French Football Federation

The French Football Federation (FFF) (French: Fédération Française de Football) is the governing body of football in France. It also includes the overseas departments (Guadeloupe, French Guiana, Martinique, Mayotte and Réunion) and the overseas collectivities (New Caledonia, French Polynesia, Wallis and Futuna, Saint Pierre and Miquelon and Saint Barthélemy-Saint Martin) and also in Monaco. It was formed in 1919 and is based in the capital, Paris. The FFF was a founding member of FIFA and is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the game of football in France, both professional and amateur. The French Football Force is a founding member of UEFA and joined FIFA in 1907 after replacing the USFSA, who were founding members.[1]

French Football Federation
UEFA
French Football Federation logo
Founded7 April 1919
HeadquartersParis
FIFA affiliation1904 as USFSA
UEFA affiliation1954
PresidentNoël Le Graët
WebsiteOfficial site

History

The Fédération Française de Football was formed on 7 April 1919 following the transformation of the Comité Français Interfédéral (CFI) into the Fédération Française de Football Association (FFFA). The CFI were seen as a rival organization to the Union des Sociétés Françaises de Sports Athlétiques (USFSA) due to the organization's constantly disagreeing with each other, mainly due to the latter's opposition to professionalism in sport. Following the debacle at the 1908 Summer Olympics, in which France sent two teams, one controlled by the USFSA and another by FIFA, the CFI ruled that FIFA would now be responsible for the club's appearances in forthcoming Olympic Games and not the USFSA. Being a founding member of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the USFSA disagreed with the ruling and, despite having three years to reach an agreement, the CFI and the USFSA failed to, which led to France not sending a football team to the 1912 Summer Olympics. The USFSA later developed friction with FIFA and the IOC, which led to disorganization and in 1913, became semi-affiliated with the CFI.

On 7 April 1919, the CFI transformed themselves into the Fédération Française de Football with Jules Rimet being installed as the federation's first president. Its legal status is placed under the French Association loi de 1901 jurisdiction (Voluntary association). The FFF has been affiliated to FIFA since 1907, when the CFI succeeded the USFSA as France's representative. Two years later after the CFI's transformation, the USFSA officially merged with the federation.

On 28 June 2010, the federation's current president, Jean-Pierre Escalettes, announced his resignation from his position effective 23 July.[2] On 23 July, Fernand Duchaussoy was installed as the federation's interim president and, on 18 December, the title was removed making him the federation's 11th president in its history.[3] On 18 June 2011, following as election, Nöel Le Graët was named as the federation's 12th president.[4]

Activities

The French Football Force describes itself in four roles:

The FFF sanctions all competitive football matches in France, either directly, beginning with the Championnat National on down, or indirectly through the Ligue de Football Professionnel, who manage Ligue 1 and Ligue 2, the first and second divisions of France, respectively, as well as the Coupe de la Ligue. The LFP, however, still operate under the authority of the federation. The federation is also responsible for appointing the management of the men's, women's and youth national football teams. In 2010, the FFF had 2,107,924 licenses, with over 1,800,000 registered players and 18,000 registered clubs.[5] The federation unveiled its new crest (above right) in 2007.

The French Football Force runs numerous competitions, the most famous of which is the annual Coupe de France. The Coupe de France is managed under the authority of the Federal Commission of the Coupe de France, which is directly attached to the Federal Council of the FFF. The federation also organizes the championships of the semi-professional and amateur leagues, such as the Championnat National, the Championnat de France amateur and Championnat de France amateur 2, and the regional and departmental leagues, as well as the latter's cup competitions.

The federation also governs youth leagues, such as the Championnat National of the under-19s and under-17s. The FFF also oversee the organization of the Coupe Gambardella and the Coupe Nationale for the under-15 and under-13 club teams. The federation organizes all three divisions of women's football in France and oversee the Challenge de France, the women's premier cup competition.

