Fred Odwell

Frederick William Odwell (September 25, 1872 – August 19, 1948) was a professional baseball player. He was an outfielder over parts of four seasons with the Cincinnati Reds. In 1905, he led the National League in home runs. He was born in and later died at the age of 75 in Downsville, New York.

Fred Odwell
Fred Odwell
Outfielder
Born: September 25, 1872
Downsville, New York
Died: August 19, 1948 (aged 75)
Downsville, New York
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 16, 1904, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
September 12, 1907, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average.258
Home runs10
Runs batted in168
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

1904 was Odwell's first season in the Major Leagues. He made his Major League debut on April 16, and finished the season with Cincinnati with a batting average of .284, with 133 hits, including 22 doubles, 10 triples and a home run, plus 26 walks.[1]

In 1905, Odwell finished with a .241 average, with ten doubles, nine triples and nine home runs, along with 26 walks. The nine home runs hit led the National League that season, edging teammate Cy Seymour who had eight.[2] Seymour led the National League that season in batting average (.377) and runs batted in (121) and was tied with Odwell for the lead in home runs at eight with two games left in the season, and would have taken the batting Triple Crown if the two stayed tied. In the next-to-last game of the season, Odwell hit an inside-the-park home run and took the home run title with nine.[3] The nine home runs he hit in 1905 were the last home runs of his Major League career.[4]

Odwell only played in 58 games for Cincinnati in the 1906 season, finishing with a batting average of .245 with two doubles, four triples and no home runs, together with 15 walks. In the 1907 season, his last in the majors, he hit for a .294 average, with five doubles, seven triples and no home runs, with 22 walks. His last Major League game was on September 12, 1907.[1]

Though Odwell was almost exclusively an outfielder during his career, he played one game at second base in 1904 and another in 1907.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Fred Odwell, Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed November 20, 2008.
  2. ^ 1905 National League Expanded Leaderboards, Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed November 20, 2008.
  3. ^ Rhodes, Greg. "Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame Highlights", via Google Books, Clerisy Press, 2007, p. 62. ISBN 1-57860-300-5. Accessed November 20, 2008.
  4. ^ Fred Odwell, Baseball Library. Accessed November 22, 2008. "Odwell leads the NL with 9 round trippers‚ but will never hit another homer."

External links

1872 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1872 throughout the world.

1904 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1904 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 88–65, 18 games behind the New York Giants.

1905 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1905 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 79 wins and 74 losses, 26 games behind the New York Giants.

1905 Major League Baseball season

The 1905 Major League Baseball season, had the second modern World Series. The New York Giants defeated the Philadelphia Athletics to win the World Series.

1905 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1905 throughout the world.

1906 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1906 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 64–87, 51½ games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1907 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1907 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 66–87, 41½ games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1908 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1908 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the National League with a record of 73–81, 26 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1948 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1948 throughout the world.

Cincinnati Reds all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of December 31, 2014.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Cincinnati Reds National League franchise (1890–1953, 1958–present), also known previously as the Cincinnati Red Stockings (1882–1889) and Cincinnati Redlegs (1953–1958).

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

Cincinnati Reds award winners and league leaders

This article is a list of baseball players who are Cincinnati Reds players that are winners of Major League Baseball awards and recognitions, Reds awards and recognitions, and/or are league leaders in various statistical areas.

List of Major League Baseball annual home run leaders

In baseball, a home run is scored when the ball is hit so far that the batter is able to circle all the bases ending at home plate, scoring himself plus any runners already on base, with no errors by the defensive team on the play. An automatic home run is achieved by hitting the ball on the fly over the outfield fence in fair territory. More rarely, an inside-the-park home run occurs when the hitter reaches home plate while the baseball remains in play on the field. In Major League Baseball (MLB), a player in each league wins the home run title each season by hitting the most home runs that year. Only home runs hit in a particular league count towards that league's seasonal lead. Mark McGwire, for example, hit 58 home runs in 1997, more than any other player that year. However, McGwire was traded from the American League's (AL) Oakland Athletics to the National League's (NL) St. Louis Cardinals midway through the season and his individual AL and NL home run totals (34 and 24, respectively) did not qualify to lead either league.The first home run champion in the National League was George Hall. In the league's inaugural 1876 season, Hall hit five home runs for the short-lived National League Philadelphia Athletics. In 1901, the American League was established and Hall of Fame second baseman Nap Lajoie led it with 14 home runs for the American League Philadelphia Athletics. Over the course of his 22-season career, Babe Ruth led the American League in home runs 12 times. Mike Schmidt and Ralph Kiner have the second and third most home run titles respectively, Schmidt with eight and Kiner with seven, all won in the National League. Kiner's seven consecutive titles from 1946 to 1952 are also the most consecutive home run titles by any player.

Ruth set the Major League Baseball single-season home run record four times, first at 29 (1919), then 54 (1920), 59 (1921), and finally 60 (1927). Ruth's 1920 and 1921 seasons are tied for the widest margin of victory for a home run champion as he topped the next highest total by 35 home runs in each season. The single season mark of 60 stood for 34 years until Roger Maris hit 61 home runs in 1961. Maris' mark was broken 37 years later by both Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa during the 1998 home run record chase, with McGwire ultimately setting the mark at 70. Barry Bonds, who also has the most career home runs, set the current single season record of 73 in 2001. The 1998 and 2001 seasons each had 4 players hit 50 or more home runs – Greg Vaughn, Ken Griffey, Jr., Sosa, and McGwire in 1998 and Alex Rodriguez, Luis Gonzalez, Sosa, and Bonds in 2001. A player has hit 50 or more home runs 42 times, 25 times since 1990. The lowest home run total to lead a major league was four, recorded in the NL by Lip Pike in 1877 and Paul Hines in 1878.

List of Major League Baseball players (O)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active. As of the end of the 2011 season, there have been 320 players with a last name that begins with O who have been on a major league roster at some point.

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