From Other Worlds

From Other Worlds is an anthology of science fiction stories edited by American writer August Derleth. It was first published by Four Square Books in 1964. The anthology contains seven stories from Derleth's earlier anthology, Beachheads in Space. The stories had originally appeared in the magazines Astounding Stories, Amazing Stories, Startling Stories, Weird Tales and Planet Stories.

From Other Worlds
From other worlds
Cover of the first edition
EditorAugust Derleth
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience fiction short stories
PublisherFour Square Books
Publication date
1964
Media typePrint (paperback)
Pages184

Contents

Sources

  • Contento, William G. "Index to Science Fiction Anthologies and Collections". Archived from the original on 2007-12-22. Retrieved 2008-01-08.
  • Tuck, Donald H. (1974). The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy. Chicago: Advent. pp. 138–139. ISBN 0-911682-20-1.
Apokolips

Apokolips is a fictional planet appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The planet is ruled by Darkseid, established in Jack Kirby's Fourth World comic book series, and is integral to many stories in the DC Universe. Apokolips is considered to be the opposite of the planet New Genesis.Apokolips is a large planet covered entirely by a city (an ecumenopolis). The war that destroyed the Old Gods and created New Genesis and Apokolips separated the Fourth World from the rest of the universe, leaving it only accessible by a form of travel called a boom tube.

The boom tube, it has been revealed, converts individuals that pass through to proportions fitting the destination, i.e., when a New God passes from Apokolips (or New Genesis) to Earth, they are shrunken in size, while someone going the other way would grow larger. If someone somehow reaches the Fourth World by other means, he will discover that its denizens are giants.

Baldr

Baldr (also Balder, Baldur) is a god in Norse mythology, and a son of the god Odin and the goddess Frigg. He has numerous brothers, such as Thor and Váli.

In the 12th century, Danish accounts by Saxo Grammaticus and other Danish Latin chroniclers recorded a euhemerized account of his story. Compiled in Iceland in the 13th century, but based on much older Old Norse poetry, the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda contain numerous references to the death of Baldr as both a great tragedy to the Æsir and a harbinger of Ragnarök.

According to Gylfaginning, a book of Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda, Baldr's wife is Nanna and their son is Forseti. In Gylfaginning, Snorri relates that Baldr had the greatest ship to ever be built, named Hringhorni, and that there is no place more beautiful than his hall, Breidablik.

Barry Strugatz

Barry Strugatz is an American film director and screenwriter.

Beachheads in Space

Beachheads in Space is an anthology of science fiction stories edited by American writer August Derleth. It was first published by Pellegrini & Cudahy in 1952. Many of the stories had originally appeared in the magazines Astounding Stories, Fantastic Adventures, Science Fiction Adventures, Amazing Stories, Startling Stories, Weird Tales, Planet Stories and Blue Book. Seven of the stories were reprinted again in Derleth's 1964 anthology From Other Worlds.

Beneath the Gated Sky

Beneath the Gated Sky is a science-fiction novel by Robert Reed, first published in 1997. It describes a world in which the sky undergoes a transformation that prevents people from seeing the stars, giving them instead a view of the other side of the world, as if the Earth had been turned inside out. The entire universe seems to have been rebuilt by an intelligence so that each body of matter exists in a structure that connects all matter together allowing travel between worlds using "quantum intrusions". The intrusions only allow minds, or as some would maintain, souls to pass through, emerging on the other side as a fully formed member of whatever species exists on the new world.

The novel is a sequel to Beyond the Veil of Stars, and follows that novel's protagonists, Cornell Novak and Porsche Neal, as they deal with their new relationship, the secret activities of the government agency that they worked for, and the possibility that some visitors from other worlds are working to destroy human society so they can take over.

Birthright (The Outer Limits)

"Birthright" is an episode of The Outer Limits television show. It first aired on 13 August 1995, during the first season.

Cara Buono

Cara Buono is an American actress. Her roles include Dr. Faye Miller in the fourth season of the AMC drama series Mad Men, Kelli Moltisanti in the sixth season of The Sopranos, Linda Salvo in the 2006 comedy Artie Lange's Beer League, and Karen Wheeler in the 2016 horror sci-fi Netflix original series Stranger Things. She has appeared in such films as Hulk (2003) and Let Me In (2010).