Federal Council

Member Role Notes
Fernand Duchaussoy President Named as interim president on 23 July 2010. Title was removed on 18 December.
Noël Le Graët Vice-President
Gervais Martel Vice-President Serves as chairman of Ligue 2 club RC Lens.
Jacques Rousselot Vice-President Serves as chairman of Ligue 1 club AS Nancy.
Christian Teinturier Vice-President
Jacques Léger Vice-President Also serves as President of the Ligue de Bourgogne (Burgundy)
Marc Riolacci Vice-President Also serves as President of the Ligue du Corse (Corsica)
Frédéric Thiriez Vice-President Also serves as President of the Ligue de Football Professionnel.
Bernard Désumer Treasurer
Henri Monteil General secretary
Guy Chambily Chairman of Supervisory committee
Bernard Saules Referee representative Serves as President of the National Union of Referees
René Charrier UNFP representative
Marilou Duringer-Erckert Professional women's players representative
Pierre Rochcongar Doctor
François Ponthieu Member
Jean-Marc Puissesseau Member
Jacques Thébault Member
Jean-Marie Lawniczak Member

Academies

The French Football Force operates 14 élite academies throughout the country of France, the most famous being Le Centre Technique National Fernand Sastre, or simply Clairefontaine, which was created by former FFF president Fernand Sastre in 1976. Located 50 km southwest of Paris in Clairefontaine-en-Yvelines, Clairefontaine is arguably the finest football academy in the world. It has a high reputation of producing some of the most gifted French players including Nicolas Anelka, Louis Saha, William Gallas and national team top scorer Thierry Henry.

Registration

In order for a player to be selected to an academy, he/she must be at least 13 years of age, have French citizenship, and be living and playing within the region of the academy the player is registering for. Registration for new players at an academy normally begins in October the year before players enroll at the academy when prospective applicants are 12 years of age. Players have until December to register with their club for acceptance into the academy. The first set of trials are carried out by each district within its respective region. Each district selects a set number of players who will traveled to the region's academy to attend a tryout, which is usually held over a three-day period. The dates of the tryouts vary depending on the academy. The Clairefontaine academy normally hold its tryouts during the Easter school holidays, however the academy in Châteauroux holds its tryouts in June. After the three days, the academy director and officials will convene to select a maximum of 22 players with three or four of the 22 being goalkeepers. The number of players selected also vary depending on the academy.

Training and accommodation

Players who are selected to attend an academy stay and train at the facilities from Monday through Friday. Players are given the weekend off to go and visit family and, also, to train and play with their parent clubs. They are given school holidays off, as well. Players are also required to meet educational criteria. For example, players age 13–15 training at Clairefontaine attend the Collège Catherine de Vivonne de Rambouilet in Rambouillet. After departing Rambouilet, players enroll at the nearby high school Lycée Louis Bascan de Rambouillet with hopes that they will earn their Baccalauréat. All costs required to attend an academy are borne by the federation and the Ligue Nationale de Football.[6]

Academy Location Notes
CREPS de Aquitaine Talence Trains players exclusively brought up in Aquitaine.
Centre de Préformation de Football Liévin Trains players exclusively brought up in Nord-Pas-de-Calais.
Pôle Espoir de Castelmaurou Castelmaurou Trains players exclusively brought up in the Midi-Pyrénées.
Clairefontaine Clairefontaine-en-Yvelines Trains players exclusively brought up in Île-de-France.
IFR Châteauroux Châteauroux Trains players exclusively brought up in Centre.
Pôle Espoir de Dijon Dijon Trains players exclusively brought up in Burgundy.
Pôle Espoir de la Guadeloupe Guadeloupe Trains players exclusively brought up in the French Caribbean
Pôle Espoir de Marseille Marseille Trains players exclusively brought up in and around Méditerranée.
PEF Ploufragan Ploufragan Trains players exclusively brought up in Brittany.
CREPS de Reims Reims Trains players exclusively brought up in Champagne-Ardenne.
CREPS La Réunion Réunion Trains players exclusively brought up in Réunion and nearby territories.
PEF Saint-Sébastien-sur-Loire Saint-Sébastien-sur-Loire Trains players exclusively brought up in Pays de la Loire.
Pôle Espoir de Vichy Vichy Trains players exclusively brought up in Auvergne.

