Fred Smerlas

Frederic Charles Smerlas (born April 8, 1957) is a former American football defensive lineman who was a 5-time NFL Pro Bowl selection during 14-year career as a nose tackle with the Buffalo Bills, San Francisco 49ers, and New England Patriots.

Smerlas, of Greek-American descent, graduated from Waltham High School in 1975, where he was a star football player and wrestler. He became a defensive lineman for Boston College before embarking on an NFL career. His 1990 autobiography, By a Nose, recounts his eleven years with the Buffalo Bills and their climb from cellar-dwellers to Super Bowl contenders.

Smerlas currently resides in Sudbury, Massachusetts and is a part-time co-host during football season on Sportsradio WEEI-FM as well as a contributor to western New York radio stations WGR in Buffalo and WHAM in Rochester. Smerlas is an avid motorcyclist, who often rides to support various Boston based charitable organizations.

Fred Smerlas
No. 76
Position:Nose tackle
Personal information
Born:April 8, 1957 (age 62)
Waltham, Massachusetts
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:277 lb (126 kg)
Career information
College:Boston College
NFL Draft:1979 / Round: 2 / Pick: 32
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Sacks:18.5
Interceptions:2
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

All Pro Productions

Smerlas's company, All-Pro Productions, Inc.[1] is a telemarketing contractor and fundraiser for police, firefighter, and similar organizations and agencies in Massachusetts. All-Pro Productions, Inc was one of the for-profit solicitor organizations profiled in a Worcester Telegram article.[2] The article was critical of several organizations which raise money in donations and return only a small percentage to the charity. According to state records obtained by the telegram, All-Pro productions raised $559,042 since 2007 from donors for a Worcester firefighters memorial to honor the six who died in the 1999 Worcester cold storage fire. 68 percent ($379,041) of the money raised went to All-Pro productions and $180,001 was donated to the memorial.[3] In 2010 All-Pro Productions raised $416,626 from donors for the Veterans outreach center Metrowest which received 18 percent of the funds raised ($74,494).[4]

Fred & Steve's Steakhouse

Smerlas, along with friend and colleague Steve DeOssie, opened a second place award-winning steakhouse at the Twin River Casino in Lincoln, Rhode Island in March 2007 called Fred & Steve's Steakhouse.[5]

Political career

A Boston Herald article [6] announced on April 6, 2007 that Fred considered seeking the Massachusetts 5th US Congressional seat being vacated by Martin T. Meehan as a Republican candidate. He dropped out of the race on April 26 after supporting candidate James Ogonowski, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and brother of John Ogonowski, who piloted American Airlines Flight 11.

"No one tells me what to do, I have faith in Jim. I believe in this guy," Smerlas reported in an April 27 Boston Globe article.[7]

In 2010, Smerlas expressed an interest in relocating to Western New York to challenge Brian Higgins or Louise Slaughter, believing that they have not adequately represented Western New York or the upstate region as a whole. He indicated that his son was considering attending the University at Buffalo, and if he were to relocate, he may run either in 2010 or 2012,[8] later ruling out a 2010 run. He said that his first priority "would be to take a big saw and cut New York City off."[9]

Bibliography

  • Fred Smerlas and Vic Carucci, By A Nose: The Off-Center Life of Football's Funniest Lineman, Simon And Schuster, 1990. ISBN 0-671-70532-6

See also

External links

References

  1. ^ "Predatory Telemarketers Prey on Public Sympathy for Veterans| Nonprofit Quarterly". Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly. November 11, 2014. Retrieved May 29, 2017.
  2. ^ 12-28-2014 Worcester Telegram
  3. ^ STAFF, Thomas Caywood, TELEGRAM & GAZETTE. "Telemarketers for charities keep most of the Mass. take". telegram.com. Retrieved May 29, 2017.
  4. ^ Milford Daily news August 1, 2012.
  5. ^ Doyle, Bill (January 18, 2007). "DeOssie likes Pats Sunday". Worcester Telegram & Gazette. Retrieved May 2, 2007.
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ "Ogonowski's House bid gets boost – The Boston Globe". Boston.com. Associated Press. April 27, 2007. Retrieved August 23, 2010.
  8. ^ "Smerlas For Congress? He Says Maybe... - WBEN NewsRadio 930 : Buffalo & Niagara Falls, NY". Wben.com. Archived from the original on June 14, 2011. Retrieved August 23, 2010.
  9. ^ Rich Newberg Posted by: Eli George (March 29, 2010). "Will former Bill make a run for office". WIVB.com. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved August 23, 2010.
1979 Buffalo Bills season

The 1979 Buffalo Bills season was the 20th season for the club, and its tenth in the National Football League.

