Fred Hetzel

Fred W. Hetzel (born July 21, 1942) is a retired American basketball player who played six seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA). He was an All-American college player for Davidson College. Hetzel was the No. 1 overall pick in the 1965 NBA draft by the San Francisco Warriors.

Fred Hetzel
Personal information
BornJuly 21, 1942 (age 76)
Washington, D.C.
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Listed weight220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High school
CollegeDavidson (1962–1965)
NBA draft1965 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1st overall
Selected by the San Francisco Warriors
Playing career1965–1971
PositionPower forward / Center
Number44, 21, 20, 30
Career history
19651968San Francisco Warriors
1968–1969Milwaukee Bucks
1969Cincinnati Royals
1969–1970Philadelphia 76ers
1970–1971Los Angeles Lakers
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points4,658
Rebounds2,444
Assists462
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Early life in D.C.

Hetzel initially attended Woodrow Wilson High School in Washington, D.C. and played for the Tigers in the 1958 season. He then transferred to Landon School in Bethesda, Maryland and was a 3 time All Met.[1] As a sophomore, he averaged 20.5 ppg and 20.4 ppg as a junior. As a 3 time All Met in the Washington Daily News, he followed in the footsteps of Lew Luce and George Leftwich as the only 3-peats. He averaged 24.1 ppg in his senior season and finished with 1,210 points during his Bears career. On March 2, 1961, Undefeated Landon and DeMatha Catholic High School (ranked 1-2 in the city) faced off in Cole Field House before a crowd of 6400. Fred Hetzel led Landon that night with 18 points but it was the tandem of John Austin and Gary Ward that led the Stags to victory 57-52.

College career

Hetzel played collegiately at Davidson College of the Southern Conference, recruited by Hall of Fame Coach Lefty Driesell. He was the Southern Conference Player of the Year in all three seasons for the Wildcats. Freshmen did not play varsity level, by NCAA rule in Hetzel's era. Davison lost in the Southern Conference tournament in all three seasons of Hetzel's career, negating NCAA Tournament trips.[2]

In 1962-1963, Hetzel averaged 23.7 points and 13.5 rebounds as Davidson finished 20-7.[3]

Davidson was 22-4 in 1963-1964, led by Hetzel's 27.3 points and 13.5 rebounds, winning the Southern Conference.[4]

As a senior, Davidson was 24-2, a perfect 12-0 in the Southern Conference in 1964-1965. behind Hetzel's 26.5 points and 14.8 rebound averages.[5] Heitzel was a consensus All-American in 1965, along with Bill Bradley of Princeton, Cazzie Russell of Michigan, Gail Goodrich of UCLA and Rick Barry of Miami (FL).[6]

Overall, Hetzel averaged (2032) 25.7 points and 13.8 rebounds in 79 games at Davidson, leading them to a 66-13 record over three seasons.[2]

Before Hazel embarked on his NBA career, he played for Team USA in the 1965 Fifth World University Games in Budapest, Hungary. He helped the United States to a gold medal that he displayed in his living room. He averaged 12.9 points in the eight games.[7][8]

Professional career

A 6 feet 8 inches (2.03 m) forward-center from Davidson, Hetzel was selected by the San Francisco Warriors with the first overall pick of the 1965 NBA draft on May 6, 1965.[9]

As a rookie, Hetzel was named to the 1966 NBA All-Rookie Team, along with Rick Barry, Billy Cunningham, Dick Van Arsdale and Tom Van Arsdale. Heitzel averaged 6. 8 points and 5.2 rebounds for Coach Alex Hannum and the Warriors, with Hall of Famers Rick Barry, Guy Rodgers and Nate Thurmond.[10][9]

In 1966-1967, the Warriors improved to 44-37 under Coach Bill Sharman and advanced to the 1967 NBA Finals, where they lost to Wilt Chamberlain and the Philadelphia 76ers 4-2. Hetzel averaged 9.3 points and 4.0 rebounds in the series as the Warriors' 6th man.[11] During the regular season, Hetzel was the teams 4th leading scorer with 12.2 points per game, along with 8.3 rebounds.[12]