Sponsors

References

  1. ^ "De nouveaux logos pour la FFF". fff.fr. 2018-07-25. Archived from the original on 2018-07-30. Retrieved 2018-07-30.
  2. ^ "Escalettes démissionne!". France Football. 28 June 2010. Archived from the original on 29 June 2010. Retrieved 28 June 2010.
  3. ^ "Fernand Duchaussoy élu". French Football Federation. 18 December 2010. Retrieved 19 December 2010.
  4. ^ "Nöel Le Graët élu Président". French Football Federation. 18 June 2011. Retrieved 18 June 2011.
  5. ^ Licenses of the French Football Federation
  6. ^ "Les conditions d'inscription". French Football Federation. 6 November 2010. Archived from the original on 4 November 2010. Retrieved 20 November 2010.

External links

2010–11 Coupe de France

The 2010–11 Coupe de France was the 94th season of France's most prestigious cup competition. The competition was organized by the French Football Federation (FFF) and was open to all clubs in French football, as well as clubs from the overseas departments and territories (Guadeloupe, French Guiana, Martinique, Mayotte, New Caledonia, French Polynesia and Réunion). The final was contested on 14 May 2011 at the Stade de France. The defending champions were Paris Saint-Germain, who defeated Monaco 1–0 in the final of the 2009–10 edition. The winner of the competition will qualify for the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League and will be inserted into the Playoff round.

The competition officially began on 11 August 2010 with the start of the first round beginning play in the Alsace region (most regions began play the following weekend), however, qualification matches for the tournament had been in commencement since January 2010 with overseas regions and collectivities such as New Caledonia having its national cup competition served as a qualifying tournament for the Coupe de France. On 2 March 2011, the last amateur club in the competition, Chambéry, who are currently playing in the Championnat de France amateur 2, the fifth level of French football, were eliminated after losing 3–0 to Ligue 2 club Angers in the quarterfinals. Chambéry's stint in the competition was notable due in part to the club being the first amateur club in Coupe de France history to defeat three Ligue 1 clubs. On 15 April, Chambéry were awarded the Petit Poucet Plaque, an award given to the best performing amateur club in the Coupe de France.On 14 May 2011, first division club Lille defeated the defending champions Paris Saint-Germain 1–0 in the 2011 Coupe de France Final courtesy of a late second half goal from Ludovic Obraniak to win the Coupe de France title. The title is the club's first domestically since winning the Coupe de France in over 56 years ago.

2011 Coupe de France Final

The 2011 Coupe de France Final was the 93rd final of France's most prestigious football cup competition. The final took place on 14 May 2011 at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis and was contested between Paris Saint-Germain and Lille. Paris Saint-Germain were the defending champions of the competition and it was the third time in the club's history that it had appeared in back-to-back finals. The winner of the Coupe de France is guaranteed a place in the playoff round of the UEFA Europa League with the club's appearance being dependent on whether it qualifies for the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League. The final was broadcast live on France 2.

Lille defeated the defending champions Paris Saint-Germain 1–0 in the 2011 Coupe de France Final courtesy of a late second half goal from Ludovic Obraniak to win the Coupe de France title. This was the club's first domestic trophy since winning the Coupe de France 56 years earlier. Later that month, Lille completed the domestic double by winning the Ligue 1 title.

