Fred Hoey

Fred Hoey (1885[1] – November 17, 1949) was a major league baseball broadcaster. Hoey called games for the Boston Braves from 1925–38 and Boston Red Sox from 1927-38.

Hoey was born in Boston, but raised in Saxonville, Massachusetts. At the age of 12, Hoey saw his first baseball game during the 1897 Temple Cup. Hoey would later play semipro baseball and work as an usher at the Huntington Avenue Grounds.[2]

In 1903, Hoey was hired as a sportswriter, writing about high school sports, baseball, and hockey. In 1924, he became the first publicity director of the Boston Bruins. Hoey began broadcasting Braves games in 1925 and Red Sox games in 1927, becoming the first full-time announcer for both teams.

In 1933, Hoey was hired by CBS Radio to call Games 1 and 5 of the World Series after commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis declared that Ted Husing and Graham McNamee could not call World Series games because they did not call any regular season games.[1] Hoey was removed from the CBS broadcasting booth during the fourth inning of game one after his voice went out. Although reported as a cold, Hoey's garbled and incoherent words led many to think that Hoey was drunk.[1][2] After this incident, Hoey never went to the broadcast booth without a tin of throat lozenges.[1] His only other national assignment was calling the 1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, played in Boston, for Mutual.

After the 1936 season, Hoey was fired by the head of the Yankee Network, John Shepard III. Baseball fans, including Franklin D. Roosevelt rallied to his defense. After the 1938 season, Hoey demanded a raise, but the sponsors, despite public pressure, replaced Hoey with former player and manager Frankie Frisch. After leaving the booth, Hoey covered the Red Sox and Braves in Boston newspapers until 1946.[2]

Hoey died in Winthrop, Massachusetts, on November 17, 1949, of accidental gas asphyxiation.[2]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Ted Patterson. The Golden Voices of Baseball. Sports Publishing LLC. Retrieved 2008-09-27.
  2. ^ a b c d Curt Smith. Voices of Summer. Carroll & Graf Publishers. Retrieved 2008-09-27.
1899 New York Giants season

The 1899 New York Giants season was the franchise's 17th season. The team finished in tenth place in the National League with a 60-90 record, 42 games behind the Brooklyn Superbas.

1925 Boston Braves season

The 1925 Boston Braves season was the 55th season of the franchise.

1926 Boston Braves season

The 1926 Boston Braves season was the 56th season of the franchise.

1927 Boston Braves season

The 1927 Boston Braves season was the 57th season of the franchise. The Braves finished seventh in the National League with a record of 60 wins and 94 losses.

1927 Boston Red Sox season

The 1927 Boston Red Sox season was the 27th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 51 wins and 103 losses.

1928 Boston Red Sox season

The 1928 Boston Red Sox season was the 28th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 57 wins and 96 losses.

1929 Boston Braves season

The 1929 Boston Braves season was the 59th season of the franchise.

1929 Boston Red Sox season

The 1929 Boston Red Sox season was the 29th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 58 wins and 96 losses.

1930 Boston Braves season

The 1930 Boston Braves season was the 60th season of the franchise.

1930 Boston Red Sox season

The 1930 Boston Red Sox season was the 30th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 52 wins and 102 losses.

1931 Boston Braves season

The 1931 Boston Braves season was the 61st season of the franchise. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 64–90, 37 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1932 Boston Braves season

The 1932 Boston Braves season was the 62nd season of the franchise.

1933 Boston Braves season

The 1933 Boston Braves season was the 63rd season of the franchise.

1936 Boston Bees season

The 1936 Boston Bees season was the 66th season of the franchise. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 71–83, 21 games behind the New York Giants. This was their first season under the nickname of Bees, which they would keep until 1940.

1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the fourth playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 7, 1936, at National League Park in Boston, Massachusetts, the home of the Boston Bees of the National League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 4–3. It was the National League's first win in All-Star Game history.

Antigua Winds

Antigua Winds is a manufacturer of woodwind and brass instruments like saxophones, clarinets, trumpets, flutes, and musical instrument accessories. The company was founded in 1991 by musician and educator Fred Hoey in San Antonio, Texas. Antigua Winds specializes in professional and student instruments.

Fred Hoey (baseball manager)

Frederick Chamberlain "Fred" Hoey (January 21, 1865 – December 7, 1933) was a manager in Major League Baseball. In the 1899 season, with the New York Giants he was the club's manager. During his lone season as manager, he led the Giants to 31 wins, with 55 losses in 87 games.

He was born in New York City and died in Paris, France in 1933.

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