Freeman McNeil

Freeman McNeil (born April 22, 1959) is a former professional American football player who was selected by the New York Jets in the first round as the third overall pick of the 1981 NFL Draft.

After leading Banning High School to the Los Angeles City football title, the 5'11", 214 lbs. running back attended the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where he was a two-time all-Pacific-10 Conference selection. In his final game, he caught a deflected pass from quarterback Jay Schroeder that was tipped by USC defensive back Jeff Fisher and went 57 yards for the winning touchdown with two minutes left in the Bruins' 20–17 win.

McNeil played in 12 NFL seasons for the Jets from 1981 to 1992. During the mid to late 1980s he was a member of the Jets' "Two Headed Monster" backfield along with teammate Johnny Hector, a tandem that ranked among the league's elite. When he retired he was the Jets all-time leading rusher with 8,074 yards; he was surpassed by Curtis Martin and currently ranks second in Jets team history. In 1982, McNeil led the NFL in rushing with 786 yards. He was the first Jet to the lead the league in rushing. He is one of a few running backs in NFL history to average 4.0 yards per carry in every season he played.

From 1990 to 1992 McNeil was the lead plaintiff in a case won by jury verdict that struck down the NFL's Plan B free agency system, under which teams could protect 37 players. McNeil and the seven other plaintiffs were among the protected players listed by their teams. The system was deemed too restrictive and a violation of antitrust laws. However, Freeman was not one of the four plaintiffs awarded damages.[1] The suit is considered a major step in the achievement of free agency rights by the NFL Players Association.[2]

In 2005, he was inducted into the Nassau County Sports Hall of Fame.[3]

Freeman McNeil
No. 24
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:April 22, 1959 (age 60)
Jackson, Mississippi
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:216 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:Los Angeles (CA) Banning
College:UCLA
NFL Draft:1981 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing Yards:8,074
Average:4.5
Touchdowns:38
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ Jarrett Bell (April 3, 2011). "Freeman McNeil sees history repeating in NFL labor dispute". USA Today. Retrieved October 14, 2011.
  2. ^ Associated Press (March 3, 2011). "NFL labor history since 1968". ESPN. Archived from the original on January 11, 2012. Retrieved October 14, 2011.
  3. ^ "John Genzale: Inside Out". sportsbusinessdaily.com. 4 April 2005. Retrieved 17 September 2016. Freeman McNeil and Gene Mayer get inducted into the county’s hall of fame.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Clark Gaines/Scott Dierking
New York Jets Starting Running Back
1981–1989
Succeeded by
Blair Thomas/Brad Baxter
1979 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1979 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1979 UCLA Bruins football team

The 1979 UCLA Bruins football team represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. This was Terry Donahue's fourth season as the Bruins' head coach.–

1980 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1980 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1980 UCLA Bruins football team

The 1980 UCLA Bruins football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fifth year under head coach Terry Donahue, the Bruins compiled a 9–2 record (5–2 Pac-10), finished in second place in the Pacific-10 Conference, and were ranked #13 in the final AP Poll.UCLA's offensive leaders in 1980 were quarterback Tom Ramsey with 1,116 passing yards, running back Freeman McNeil with 1,105 rushing yards, and wide receiver Cormac Carney with 591 receiving yards.

1982 All-Pro Team

The 1982 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League (NFL) players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly in 1982. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Sporting News did not choose a 1982 All-Pro team due to the players' strike.

1982 New York Jets season

The 1982 New York Jets season was the 23rd season for the franchise and its 13th in the National Football League. It began with the team trying to improve upon its 10–5–1 record from 1981 and return to the playoffs under head coach Walt Michaels. The season was marred by an eight-week players’ strike, cancelling eight scheduled games (one game was made up at the end of the season), and eliminating divisional play for the season; the top eight teams from each conference advanced to the playoffs. The Jets finished the season with a record of 6–3 in sixth place in the American Football Conference. They defeated the Cincinnati Bengals and Los Angeles Raiders in the first two rounds of the playoffs to advance to their first AFC Championship Game. There, they fell to their division rivals, the Miami Dolphins, 14–0.