2011–12 Coupe de France

The 2011–12 Coupe de France was the 95th season of the most prestigious cup competition of France. The competition was organized by the French Football Federation (FFF) and open to all clubs in French football, as well as clubs from the overseas departments and territories (Guadeloupe, French Guiana, Martinique, Mayotte, New Caledonia, French Polynesia, and Réunion). The final was contested on 28 April 2012 at the Stade de France. The defending champions were Lille, who defeated Paris Saint-Germain 1–0 in the final of the 2010–11 season. The winner of the competition qualified for the group stage of the 2012–13 UEFA Europa League.On 28 April 2012, first division club Lyon defeated semi-professional third-tier Quevilly 1–0 in the 2012 Coupe de France Final courtesy of a first half goal from Lisandro López to win its fifth Coupe de France title. The title is the club's first domestically since winning the same competition in 2008. The runners-up, Quevilly, alongside fellow National club Gazélec Ajaccio, were awarded the Petit Poucet Plaque, an award given to the best performing non-professional club in the Coupe de France.

2012 Coupe de France Final

The 2012 Coupe de France Final was the 94th final of France's most prestigious football cup competition. The final took place on 28 April 2012 at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis and was contested between Lyon and Quevilly. The winner of the Coupe de France is guaranteed a place in the group stage of the UEFA Europa League with the club's appearance being dependent on whether it qualifies for the 2012–13 UEFA Champions League. The final was broadcast live on France 2.

First division club Lyon defeated semi-professional third-tier Quevilly 1–0 in the final courtesy of a first half goal from Lisandro López to win its fifth Coupe de France title. The title is the club's first domestically since winning the same competition in 2008. The runners-up, Quevilly, alongside fellow National club Gazélec Ajaccio, were awarded the Petit Poucet Plaque, an award given to the best performing non-professional club in the Coupe de France.

Alexandre Lacazette

Alexandre Lacazette (French pronunciation: ​[alɛksɑ̃dʁ lakazɛt]; born 28 May 1991) is a French professional footballer who plays as a forward for Premier League club Arsenal and the France national team.

Lacazette came into prominence as a member of the academy at Lyon, where he made his professional debut aged 19. He helped the club win the Coupe de France and Trophée des Champions in 2012, and was named the Ligue 1 Player of the Year in 2014–15. During his time in France, Lacazette cultivated a reputation as a prolific goalscorer and poacher, recording multiple twenty-goal seasons, which earned him a move to Arsenal in a then club-record £46.5 million (€53 million) deal in 2017.Ever since debuting for the national side, Lacazette has represented France across all youth levels. He was a key player in France's victory in the 2010 UEFA European Under-19 Championship, where he scored the match-winning goal in the final against Spain. He then made his senior international debut in June 2013, scoring his first goal in March 2015.

Known for dribbling, pace, and ability with both feet, as well as his persistence to press and tackle when out of possession, Lacazette has been compared to former Arsenal forward Ian Wright by Gérard Houllier.

Coupe de France

The Coupe de France, also known as the Coupe Charles Simon, is the premier knockout cup competition in French football organized by the French Football Federation (FFF). It was first held in 1917 and is open to all amateur and professional football clubs in France, including clubs based in the overseas departments and territories. Between 1917 and 1919, the competition was called the Coupe Charles Simon, in tribute of Charles Simon, a French sportsman and the founder of the French Interfederal Committee (the ancestor of the French Football Federation), who died in 1915 while serving in World War I. The final is played at the Stade de France and the winner qualifies for the group stage of the UEFA Europa League and a place in the Trophée des Champions match. A concurrent women's tournament is also held, the Coupe de France Féminine.

Combined with random draws and one-off matches (no replays), the Coupe de France can be difficult for the bigger clubs to win. The competition is usually beneficial to the amateur clubs as it forces higher-ranked clubs, usually professional clubs, to play as the away team when drawn against lower-league opposition if they are competing two levels below them. Despite the advantages, only two amateur clubs have reached the final since professionalism was introduced in French football in 1932: Calais RUFC in 2000 and Les Herbiers VF in 2018. Two clubs from outside Ligue 1 have won the competition, Le Havre in 1959 and Guingamp in 2009. The reigning champions are Rennes, who defeated Paris Saint-Germain in the final of the 2018–19 competition.