In 1967-1968, Hetzel had his finest professional season, averaging 19.0 points and 7.1 rebounds for the Warriors. The team finished 49-39, and defeated the St. Louis Hawks in the playoffs, before being swept by the Los Angeles Lakers in the Western Division Finals.[13]

On May 6, 1968, Hetzel's Warrior career ended. He was chosen by the new Milwaukee Bucks from the San Francisco Warriors in the NBA expansion draft. During the 1968-1969 season, after 53 games with the Bucks, with Hetzel averaging 15.9 points and 8.9 rebounds, he was traded. On January 31, 1969 he was traded by the Bucks to the Cincinnati Royals for Zaid Abdul-Aziz and cash. He finished the year with averages of 14.4 points and 7.3 rebounds.[9]

Just before the start of the 1969-1970 season, on October 4, 1969, Hetzel was traded by the Cincinnati Royals to the Philadelphia 76ers for Craig Raymond and a future draft pick. Playing for Coach Jack Ramsey, Heitzel averaged 6.1 points and 3.3 rebounds in a reserve role for the 76ers.[9]

On May 11, 1970 Hetzel was again claimed by a new team, when he was drafted by the new Portland Trail Blazers from the Philadelphia 76ers in the NBA expansion draft. Later, on August 28, 1970 he was claimed on waivers by the Los Angeles Lakers from the Trail Blazers.[9]

Hetzel played 1970-1971 with the Lakers in his final season. He averaged 4.8 points and 2.9 rebounds in 59 games, playing a reserve role on a team with Hall of Famers Elgin Baylor, Wilt Chamberlain, Jerry West, Gail Goodrich and Pat Riley. The Lakers finished 48-34, losing to Lew Alcindor and the Milwaukee Bucks in the Western Division Finals.[14]

Overall, Hetzel played six seasons in the NBA (1965–1971), averaging 11.2 points and 5.9 rebounds in 416 games.[15]

Personal

Hetzel resides in Virginia and Florida and is in the Real Estate industry.[8]

Reflecting on his career, Hetzel said “I got injured and had some various problems that impacted my pro career,” he said.“I am happy to have had the experience of the NBA, to meet such great personalities and to have relationships with such great people is just special."[8]

Fred Hetzel's brother Will Hetzel played at Maryland from 1967-1970, averaging 18.0 points and 9.1 rebounds in his career. Will Hetzel played for Coach Lefty Drisell in his senior year at Maryland.[16]

Fred and Will Hetzel's father, Fred Sr, played basketball at Maryland from 1928-1930.[17]

Honors

  • In 1985, Hetzel was inducted into the Washington D.C. Metropolitan Basketball Hall of Fame.[18]
  • Hetzel was inducted into the Davidson Hall of Fame in 1990.[19]
  • In 2010, Hetzel was inducted into the Southern Conference Hall of Fame.[20]

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.landon.net/sports/team-page/~athletics-team-id/48
  2. ^ a b "Fred Hetzel College Stats". College Basketball at Sports-Reference.com.
  3. ^ "1962-63 Davidson Wildcats Roster and Stats". College Basketball at Sports-Reference.com.
  4. ^ "1963-64 Davidson Wildcats Roster and Stats". College Basketball at Sports-Reference.com.
  5. ^ "1964-65 Davidson Wildcats Roster and Stats". College Basketball at Sports-Reference.com.
  6. ^ "Consensus All-America Teams (1959-60 to 1968-69)". College Basketball at Sports-Reference.com.
  7. ^ "FIFTH WORLD UNIVERSITY GAMES -- 1965". www.usab.com.
  8. ^ a b c Geddie, John. "Leesburg resident inducted into SoCon Hall of Fame". LoudounTimes.com.
  9. ^ a b c d e "Fred Hetzel Stats". Basketball-Reference.com.
  10. ^ "1965-66 San Francisco Warriors Roster and Stats". Basketball-Reference.com.
  11. ^ "1967 NBA Finals - San Francisco Warriors vs. Philadelphia 76ers". Basketball-Reference.com.
  12. ^ "1966-67 San Francisco Warriors Roster and Stats". Basketball-Reference.com.
  13. ^ "1967-68 San Francisco Warriors Roster and Stats". Basketball-Reference.com.
  14. ^ "1970-71 Los Angeles Lakers Roster and Stats". Basketball-Reference.com.
  15. ^ https://www.basketball-reference.com/players/h/hetzefr01.html
  16. ^ "Will Hetzel College Stats". College Basketball at Sports-Reference.com.
  17. ^ https://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/terps/bs-sp-catching-up-with-will-hetzel-20150317-story.html
  18. ^ "wmbhall". wmbhall.
  19. ^ "Fred Hetzel '65 (1990) - Hall of Fame". Davidson College Athletics.
  20. ^ "2010 Hall of Fame - Fred Hetzel". Official Internet Home of the Southern Conference.