1984 New York Jets season

The 1984 New York Jets season was the 25th season for the team and the fifteenth in the National Football League. It began with the team trying to improve upon its 7–9 record from 1983 under head coach Joe Walton. After playing the previous 20 seasons at Shea Stadium in Queens, 1984 marked their first season of playing its home games at Giants Stadium in The Meadowlands, which was also the home of the NFC’s New York Giants. Mark Gastineau made NFL history by recording 22 sacks, to establish a then-new official single season record. The Jets finished the season with a record of 7–9.

1985 All-Pro Team

The 1985 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News in 1985. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

Pro Football Weekly, which suspended operations in 1985, did not choose an All-Pro team.

1985 New York Jets season

The 1985 New York Jets season was the 26th season for the team and the 16th in the National Football League. It began with the team trying to improve upon its 7–9 record from 1984 under head coach Joe Walton. Among quarterbacks, Ken O'Brien had the lowest rate of interceptions, with only eight interceptions in 488 passing attempts. The Jets finished the season with a record of 11–5, qualifying for the top Wild Card spot in the playoffs. On October 14, during a Monday Night Halftime ceremony, the Jets retired Joe Namath’s number 12, and helped inspire the Jets to a 23–7 victory over the Dolphins. In the playoffs, they fell at home to the division rival, and eventual AFC champion New England Patriots in the Wild Card round.

1986 New York Jets season

The 1986 New York Jets season was the 27th season for the team and the seventeenth in the National Football League. It began with the team trying to improve upon its 11–5 record from 1985 and return to the playoffs under head coach Joe Walton. The Jets finished the season with a record of 10–6, qualifying for the top Wild Card spot in the playoffs despite losing their last five games of the season. They defeated the Kansas City Chiefs in the Wild Card round, but lost to the Cleveland Browns in the divisional round. The loss to the Browns is infamous in Jets history. Leading 20–10 in the 4th quarter, the Jets collapsed when Mark Gastineau hammered Browns quarterback Bernie Kosar seconds after he released a pass; Gastineau was flagged for roughing the passer and the Browns rallied to force overtime and win early in the game's second overtime.

The Week 3 game against Miami was memorable as Ken O'Brien and Dolphins quarterback Dan Marino fought a wild shootout that culminated in the Jets winning 51–45 in overtime. Marino threw for 448 yards and six TD passes while O'Brien accumulated 479 yards, four touchdowns, and one interception for what would statistically be the best game of his career.

1988 New York Jets season

The 1988 New York Jets season was the 29th season for the team and the 19th in the National Football League. It began with the team trying to improve upon its 6–9 record from 1987 under head coach Joe Walton. The Jets finished the season with a record of 8–7–1. Although for the second straight year they failed to qualify for the playoffs, they would play the spoiler, as a victory over their cross-town rival New York Giants in Week 16 kept the Giants out of the playoffs due to a series of tiebreakers. For the third time in his career, Ken O'Brien had the lowest rate of interceptions among quarterbacks. He had 7 interceptions in 424 passing attempts.

The Jets endured a major distraction when Mark Gastineau, the team's main pass rusher who appeared to be experiencing a career-renaissance, abruptly retired in midseason to tend to ailing actress Brigitte Nielsen.

1990 New York Jets season

The 1990 New York Jets season was the 31st season for the team and the 21st in the National Football League. It began with the team, under new head coach Bruce Coslet, trying to improve from winning only four games in 1989 under Joe Walton. The Jets finished the season at 6–10.

1992 New York Jets season

The 1992 New York Jets season was the 33rd season for the team and the 23rd in the National Football League. The Jets were looking to improve on their 8–8 record under head coach Bruce Coslet in 1991 and also make a second consecutive trip to the postseason. However, it was not to be.