8,506 clubs competed in the 2017-18 edition.

Football in France

Association football is the most popular sport in France, followed by rugby union. The French Football Federation (FFF, Fédération Française de Football) is the national governing body and is responsible for overseeing all aspects of association football in the country, both professional and amateur. The federation organizes the Coupe de France and is responsible for appointing the management of the men's, women's and youth national football teams in France. The federation gives responsibility of Ligue 1 and Ligue 2 to the Ligue de Football Professionnel who oversee, organize, and manage the country's top two leagues. The LFP is also responsible for organizing the Coupe de la Ligue, the country's league cup competition. The French Football Federation also supervises the overseas departments and territories leagues and hosts football club AS Monaco, a club based in the independent sovereign state of Monaco. In 2006, the FFF had 2,143,688 licenses, with over 1,850,836 registered players and 18,194 registered clubs.The first football club was introduced to France in 1863, as described in a newspaper article by The Scotsman, which stated "A number of English gentlemen living in Paris have lately organised a football club... The football contests take place in the Bois de Boulogne, by permission of the authorities and surprise the French amazingly." Modern football was introduced nine years later in 1872 by English sailors playing in Le Havre in 1872.

France national football team

The France national football team (French: Équipe de France de football) represents France in international football and is controlled by the French Football Federation, also known as FFF, or in French: Fédération française de football. The team's colours are blue, white and red, and the coq gaulois its symbol. France are colloquially known as Les Bleus (The Blues). The French side are the reigning World Cup holders, having won the 2018 FIFA World Cup on 15 July 2018.

France play home matches at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, Paris, and their manager is Didier Deschamps. They have won two FIFA World Cups, two UEFA European Championships, two FIFA Confederations Cups and one Olympic tournament. France experienced much of its success in four major eras: in the 1950s, 1980s, late 1990s/early 2000s, and mid/late 2010s, respectively, which resulted in numerous major honours. France was one of the four European teams that participated in the inaugural World Cup in 1930 and, although having been eliminated in the qualification stage six times, is one of only three teams that have entered every World Cup qualifying cycle.In 1958, the team, led by Raymond Kopa and Just Fontaine, finished in third place at the FIFA World Cup. In 1984, France, led by Ballon d'Or winner Michel Platini, won UEFA Euro 1984 and Football at the 1984 Summer Olympics.

Under the captaincy of Didier Deschamps and three-time FIFA World Player of the Year Zinedine Zidane, France won the FIFA World Cup in 1998. Two years later, the team triumphed at UEFA Euro 2000. France won the FIFA Confederations Cup in 2001 and 2003, and reached the 2006 FIFA World Cup final, which it lost 5–3 on penalties to Italy. The team also reached the final of UEFA Euro 2016, where they lost 1–0 to Portugal in extra time. France won the 2018 FIFA World Cup, defeating Croatia 4–2 in the final match on 15 July 2018. This was the second time they had won the tournament after winning it on home soil in 1998.

France was the first national team that has won the three most important men's titles recognized by FIFA: the World Cup, the Confederations Cup, and the Olympic tournament after victory in the Confederations Cup in 2001. Since 2001, Argentina (after the 2004 Olympics) and Brazil (after the 2016 Olympics) are the other two national teams that have won these three titles. They have also won their respective continental championship (Copa América for Argentina and Brazil, and UEFA European Championship for France).

France national football team manager

The France national football team manager was first established on 25 April 1964 following the appointment of the country's first national team manager Henri Guérin. Before this, the France national team was selected by a selection committee, a process in which the French Football Federation would select coaches and trainers from within the country or abroad to prepare the side for single games and tournaments, but with all decisions ultimately remaining under the control of the committee. From 1904–1913, the USFSA headed the committee, which was referred to as the Commission Centrale d'Association. The committee was controlled by André Espir and André Billy and featured little to no physical preparation for upcoming matches. In 1913, the Comité Français Interfédéral, a precursor to the French Football Federation, took over the committee following the USFSA becoming affiliated with the organization and secretary general Henri Delaunay took control.