External links

1963 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1963 College Basketball All-American team as determined by aggregating the results of five major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International, the National Association of Basketball Coaches, and the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA). 1963 was the last year that the NEA was used to determine consensus All-American teams.

1964 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1964 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, the United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1965 NBA draft

The 1965 NBA draft was the 19th annual draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on May 6, 1965, before the 1965–66 season.

In this draft, nine NBA teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players. A player who had finished his four-year college eligibility was eligible for selection. If a player left college early, he would not be eligible for selection until his college class graduated. Teams that finished last in each division, the San Francisco Warriors and the New York Knicks, were awarded the first four picks in the draft. The remaining first-round picks and the subsequent rounds were assigned to teams in reverse order of their win–loss record in the previous season.

Before the draft, a team could forfeit its first-round draft pick and then select any player from within a 50-mile radius of its home arena as their territorial pick. The draft consisted of 17 rounds comprising 112 players selected. This draft was the last in which the territorial pick rule remained in effect, before it was eliminated prior to the 1966 draft.

1965 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1965 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1965–66 NBA season

The 1965–66 NBA Season was the 20th season of the National Basketball Association. The season ended with the Boston Celtics winning an unprecedented 8th straight NBA Championship, beating the Los Angeles Lakers 4 games to 3 in the 1966 NBA Finals.

1965–66 San Francisco Warriors season

The 1965–66 NBA season was the Warriors' 20th season in the NBA and 4th in the San Francisco Bay Area.

1968 NBA expansion draft

The 1968 NBA Expansion Draft was the fourth expansion draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on May 6, 1968, so that the newly founded Milwaukee Bucks and Phoenix Suns could acquire players for the upcoming 1968–69 season. Milwaukee and Phoenix had been awarded the expansion teams on January 22, 1968. In an NBA expansion draft, new NBA teams are allowed to acquire players from the previously established teams in the league. Not all players on a given team are available during an expansion draft, since each team can protect a certain number of players from being selected. In this draft, each of the twelve other NBA teams had protected seven players from their roster. After each round, where each the Suns and the Bucks had selected one player, the existing teams added another player to their protected list. The draft continued until both teams had selected eighteen unprotected players each, while the existing teams had lost three players each.

The Milwaukee Bucks were formed and owned by a group of investors headed by Wesley Pavalon and Marvin Fishman, which called the Milwaukee Professional Sports and Services, Inc. (Milwaukee Pro). The Bucks were the second NBA team from Milwaukee, after the Milwaukee Hawks, which moved to St. Louis in 1955 and then Atlanta in 1968, becoming the Atlanta Hawks. The Bucks' selections included former first overall pick Fred Hetzel, six-time All-Star Larry Costello, five-time All-Star Wayne Embry, four-time All-Star Guy Rodgers and one-time All-Star Len Chappell. Prior to the expansion draft, Costello retired from playing due to injury and was named as the franchise's first head coach. Ten players from the expansion draft joined the Bucks for their inaugural season, but only three played more than one season for the team. Jon McGlocklin, who played eight seasons with the Bucks, was named to the 1969 All-Star Game, becoming the franchise's first All-Star. He was the only player from the expansion draft that was on the Bucks team that won the NBA championship in 1971. Embry was later inducted to the Basketball Hall of Fame as a contributor.The Phoenix Suns were formed and owned by a group of investors headed by Richard Bloch. Former Chicago Bulls head coach and 1967 Coach of the Year Johnny Kerr was named as the franchise's first head coach. The Suns' selections included territorial picks Gail Goodrich and George Wilson. Eight players from the expansion draft joined the Suns for their inaugural season, but only five played more than one season for the team. John Wetzel was the ninth player from the expansion draft to play for the Suns. He made his first appearance in 1970 after serving in the military for two years. Goodrich and Dick Van Arsdale were named to the 1969 All-Star Game, becoming the franchise's first All-Stars. Van Arsdale played nine seasons with the Suns and became the Suns' franchise leader in games played when he retired in 1977, a record which has since been broken by Alvan Adams and Walter Davis. Goodrich played two seasons with the Suns and was later inducted to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a player.