The Jets' problems began in the offseason when veteran quarterback Ken O'Brien announced he was holding out of training camp to get a new contract. O'Brien’s holdout continued into the season and Coslet named second-year backup Browning Nagle as the team's starter. Nagle did not have an effective year, only winning three of his thirteen starts. He was eventually replaced by O'Brien late in the year, but was pressed back into action after the veteran suffered a season-ending injury. The Jets didn't win a game until Week 5 against the New England Patriots and only won three more times the rest of the year to finish with a 4–12 record. Two of those wins came against division rivals, the eventual AFC Champion Buffalo Bills and the AFC East winner and conference runner up Miami Dolphins.

In addition to O'Brien’s injury, the Jets saw career-ending injuries claim two of their star players and a season-ending injury befall another. In Week 2 defensive end Jeff Lageman, who had been a defensive star for the Jets during their 1991 playoff push, went down with a season-ending injury. Then, in a Week 10 loss to the Denver Broncos, star receiver Al Toon suffered his ninth career concussion and was forced to retire immediately after eight seasons in the NFL. Finally, in Week 13 against Kansas City, defensive end Dennis Byrd broke his C-5 vertebra in his neck; while going to try to sack Chiefs’ quarterback Dave Krieg Byrd ran headfirst into teammate Scott Mersereau to cause the injury. The Jets wore a decal on their helmets for the rest of the season with Byrd's #90 surrounding an ichthys and have not issued #90 since; Byrd has since regained the ability to walk. With Byrd's injury still fresh in their minds the Jets went to Buffalo for their Week 14 matchup with the Bills and defeated them for their fourth and last win of the season. Denis Byrd was used as inspiration in the 2010/2011 playoffs by then Head Coach Rex Ryan. Byrd not only addressed the team prior to the upset win the AFC Divisional Playoff game at the New England Patriots, but his jersey that was cut off of him on the day he was injured was carried out to mid-field for the coin toss. Sadly Dennis Byrd was killed by a drunk driver in the winter of 2016.

After the season, Jets star running back Freeman McNeil announced his retirement. At the time of his retirement he was the all-time leading rusher in Jets history, but he has since been surpassed by Curtis Martin.

Blair Thomas

Blair Lamar Thomas (born October 7, 1967) is a former professional American football running back in the National Football League for the New York Jets, New England Patriots, Dallas Cowboys, Atlanta Falcons and Carolina Panthers. He played college football at Penn State University.

Brad Baxter

Herman Bradley Baxter (born May 5, 1967) is a former professional American football player in the National Football League. He spent his entire career with the New York Jets (1989–1995). A 6'1", 233 lbs. running back from Alabama State, Baxter's best year as a pro came during the 1991 season when he rushed for 11 touchdowns.

Baxter played alongside former 13-year Arena Football League veteran, Tony Bowick in high school at Slocomb High School in Slocomb, Alabama.

Johnny Hector

Johnny Lyndell Hector (born November 26, 1960 in Lafayette, Louisiana), is a former professional American football player who was selected by the New York Jets in the second round of the 1983 NFL Draft. A 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m), 200 lb running back from Texas A&M, Hector played 10 NFL seasons for the New York Jets from 1983 to 1992. Hector's best season as a pro came during the 1987 season when he was tied with Charles White for most rushing touchdowns in the league with 11. During the mid to late 1980s, he served as a member of the 'Two-Headed Monster' backfield along with Freeman McNeil, creating a one-two punch at running back among the most potent in the league.

Hector compiled 4,280 rushing yards on 1,051 carries and 41 touchdowns; he also caught 188 passes for 1,661 yards and three touchdowns. His last NFL touchdown was against the New England Patriots on December 23, 1990.

He played high school football at New Iberia Senior High School and graduated in 1979.