Head coach Chuck Knox spent his second season with the Bills in 1979, improving on 1978's record by two games. The Bills were 7–6 with three games left to play, but they lost their final three games to finish with a losing record. (Even if Buffalo had won their final three games, they still would have lost the head-to-head tiebreaker to the Miami Dolphins (who finished 10–6) for the division title.)

Buffalo's loss to Miami in Week Seven was their 20th straight loss to the Dolphins, an NFL record.

The 1979 Bills were dead-last in rushing yards in the NFL, with only total 1,621 yards on the ground. Buffalo's 268 points scored was 23rd of the league's 28 teams.

1980 All-Pro Team

The 1980 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1980. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. Pro Football Weekly chose a nose tackle due to the proliferation of 3-4 defenses in the NFL. They, and The Sporting News chose two inside linebackers.

1980 Buffalo Bills season

The 1980 Buffalo Bills season was the 21st season for the club, and 11th season in the National Football League. Their 11–5 record was tied for best in the AFC.

The Bills' defense allowed only 260 points in 1980, 3rd best in the league. Their 4,101 total yards surrendered were best in the NFL in 1980. Buffalo's defense was well represented on the UPI All-AFC team: nose tackle Fred Smerlas and linebacker Jim Haslett – two thirds of Buffalo's "Bermuda Triangle" with linebacker Shane Nelson – were named to the 1st team All-AFC. Defensive end Ben Williams was named to the second team.

Although Buffalo's offensive statistics were not as impressive as its defense, four offensive players were named All-AFC: left guard Reggie McKenzie, left tackle Ken Jones, wide receiver Jerry Butler and rookie running back Joe Cribbs.Cribbs rushed for 1,185 yards, and made his first Pro Bowl. Jerry Butler and Fred Smerlas also were selected to play in the annual all-star game.

1981 All-Pro Team

The 1981 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1981. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Associated Press added a "nose tackle" position in 1981, joining Pro Football Weekly .

1981 Buffalo Bills season

The 1981 Buffalo Bills season was the 22nd season for the club and its 12th in the National Football League.

The season's most memorable moment was probably a Hail Mary catch against the New England Patriots in Week Twelve. The 36-yard touchdown pass from Bills quarterback Joe Ferguson to running back Roland Hooks as time expired won the game for Buffalo, 20–17. The win proved to be crucial in giving Buffalo the final playoff spot in the AFC in 1981. The Bills qualified for the playoffs, but lost, 28-21, to the Cincinnati Bengals.

1982 All-Pro Team

The 1982 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League (NFL) players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly in 1982. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Sporting News did not choose a 1982 All-Pro team due to the players' strike.

1982 Buffalo Bills season

The 1982 Buffalo Bills season was the franchise's 13th season in the National Football League, and the 23rd overall. Due to the 1982 NFL strike, the season was shortened to only nine games; the Bills' 4–5 record left them in the 9th spot in the AFC, therefore eliminating the Bills from the playoffs in the 16-team tournament format.

The Bills led the league in rushing in 1982, with 1,371 yards (152.3 per game) on the ground.

1983 All-Pro Team

The 1983 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News in 1983. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The NEA chose two inside linebackers for the first time, as a reflection of the 3-4 which was the common alignment for NFL defenses in the mid-1980s.

1983 Buffalo Bills season

The 1983 Buffalo Bills season was the 24th season for the club and its 14th in the National Football League (NFL). It was the first of three seasons for head coach Kay Stephenson. Bills running back Joe Cribbs was both the Bills' leading rusher (1131 yards), and the team's leader in receptions and receiving yards (57 catches for 524 yards). The team looked to improve on its 4-5 record from 1982. With the NFL schedule back to 16 games, the Bills were a more competitive team during 1983. The team started 5-2 through its first 7 games. However, they would struggle the rest of the way, as they went 3-6 in its final 9 games en route to a mediocre 8-8 season. This season also saw the Bills beat the Dolphins in Miami for the first time since 1966, Miami's inaugural season.

1984 Pro Bowl

The 1984 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 34th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1983 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1984, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,445. The final score was NFC 45, AFC 3.