Fire Emblem Warriors

Fire Emblem Warriors is a hack and slash role-playing video game developed by Omega Force and Team Ninja, and published by Koei Tecmo in Japan and Nintendo internationally for the Nintendo Switch and New Nintendo 3DS. The game was released in Japan in September 2017, and worldwide the following month. The game is a collaboration between Koei Tecmo's Dynasty Warriors franchise and Intelligent Systems' Fire Emblem series.

The game received generally positive reviews, with critics praising the combination of Fire Emblem and Dynasty Warriors gameplay and drawing favorable comparisons to Hyrule Warriors, released in 2014 for the Wii U. Criticism focused on the game's roster and similarity to other Dynasty Warriors games.

Flying Saucers (magazine)

Flying Saucers was a monthly magazine published and edited by Raymond A. Palmer, devoted to articles on UFOs and the Shaver Mystery.

Melissa Leo

Melissa Chessington Leo (born September 14, 1960) is an American actress.

After appearing on several television shows and films in the 1980s, Leo became a regular on the television shows All My Children, which won her a Daytime Emmy Award and The Young Riders. Her breakthrough role came in 1993 as Det. Sgt. Kay Howard on the television series Homicide: Life on the Street (1993–97).

Leo received critical acclaim for her performance as Ray Eddy in the 2008 film Frozen River, earning her several nominations and awards, including an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. In 2010, Leo won several awards for her performance as Alice Eklund-Ward in the film The Fighter, including the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

In 2013, she won an Emmy Award for her guest role on the television series Louie. She starred in the 2015 Fox event series Wayward Pines as Nurse Pam. She then starred in the 2017 Netflix film The Most Hated Woman in America as American Atheists founder Madalyn Murray O'Hair.

Men in black

In popular culture and UFO conspiracy theories, men in black (MIB) are supposed men dressed in black suits who claim to be quasi-government agents who harass or threaten UFO witnesses to keep them quiet about what they have seen. It is sometimes implied that they may be aliens themselves. The term is also frequently used to describe mysterious men working for unknown organizations, as well as various branches of government allegedly designed to protect secrets or perform other strange activities. The term is generic, used for any unusual, threatening or strangely behaved individual whose appearance on the scene can be linked in some fashion with a UFO sighting. Several alleged encounters with the men in black have been reported by UFO researchers and enthusiasts.

Stories about allegedly real-life men in black inspired the semi-comic science fiction Men in Black franchise of comic books, films, and other media.

Mímir

Mímir (Old Norse "The rememberer, the wise one") or Mimir is a figure in Norse mythology, renowned for his knowledge and wisdom, who is beheaded during the Æsir-Vanir War. Afterward, the god Odin carries around Mímir's head and it recites secret knowledge and counsel to him.

Mímir is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson of Iceland, and in euhemerized form as one of the Æsir in Heimskringla, also written by Snorri Sturluson in the 13th century. Mímir's name appears in the names of the well Mímisbrunnr, the tree Mímameiðr, and the wood Hoddmímis holt. Scholars have proposed that Bestla may be Mímir's sister, and therefore Odin's uncle.

Other Worlds, Universe Science Fiction, and Science Stories

Other Worlds, Universe Science Fiction, and Science Stories were three related US magazines edited by Raymond A. Palmer. Other Worlds was launched in November 1949 by Palmer's Clark Publications and lasted for four years in its first run, with well-received stories such as "Enchanted Village" by A. E. van Vogt and "Way in the Middle of the Air", one of Ray Bradbury's "Martian Chronicle" stories. Since Palmer was both publisher and editor, he was free to follow his own editorial policy, and presented a wide array of science fiction.

Palmer entered a partnership with a Chicago businessman in 1953 to create Bell Publications, and printed Universe Science Fiction from June 1953. Palmer used the new company to abandon Other Worlds and launch Science Stories, in order to escape from Clark Publications' financial difficulties. Hence Science Stories can be considered a continuation of Other Worlds. Science Stories was visually attractive but contained no memorable fiction. Universe, on the other hand, was drab in appearance, but included some well-received stories, such as Theodore Sturgeon's "The World Well Lost", which examined homosexuality, a controversial topic for the time.