Following the creation of the French Football Federation, the committee was converted into a five-man board and lasted from 1919–1964. Gaston Barreau served as the head of the committee in two different stints; from 1920–1945, then, after four years, returned to select the team from 1949 until his death in 1958. From 1945–1949, Gabriel Hanot headed the committee and, following Barreau's death, Paul Nicolas (1958–1959) and Georges Verriest (1959–1964) controlled the committee until it was officially disbanded in 1964.

Fifteen men have occupied the post since its inception; three of those were in short-term caretaker manager roles: José Arribas and Jean Snella managed the team in dual roles and presided over four matches and former French international Just Fontaine managed the team for two matches in 1967. The longest tenure by a French national team manager is Raymond Domenech, who managed the team from 12 July 2004 to 11 July 2010, a period of six years. Four managers have won major tournaments while managing the national team. The first was Michel Hidalgo, who managed the team from 1976–1984, which is the second-longest tenure behind Domenech. Hidalgo won UEFA Euro 1984. In 1998, Aimé Jacquet won the 1998 FIFA World Cup on home soil and, two years later, Roger Lemerre led the team to glory at UEFA Euro 2000. Lemerre also won the 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup. Finally, current manager Didier Deschamps won the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia, twenty years after he lifted the trophy as captain. On 8 August 1973, the Romanian Ștefan Kovács became the first foreign manager of the team. During the period of the selection committee, the national team was coached by several British managers. Thomas Griffiths (English) coached the team for a portion of 1924, while Peter Farmer (Scottish) coached the team at the 1928 Summer Olympics. From 1934–1936, the team was coached by Sid Kimpton. The current manager of the French national team is former international Didier Deschamps who replaced fellow international Laurent Blanc following the UEFA Euro 2012 on 8 July 2012.

France national under-16 football team

The France national under-16 football team is the national under-16 football team of France and is controlled by the French Football Federation. The team previously competed in the annual UEFA European Under-16 Football Championship before it was converted into an under-17 competition in 2002. The under-16 team competes in regional tournaments, such as the Tournoi de Val-de-Marne and the Montaigu Tournament and international tournaments, such as the Aegean Cup.

Prior to the UEFA European Under-16 Football Championship being converted into an under-17 event, France never won the competition, but finished as runners-up on two occasions in 1996 and 2001.

France national under-18 football team

The France national under-18 football team is the national under-18 football team of France and is controlled by the French Football Federation. The under-18 team matches are not competitive, merely for participate in friendly matches and tournaments, such as the Lafarge Foot Avenir and the Taça do Atlântico. The team serves as a feeder team to the under-19 team.

France have won the UEFA European Under-18 Football Championship twice in 1996 and 1997.

France national youth football team

The France national youth football team are the national under-20, under-19, under-18, under-17 and under-16 football teams of France and are controlled by the French Football Federation. The youth teams of France participate in tournaments sanctioned by both FIFA and UEFA and also participates in world, regional, and local international tournaments.

Laurent Duhamel

Laurent Duhamel (born October 10, 1968 in Rouen) is a French football referee. He has been a referee in the French Football Federation (FFF) since 1993 and a FIFA referee since 1999. He was suspended from refereeing in France in 2009, but allowed to continue to referee international matches.Duhamel has officiated in qualifiers for the 2002, 2006, and 2010 World Cups, as well as Euro 2008 qualifying.

Ligue de Football Professionnel

The Ligue de Football Professionnel (French pronunciation: ​[liɡ də futbol pʁɔfɛsjɔnɛl], Professional Football League), commonly known as the LFP, is a French governing body that runs the major professional football leagues in France. It was founded in 1944 and serves under the authority of the French Football Federation. The current president of the league is Nathalie Boy de la Tour. It is heartquartered in Paris.The league is responsible for overseeing, organizing, and managing the top two leagues in France, Ligue 1 and Ligue 2, and is also responsible for the 44 professional football clubs that contest football in France (20 in Ligue 1, 20 in Ligue 2, and four in the Championnat National). The league also organizes a yearly cup competition, the Coupe de la Ligue, that, unlike the Coupe de France, is limited to professional clubs.