Chuck Knox of the Seattle Seahawks led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by San Francisco 49ers head coach Bill Walsh. The referee was Jerry Seeman.Joe Theismann of the Washington Redskins was named the game's Most Valuable Player. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1989 Pro Bowl

The 1989 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 39th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1988 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1989, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,113. The final score was NFC 34, AFC 3.Marv Levy of the Buffalo Bills led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Chicago Bears head coach Mike Ditka. The referee was Ben Dreith.Randall Cunningham of the Philadelphia Eagles was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.It was the last Pro Bowl game played in January for two decades, until the 2010 Pro Bowl.

Glenn Ordway

Glenn Ordway (born January 16, 1951) is an American sports radio and television personality based in the Boston, Massachusetts area. He is a former commentator for the Boston Celtics radio broadcasts. He hosted WEEI-FM's The Big Show until February 15, 2013. On March 17, 2014 he launched "The Big Show Unfiltered"; on SportstalkBoston.com. Ordway had broadcast on ESPN New Hampshire Radio Nashua/Manchester from June 2014 until May 2015 when he left The Big Show. Ordway then left ESPN NH unannounced to return to WEEI 10a-2p week days. Ordway is originally from Lynn, Massachusetts; he graduated from Lynn Classical High School. Ordway is back on WEEI as of September 8, 2015, as part of a midday show with Lou Merloni and Christian Fauria.

List of most consecutive starts and games played by National Football League players

This is a list of the most consecutive starts and games played by a player by position in the NFL.Brett Favre's starts streak of 297 games is the longest all-time. Among defensive players, Jim Marshall's starts streak of 270 is the longest all-time. Of special note is punter Jeff Feagles, who played in 352 consecutive games which is the longest of all-time for a special teams player. Special teams players are not credited with starts in the NFL. In 2018, Ryan Kerrigan became the most recent player to surpass someone at his position for consecutive starts, having broken the previous mark for left outside linebackers previously held by Jason Gildon.Updated through 2018 season

Bold denotes an active streak

Pete Sheppard

Pete Sheppard (born March 26, 1967, in Providence, Rhode Island) is an Italian-American radio host, formerly heard on WEEI-FM 93.7 FM in Boston. Sheppard, a native of Narragansett, Rhode Island, is a graduate of Bishop Hendricken High School in Rhode Island and the Connecticut School of Broadcasting (Class of 1987).

Shane Nelson (American football)

Shane Nelson (born May 25, 1955) is a former professional American football player who played linebacker for six seasons for the Buffalo Bills. Nelson was discovered at an open trial held by the Dallas Cowboys. He was the only player, out of 1,800, to be offered an NFL contract. However, Nelson rejected Dallas' offer and signed for the Bills where he felt he had more of a chance of playing. [1]. During his time in Buffalo he was a part of the "Bermuda Triangle" which also consisted of Fred Smerlas and Jim Haslett. He is also a member of the NJCAA Hall of Fame.

Steve DeOssie

Steven Leonard DeOssie (born November 22, 1962) is a former American football linebacker and long snapper in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants, New York Jets and New England Patriots. He played college football at Boston College.

The Big Show (sports radio show)

The Big Show is a former sports talk radio program hosted by Glenn Ordway on Boston's WEEI-FM 93.7 FM. Started in August 1995, the show was hosted by Ordway and former Boston Globe columnist Michael Holley. The show ended on March 19, 2013.

WHAM (AM)

WHAM (1180 kHz) is an AM clear channel station in Rochester, New York. It is owned by iHeartMedia and airs a News/Talk format. Its studios are located at Five Star Bank Plaza in downtown Rochester. WHAM is an affiliate of the Fox News Radio Network.

Its 50,000-watt non-directional transmitter, located in Chili, New York, operates the maximum power for commercial AM stations in the United States and Canada. During the day, it provides at least secondary coverage to all of Western New York, including Buffalo. It can also be heard in much of southern Ontario, Canada, including Toronto, Peterborough, and Kingston. At night, it can be heard across much of the eastern half of North America with a good radio.

Waltham High School

Waltham High School is the only public high school serving the city of Waltham, Massachusetts.

Franchise
Stadiums
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Division championships (10)
Conference championships (4)
League championships (2)
Wall of Fame
Media
Owners
Current league affiliations
Former league affiliation
Seasons (58)

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.