1968–69 Milwaukee Bucks season

The 1968–69 NBA season was the Bucks' inaugural season in the NBA.

1970 NBA expansion draft

The 1970 NBA Expansion Draft was the fifth expansion draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on May 11, 1970, so that the newly founded Buffalo Braves, Cleveland Cavaliers and Portland Trail Blazers could acquire players for the upcoming 1970–71 season. Buffalo, Cleveland and Portland had been awarded the expansion teams on February 6, 1970. The Braves later underwent several name changes and relocations before moving to Los Angeles. They are currently known as the Los Angeles Clippers. In an NBA expansion draft, new NBA teams are allowed to acquire players from the previously established teams in the league. Not all players on a given team are available during an expansion draft, since each team can protect a certain number of players from being selected. In this draft, each of the fourteen other NBA teams had protected seven players from their roster. After each round, where each of the expansion teams had selected one player each, the existing teams added another player to their protected list. In the first round, the Braves had the first pick, while the Blazers and the Cavaliers had the second and the third pick respectively. In the subsequent rounds, the Braves and the Cavaliers exchanged their order of selection, while the Blazers had the second pick throughout the draft. The draft continued until all three teams had selected eleven unprotected players each, while the existing teams had lost two or three players each.The Buffalo Braves were formed and owned by local businessman Paul Snyder. He hired former Philadelphia 76ers head coach and 1966 Coach of the Year Dolph Schayes as the franchise's first head coach. The Braves' selections included six-time All-Star Bailey Howell. However, Howell was immediately traded to the Philadelphia 76ers in exchange for Bob Kauffman and a future second-round pick. Nine players from the expansion draft joined the Braves for their inaugural season, but only three played more than one season for the team.

The Cleveland Cavaliers were formed and owned by businessman Nick Mileti. He hired former college basketball coach Bill Fitch as the franchise's first head coach. The Cavaliers' selections included five-time All-Star Don Ohl and one-time All-Star Len Chappell. However, Ohl retired from playing prior to the start of the season and Chappell only played briefly before he was waived. Eight players from the expansion draft joined the Cavaliers for their inaugural season, but only four played more than one season for the team. Butch Beard was the ninth player from the expansion draft to play for the Cavaliers. After one year serving in the military, he started playing with the Cavaliers in the 1971–72 season. Bingo Smith played nine and a half seasons with the Cavaliers before he was traded to the San Diego Clippers in 1979. He became the Cavaliers' franchise leader in games played when he left, a record which has since been broken by Danny Ferry and Žydrūnas Ilgauskas.The Portland Trail Blazers were formed by Harry Glickman, who created the franchise through the financers turned co-owners Larry Weinberg, Herman Sarkowsky and Robert Shmertz. They hired former college basketball coach Rolland Todd as the franchise's first head coach. The Blazers' selections included former first overall pick Fred Hetzel and former third pick Larry Siegfried. However, Hetzel was waived without playing a game for the Blazers and Siegfried was immediately traded to the San Diego Rockets in exchange for Jim Barnett. Six players from the expansion draft joined the Blazers for their inaugural season, but only three played more than one season for the team.

Davidson Wildcats men's basketball

The Davidson Wildcats basketball team is the basketball team that represents Davidson College in Davidson, North Carolina, in the NCAA Division I. The school's team currently competes in the Atlantic 10 Conference. The team last played in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament in 2018. The Wildcats are currently coached by Bob McKillop. Davidson plays its home games at the Belk Arena in Baker Sports Complex on the school's campus.

Golden State Warriors all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Golden State Warriors NBA franchise. Players in bold denote current players on the Warriors' roster. Current as of 2017–18 NBA season.