Mr. Football USA

Mr. Football USA also known as ESPN RISE National Player of the Year, formerly EA Sports Mr. Football USA, is an award presented to the United States high school football National Player of the year by ESPN HS. In 2013, the award was given by the StudentSports.com.2013 - Will Grier, Davidson (North Carolina) QB

2012 - Max Browne, Skyline (Washington) QB

2011 – Johnathan Gray, Aledo (Texas) RB

2010 – Johnathan Gray, Aledo (Texas) RB (Jr.)

2009 – Dillon Baxter, Mission Bay (San Diego) QB-RB

2008 – Garrett Gilbert, Lake Travis (Austin, Texas) QB

2007 – Jacory Harris, Northwestern (Miami) QB

2006 – Darren Evans, Warren Central (Indianapolis) FB

2005 – Matthew Stafford, Highland Park (Dallas) QB

2004 – Chase Daniel, Carroll (Southlake, Texas) QB

2003 – Jeff Byers, Loveland (Loveland, Colo.) OL-DL

2002 – Chris Leak, Independence (Charlotte, N.C.) QB

2001 – Vince Young, Madison (Houston) QB

2000 – Cedric Benson, Robert E. Lee (Midland, Texas) RB

1999 – D. J. Williams, De La Salle (Concord, Calif.) RB-LB

1998 – J. R. House, Nitro (Nitro, W. Va.) QB

1997 – Ronald Curry, Hampton (Va.) QB-RB

1996 – Travis Henry, Frostproof (Fla.) RB

1995 – Tim Couch, Leslie County (Hyden, Ky.) QB

1994 – Chris Redman, Male (Louisville, Ky.) QB

1993 – Peyton Manning, Newman (New Orleans) QB

1992 – James Allen, Wynnewood (Okla.) RB

1991 – Steven Davis, Spartanburg (S.C.) RB

1990 – Derrick Brooks, Washington (Pensacola, Fla.) LB

1989 – Robert Smith, Euclid (Ohio) RB

1988 – Terry Kirby, Tabb (Va.) RB

1987 – Carl Pickens, Murphy (N.C.) WR

1986 – Emmitt Smith, Escambia (Pensacola, Fla.) RB

1985 – Jeff George, Warren Central (Indianapolis) QB

1984 – Andre Rison, Northwestern (Flint, Mich.) WR-DB

1983 – Chris Spielman, Washington (Massillon, Ohio) LB

1982 – Rod Woodson, Snider (Fort Wayne, Ind.) WR-DB

1981 – Marcus Dupree, Philadelphia (Miss.) RB

1980 – Bill Fralic, Penn Hills (Pittsburgh) OL

1979 – Herschel Walker, Johnson County (Wrightsville, Ga.) RB

1978 – Eric Dickerson, Sealy (Sealy) RB

1977 – Marcus Allen, Lincoln (San Diego) QB-RB

1976 – Freeman McNeil, Banning (Wilmington, Calif.) RB

1975 – Charles White, San Fernando (San Fernando, Calif.) RB

1974 – Billy Sims, Hooks (Hooks, Texas) RB

1973 – Earl Campbell, John Tyler (Tyler, Texas) RB

1972 – Tony Dorsett, Hopewell (Aliquippa, Pa.) RB

1971 – Dave Logan, Wheat Ridge (Wheat Ridge, Colo.) WR

1970 – Pat Haden, Bishop Amat (La Puente, Calif.) QB

Stanley Wilson (running back)

Stanley Tobias Wilson Sr. (born August 23, 1961) is an American former professional football running back who played for the NFL's Cincinnati Bengals. He attended college at the University of Oklahoma and selected by the Bengals in the ninth round of the 1983 NFL Draft.

Wilson played high school football at Banning High School in Los Angeles, where he played with Freeman McNeil in the backfield and he was the 4A player of the year in 1978 and 1979.

UCLA Bruins football statistical leaders

The UCLA Bruins football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the UCLA Bruins football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Bruins represent the University of California, Los Angeles in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference.

Although UCLA began competing in intercollegiate football in 1919, these lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1919, seasons have increased from 8 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Bruins have played in 11 bowl games since this decision, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2017

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