Palmer's Chicago partner lost interest, so he took over both Science Stories and Universe Science Fiction under a new company. In 1955 he culled both magazines and brought back Other Worlds, numbering the issues to make the new magazine appear a continuation of both the original Other Worlds and also of Universe. In this new incarnation the magazine was less successful, but did print Marion Zimmer Bradley's first novel, Falcons of Narabedla. In 1957 Palmer changed the focus of the magazine to unidentified flying objects (UFOs), retitling it Flying Saucers from Other Worlds, and after the September 1957 issue no more fiction appeared. Palmer eventually settled on Flying Saucers, Mysteries of the Space Age as the title, and in that form it survived until June 1976.

Reginnaglar

Reginnaglar (singular reginnagli) is a word occurring twice in Old Norse. Its meaning is unclear but it is a compound of reginn, "powers/rulers/gods/sacred" and naglar, "nails". Despite its rarity, the word has occasioned quite extensive scholarly debate because it may give insight into Norse mythology.

Robert Downey Sr.

Robert John Downey Sr. (born Robert Elias Jr.; June 24, 1935) is a retired American actor, director, producer, writer and cinematographer, and the father of actor Robert Downey Jr. He is best known for writing and directing the underground film Putney Swope, a satire on the New York Madison Avenue advertising world. According to film scholar Wheeler Winston Dixon, the elder Downey's films during the 1960s were "strictly take-no-prisoners affairs, with minimal budgets and outrageous satire, effectively pushing forward the countercultural agenda of the day."

Sanat Kumara

According to the post-1900 publications of Theosophy, Lord Sunat Kumara is an "Advanced Being" at the Ninth level of initiation who is regarded as the 'Lord' or 'Regent' of Earth and of the humanity, and is thought to be the head of the Spiritual Hierarchy of Earth who dwells in Shamballah (also known as 'The City of Enoch').

Shamballah is said by the adherents to the Ascended Master Teachings, to be a floating city manifested on the etheric plane somewhere above the Gobi Desert in the borderlands of Mongolia.The Great White Brotherhood is a spiritual 'fraternity' of Ascended Beings, including Lord Sunat Kumara, long since dedicated to the eventual Salvation of Mankind and the establishment of Divine Law again in this Three-dimensional reality.

According to Elizabeth Van Buren, the Brotherhood once maintained (earthly) headquarters hidden in a remote valley near a sacred lake in old Tibet, until relatively recently, when, possibly due to the surmised threat of Communist China, they withdrew, allegedly through subterranean tunnels to an alternative earthly location in Peru, where they are still reported as having an earth base (circa 1985).These authors believe that Lord Sunat Kumara is the founder of the Great White Brotherhood, composed of Masters of the Ancient Wisdom (called in the Ascended Master Teachings Ascended Masters) and volunteers from other worlds who have joined together to advance spiritual evolution on Earth.

The War of the Worlds

The War of the Worlds is a science fiction novel by English author H. G. Wells, first serialised in 1897 by Pearson's Magazine in the UK and by Cosmopolitan magazine in the US. The novel's first appearance in hardcover was in 1898 from publisher William Heinemann of London. Written between 1895 and 1897, it is one of the earliest stories to detail a conflict between mankind and an extraterrestrial race. The novel is the first-person narrative of both an unnamed protagonist in Surrey and of his younger brother in London as southern England is invaded by Martians. The novel is one of the most commented-on works in the science fiction canon.The plot has been related to invasion literature of the time. The novel has been variously interpreted as a commentary on evolutionary theory, British imperialism, and generally Victorian superstitions, fears, and prejudices. At the time of publication, it was classified as a scientific romance, like Wells's earlier novel The Time Machine. The War of the Worlds has been both popular (having never been out of print) and influential, spawning half a dozen feature films, radio dramas, a record album, various comic book adaptations, a television series, and sequels or parallel stories by other authors. It was most memorably dramatized in a 1938 radio program that allegedly caused public panic among listeners who did not know the Martian invasion was fictional.

The novel has even influenced the work of scientists, notably Robert H. Goddard, who, inspired by the book, invented both the liquid fuelled rocket and multistage rocket, which resulted in the Apollo 11 Moon landing 71 years later.

Web (novel)

Web is a science fiction novel written by the English science fiction author John Wyndham. The novel was published by the estate of John Wyndham in 1979, ten years after his death.

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