List of France international footballers

The France national football team (French: Equipe de France) represents the nation of France in international association football. It is fielded by the French Football Federation (French: Fédération Française de Football), the governing body of football in France, and competes as a member of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), which encompasses the countries of Europe. The team played its first official international match on 1 May 1904 against Belgium. Since its first competitive match, more than 800 players have made at least one international appearance for the team. As hundreds of players have played for the team since it started officially registering its players in 1904, only players with 20 or more official caps are included.

Jean Ducret became the first French international to reach 20 caps, doing so on 29 March 1914 in a 2–0 defeat to Italy. He was also one of the first permanent captains of the national team. Ducret was later surpassed by defender Raymond Dubly and goalkeeper Pierre Chayriguès, who both played with the national team until 1925. Dubly finished his international career with 31 caps. Three years after retiring from the national team, Dubly's amount was exceeded by Jules Dewaquez, who went on to finish his career with 41 appearances. Dewaquez's record stood for nearly a decade before his amount was equaled by Edmond Delfour in 1938 and later surmounted by Étienne Mattler a year later. Similar to Dubly, Mattler's amount was exceeded, however after two decades, by former Stade de Reims defenders Roger Marche and Robert Jonquet. It was the former player who took over the record outperforming Jonquet by just five caps. Marche's 63 appearances remained the France national team record for appearance-making for 24 years, the longest time between the record being broken and set again. Marche was surpassed by Marius Trésor, who set the record after appearing in an October 1983 friendly match against Spain.Trésor represented France only once afterward and his 65-cap output was subsequently passed by defender Maxime Bossis and midfielder Michel Platini. Bossis surpassed Trésor during qualifying for the 1986 FIFA World Cup, while Platini went beyond the former Marseille and Bordeaux player at the tournament itself, in which France finished in third place. Both players retired within months of each other as Bossis finished his career occupying the record, which was now at 76 caps, four more than Platini. After appearing at the 1986 FIFA World Cup, Bossis acquired the record of appearing in the most FIFA World Cup matches for France. He was surpassed by goalkeeper Fabien Barthez in 2006. Bossis was passed just six years later by former international teammate Manuel Amoros, who finished his international career with 82 appearances. The 1992–93 UEFA Champions League winner was eventually equaled or outperformed by 13 different players. Of the 13 players, 10 of them played on the team that won the 1998 FIFA World Cup and seven of them went on to become members of the FIFA Century Club, which consists of association football players who have accumulated 100 or more caps. Following the conclusion of UEFA Euro 2000, the record for France national team appearances was held by Didier Deschamps who also became the first French international to reach 100 caps. He was eventually surpassed by defender Marcel Desailly in 2003 who retired at the end of UEFA Euro 2004 with 116 caps. As a result, Desailly became the first player not born in France or the overseas departments and territories to occupy the record. The current record holder for appearances with the national team is Lilian Thuram, who made 142 total competitive appearances for the team between 1994 and 2008. Thuram broke Desailly's record at the 2006 FIFA World Cup in the team's final group stage match against Togo. He is the second player born in an overseas department to hold the record, the first being Trésor. Both players were born in Guadeloupe.

List of France national football team captains

The France national football team (French: Equipe de France) represents the nation of France in international association football. It is fielded by the French Football Federation (FFF) (French: Fédération Française de Football) and competes as a member of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). The team played its first official international match on 1 May 1904 against Belgium. Since its first competitive match, more than 800 players have made at least one international appearance for the team. Of them, 105 have served as captain of the national team. This list contains football players who have served as captain of the French national team and is listed according to their number of matches captained.

