionally, the Packers had the NFL's highest-scoring offense (456) and allowed the fewest points on defense (210). Green Bay was the first team to accomplish both feats in the same season since the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins. They finished the season with the number one ranked offense, defense, and special teams. They also set a then NFL record for the fewest touchdowns allowed in a 16-game season, with 19. The Packers also allowed the fewest yards in the NFL and set a record for punt return yardage. Brett Favre won his second straight MVP award while also throwing for a career-high and league leading 39 touchdown passes.

In the postseason, the Packers defeated the San Francisco 49ers in the divisional round and the Carolina Panthers in the NFC Championship Game. Green Bay beat the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXI to win their third Super Bowl and twelfth NFL Championship.In 2007, the 1996 Packers were ranked as the 16th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions. The 1996 Packers were ranked 6th-greatest Super Bowl team of all-time by a similar panel done by ESPN and released in 2007. As of 2019, the Packers are the only team since the implementation of the salary cap to score the most points and allow the fewest in the regular season.

1997 Green Bay Packers season

The 1997 Green Bay Packers season was their 79th season overall and their 77th in the National Football League. The season concluded with the team winning its second consecutive NFC championship, but losing in a 31–24 upset to John Elway's Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XXXII. The team narrowly missed its opportunity to post back-to-back Super Bowl wins.

After a dominating 1996 campaign which ended with a victory in Super Bowl XXXI, many expected the Packers to repeat as champions in 1997. During training camp, star safety LeRoy Butler, among others, said that the Packers had the chance to run the table and go 19–0. This opinion drew increased coverage from the media as the Packers notched impressive victories in all five preseason games. The undefeated hype ended quickly, however, when Green Bay lost week 2 in Philadelphia.

Following a relatively slow 3–2 start, the Packers caught fire in the second half of the season, finishing with a 13–3 regular season record and 8–0 home record for the second consecutive year. In the playoffs, Green Bay defeated the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Lambeau Field in the divisional round, and San Francisco 49ers at 3Com Park in the NFC Championship. Some in the media dubbed the NFC title game as "the real Super Bowl" because of the 49ers' and Packers' league dominance, and the relative inferiority of the AFC in recent Super Bowls. Green Bay's win marked the third consecutive year the team had defeated San Francisco in the playoffs.

The Packers entered Super Bowl XXXII as 11 1/2-point favorites. The point spread was likely determined by Green Bay's victory in the previous Super Bowl, the AFC's string of 13 consecutive Super Bowl losses, and Denver's losses in four previous Super Bowls. The game itself was a seesaw battle, and one of the most exciting Super Bowls in history. The Broncos won the thriller 31–24, earning John Elway his first Super Bowl victory at the age of 37, and the first championship in franchise history. Years later, Brett Favre said the Broncos were far underrated, and credited Denver's innovative blitz packages and strategies, foreign to the league at that time, for confusing the Packers.

Packers' quarterback Brett Favre was named the league's MVP for the third year in a row in 1997. Favre was the first player in the history of the award to win three MVPs, and remains the only player to have won three MVPs consecutively. The Packers became the first team to have six NFL MVP award winners.The 1997 Packers are one of only two teams in NFL history to win seven games against teams that would go on to make the playoffs.

1998 Green Bay Packers season

The 1998 Green Bay Packers season was their 80th season overall and their 78th in the National Football League. It ended with a 30–27 loss in the NFC Wild Card Game to the San Francisco 49ers, with Steve Young throwing a 25-yard touchdown pass to Terrell Owens with three seconds left. The season marked the end of an era in many ways for Green Bay; this was the last season for which both head coach Mike Holmgren and Hall of Fame defensive end Reggie White would find themselves on the Packers' sideline. This was the first time the Packers had not won the division in four years. In addition, the Minnesota Vikings brought an end to the Packers 25 game home winning streak in Week 5.

1998 was the final season that the Packers would qualify for the postseason during the 1990s. They would not return to the playoffs until 2001.

1998 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1998 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 49th year with the National Football League.

The season saw the return of Jerry Rice, who missed most of 1997 with a major knee injury.

After defeating the Packers in the Wildcard round, thanks to a game-winning catch by young Terrell Owens, San Francisco's season ended with a defeat to the Atlanta Falcons the following week. The Falcons then defeated the 15–1 Minnesota Vikings in the title game, but they lost to the Denver Broncos in the Super Bowl.

