G.O.G. 666

G.O.G. 666 is a science fiction novel by author John Taine (pseudonym of Eric Temple Bell). It was first published in 1954 by Fantasy Press in an edition of 1,815 copies.

G.O.G. 666
Gog 666
Dust-jacket from the first edition
AuthorJohn Taine
Cover artistJohn T. Brooks
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience fiction novel
PublisherFantasy Press
Publication date
1954
Media typePrint (hardback)
Pages256 pp
OCLC1625086

Plot introduction

The novel concerns Russian genetics experiments resulting in a being that is half ape, half brain.

Reception

Anthony Boucher received the novel unfavorably, describing it as "slow and muddled" and saying that "Neither story nor science can stand comparison with Taine's best work."[1] P. Schuyler Miller reported that "it's not the best Taine."[2] New Worlds reviewer Leslie Flood dismissed the novel as "science-fiction of the most boring and tasteless sort", saying "this literary lapse of a once-great fantasy author should have suffered the oblivion it deserved, had it not been for the overenthusiasm of a specialist science-fiction press".[3]

References

  1. ^ "Recommended Reading," F&SF, September 1954, p.93.
  2. ^ "The Reference Library", Astounding Science Fiction, January 1955, p.153
  3. ^ "Book Reviews", New Worlds, February 1956, p.126
  • Chalker, Jack L.; Mark Owings (1998). The Science-Fantasy Publishers: A Bibliographic History, 1923-1998. Westminster, MD and Baltimore: Mirage Press, Ltd. p. 240.
  • Tuck, Donald H. (1974). The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy. Chicago: Advent. p. 36. ISBN 0-911682-20-1.
Eric Temple Bell

Eric Temple Bell (February 7, 1883 – December 21, 1960) was a Scottish-born mathematician and science fiction writer who lived in the United States for most of his life. He published non-fiction using his given name and fiction as John Taine.

Fantasy Press

Fantasy Press was an American publishing house specialising in fantasy and science fiction titles. Established in 1946 by Lloyd Arthur Eshbach in Reading, Pennsylvania, it was most notable for publishing the works of authors such as Robert A. Heinlein and E. E. Smith. One of its more notable offerings was the Lensman series.

Among its books was Of Worlds Beyond: The Science of Science Fiction Writing (1947), which was the first book about modern SF and contained essays by John W. Campbell, Jr., Robert A. Heinlein, A. E. van Vogt and others.

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