The France national team's record appearance-maker as captain is Didier Deschamps, who led the team out 52 times during his 103-cap tenure, which lasted through three decades. Deschamps is also the most successful France captain, having worn the armband, an indicator of the team's captain, in team victories at the 1998 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 2000. The Bayonne-born midfielder surpassed the previous record-holder of the France captaincy, midfielder Michel Platini, in the team's semi-final match at the latter competition. Platini became the first France captain to win a major international competition after leading the team in the 1984 European Football Championship. Aside from Deschamps and Platini, only two other players have captained France over 40 occasions, defenders Roger Marche and Marcel Desailly. Marche is one of two French captains to lead the team at two FIFA World Cup competitions. Desailly captained the team to victories at the 2001 and 2003 editions of the FIFA Confederations Cup. He is one of four players to be sent off in a FIFA World Cup final; one of the other three being fellow France captain Zinedine Zidane.

List of France women's international footballers

This article is about France women's national football team players with at least 20 appearances. For a list of all French women's players with a Wikipedia article, see the Category:French women's footballers. For the current national team squad, see current squad.

The France women's national football team (French: Equipe de France Féminine) represents the nation of France in international women's association football. It is fielded by the French Football Federation (FFF) (French: Fédération Française de Football), the governing body of football in France, and competes as a member of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), which encompasses the countries of Europe. The team played its first official international match under FFF jurisdiction on 17 April 1971 against the Netherlands. Since its first competitive match under the federation, more than 260 players have made at least one international appearance for the team.

List of French women's football champions

The French women's football champions are the winners of the highest league of football in France for women, the Division 1 Féminine. Since the creation of the women's first division by the French Football Federation in 1975, the women's football championship of France has been contested through the Division 1 Féminine. Prior to this, the first division championship of French women's football was contested through a league ran by the Fédération des Sociétés Féminines Sportives de France (FSFSF), a women's football organization in France that was led by women's football pioneer Alice Milliat. The FSFSF's league ran from 1918–1932 and awarded 14 league titles before being disbanded due to the prohibition of women's football.

Yohan Cabaye

Yohan Cabaye (French pronunciation: ​[jɔ.an ka.baj]; born 14 January 1986) is a French professional footballer who most recently played as a central midfielder for UAE club Al-Nasr and formerly for the France national team. He is described as a player who possesses "excellent vision, great ball control", and "provides technical quality". Cabaye is also known for his free-kick and penalty-taking ability.Cabaye began his football career playing for hometown club Tourcoing FC at the age of six. After seven years developing in the club's youth academy, he joined professional club Lille. Cabaye spent six years in the club's youth academy before making his professional debut in the 2004–05 season helping Lille win the 2004 UEFA Intertoto Cup. He became a regular starter in the following season and participated in the UEFA Champions League for the first time under Claude Puel. Under manager Rudi Garcia, Cabaye developed into a playmaker and had his best season to date in the 2009–10 season scoring over 15 goals from the midfield position. In the 2010–11 season, he was a part of the Lille team that won the league and cup double. Following the season, in June 2011, Cabaye joined English club Newcastle United on a five-year deal. On 29 January 2014, Newcastle accepted a £19 million offer for Cabaye from Ligue 1 champions Paris Saint-Germain. Cabaye joined, signing a three-year contract with the club. On 10 July 2015, he joined Crystal Palace.

Cabaye is a former French youth international having represented his nation at under-16, under-18, under-19, under-20, and under-21 level. At under-19 level, he played on the team that won the 2005 European Under-19 Football Championship. With the under-20 team, Cabaye played at the 2006 edition of the Toulon Tournament. At under-21 level, he served as captain of the team for a portion of his stint. In August 2010, Cabaye was called up to the senior team for the first time under new manager Laurent Blanc, and made his international debut on 11 August in a 2–1 friendly defeat against Norway. He has since earned over 40 caps and represented France at two UEFA European Football Championships (2012, 2016) and the 2014 FIFA World Cup.

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