The Divisional round was Steve Young's final playoff appearance as he suffered a concussion in Week 3 of the next season, ending his 15-year NFL career.

1999 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1999 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 50th year with the National Football League. This would also be Steve Young's last season as he was forced to retire due to concussions.

San Francisco started the season with a 3–1 record, but Young suffered his season- and career-ending concussion against the Arizona Cardinals in Week 3. After defeating the Cardinals and the Tennessee Titans without Young, the 49ers went on to lose ten of the remaining eleven games of the season. It was the first time the team had missed the postseason since 1991, their second time missing the postseason in 17 seasons, and their first losing season (excluding the strike shortened 1982 season, as well as their first season without at least 10 wins) since 1980.

Statistics site Football Outsiders calculates that the 1999 49ers had the second-worst pass defense they had ever tracked.

Gardner–Webb Runnin' Bulldogs

The Gardner–Webb Runnin' Bulldogs are the athletic teams that represent Gardner–Webb University, located in Boiling Springs, North Carolina. Gardner–Webb participates in 21 varsity sports at the NCAA Division I level. The school's programs are a part of the Big South Conference.

Gardner–Webb has also produced many notable athletes and coaches, including: Artis Gilmore, Gerry Vaillancourt, John Drew, Eddie Lee Wilkins, Jim Washburn, Blake Lalli, Jim Maxwell, Gabe Wilkins, Cara Saunders, and Brian Johnston.

Gardner–Webb Runnin' Bulldogs football

The Gardner–Webb Runnin' Bulldogs football program is the intercollegiate American football team for Gardner–Webb University in the U.S. state of North Carolina. The team competes in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) and are members of the Big South Conference. Gardner–Webb's first football team was fielded in 1970. The team plays its home games at the 9,000-seat Ernest W. Spangler Stadium in Boiling Springs, North Carolina. The Runnin' Bulldogs are coached by Carroll McCray.

Gardner–Webb University

Gardner–Webb University (Gardner–Webb, GWU, or GW) is a private Baptist university in Boiling Springs, North Carolina. Founded as Boiling Springs High School in 1905 as a Baptist institution, it is currently the youngest North Carolina Baptist university. It is affiliated with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina.Over 4,500 students attend Gardner–Webb, including both undergraduates and graduates. A total of five professional schools, two academic schools, and 11 academic departments offer nearly 60 fields of study, and GWU's online programs have won multiple awards and recognitions. GWU's Runnin' Bulldogs compete in NCAA Division I as a member of the Big South Conference.

Green Bay Packers draft history

This page is a list of the Green Bay Packers NFL Draft selections. The Packers have participated in every NFL draft since it began in 1936, in which they made Russ Letlow their first-ever selection.

List of San Francisco 49ers players

These players have appeared in at least one regular season or postseason game for the San Francisco 49ers NFL franchise.

Super Bowl XXXII

Super Bowl XXXII was an American football game played between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion and defending Super Bowl XXXI champion Green Bay Packers and the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Denver Broncos to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1997 season. The Broncos defeated the Packers by the score of 31–24. The game was played on January 25, 1998 at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, California, the second time that the Super Bowl was held in that city. Super Bowl XXXII also made Qualcomm Stadium the only stadium in history to have the Super Bowl and the World Series in the same year.

This was Denver's first league championship after suffering four previous Super Bowl losses, and snapped a 13-game losing streak for AFC teams in the Super Bowl (the previous being the Los Angeles Raiders' win in Super Bowl XVIII after the 1983 season). The Broncos, who entered the game after posting a 12–4 regular season record in 1997, became just the second wild card team to win a Super Bowl and the first since the Raiders in Super Bowl XV. The Packers, who entered the game as the defending Super Bowl XXXI champions after posting a 13–3 regular season record, were the first team favored to win by double digits to lose a Super Bowl since Super Bowl IV.

The game was close throughout much of the contest. The Broncos converted two turnovers to take a 17–7 lead in the second quarter before the Packers cut the score to 17–14 at halftime. Green Bay kept pace with Denver in the second half, before tying the game with 13:32 remaining. Both defenses stiffened until Broncos running back Terrell Davis scored the go-ahead touchdown with 1:45 left. Despite suffering a migraine headache that caused him to miss most of the second quarter, Davis (a San Diego native) was named Super Bowl MVP. He ran for 157 yards, caught two passes for 8 yards, and scored a Super Bowl record three rushing touchdowns.

Wilkins (surname)

Wilkins is a surname.

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