Hetzel (surname)

Hetzel is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Amy Hetzel (born 1983), Australian water polo player

Basil Hetzel (born 1922), Australian medical researcher

Eric Hetzel (born 1963), American baseball player

Fred Hetzel (born 1942), American basketball player

George Hetzel (1826–1899), American painter

Pierre-Jules Hetzel (1814–1886), French editor and publisher

Landon School

Landon School is a private, nonsectarian, college preparatory school for boys in grades 3–12, with an enrollment of approximately 680 students, in Bethesda, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C.

List of 1969–70 NBA season transactions

These are the list of personnel changes in the NBA from the 1969–70 NBA season.

List of first overall NBA draft picks

The National Basketball Association's first overall pick is the player who is selected first among all eligible draftees by a team during the annual National Basketball Association (NBA) draft. The first pick is awarded to the team that wins the NBA draft lottery; in most cases, that team had a losing record in the previous season. The team with the first pick attracts significant media attention, as does the player who is selected with that pick.

Eleven first picks have won the NBA Most Valuable Player Award: Oscar Robertson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (record six-time winner), Bill Walton, Magic Johnson (three-time winner), Hakeem Olajuwon, David Robinson, Shaquille O'Neal, Allen Iverson, Tim Duncan (two-time winner), LeBron James (four-time winner), and Derrick Rose (youngest winner).

Since the advent of the draft lottery in 1985, seven number one overall picks have won an NBA title. They are David Robinson, Shaquille O'Neal, Glenn Robinson, Tim Duncan, LeBron James, Andrew Bogut, and Kyrie Irving.

China's Yao Ming (2002) and Italy's Andrea Bargnani (2006) are the only two players without competitive experience in the United States to be drafted first overall. Eleven other international players with U.S. college experience have been drafted first overall—Mychal Thompson (Bahamas) in 1978, Hakeem Olajuwon (Nigeria) in 1984, Patrick Ewing (Jamaica) in 1985, Tim Duncan (U.S. Virgin Islands) in 1997, Michael Olowokandi (Nigeria) in 1998, Andrew Bogut (Australia) in 2005, Kyrie Irving (Australia) in 2011, Anthony Bennett (Canada) in 2013, Andrew Wiggins (Canada) in 2014, Ben Simmons (Australia) in 2016, and Deandre Ayton (Bahamas) in 2018. Duncan is an American citizen, but is considered an "international" player by the NBA because he was not born in one of the fifty states or the District of Columbia. Ewing had dual Jamaican-American citizenship when he was drafted and Irving and Simmons had dual Australian-American citizenship when they were drafted.

Note that the drafts between 1947 and 1949 were held by the Basketball Association of America (BAA). The Basketball Association of America became the National Basketball Association after absorbing teams from the National Basketball League in the fall of 1949. Official NBA publications include the BAA Drafts as part of the NBA's draft history.

List of highest-scoring NBA games

In basketball, points are used to keep track of the score in a game. Points can be accumulated by making field goals (worth two points from within the three-point line or three points from beyond the three-point line) or free throws (worth one point). The team that records the most points at the end of a game is declared the game's winner. If the game is still tied at the end of regulation play, additional overtime period(s) are played in order to determine the winner.

Teams only averaged around 80 points per game in the years following the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) in 1946. Before the introduction of the shot clock, teams often ran out the clock by passing the ball more frequently after they established a lead in a game. If one team chose to stall, the other team (especially if behind) would often commit fouls to regain possession. This resulted in very low-scoring games with many fouls, affecting attendance by making fans irritable. Starting in the 1954–55 season, the NBA implemented a 24-second shot clock. If the offensive team fails to hit the rim with the ball within the allotted time, they would lose possession. This innovation resulted in much higher scoring games. All of the highest-scoring games in the NBA have happened during the shot-clock era.

Milwaukee Bucks all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Milwaukee Bucks NBA franchise.

Southern Conference Hall of Fame

The Southern Conference Hall of Fame, located in Spartanburg, South Carolina, USA, is a hall of fame devoted to former Southern Conference student-athletes, coaches, and administrators. The Hall of Fame, with an inaugural class of 10, was established in 2009. The second class for 2010 included seven former conference greats.

Southern Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Southern Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year is a basketball award given to the Southern Conference's (SoCon) most outstanding player. The award was first given following the 1951–52 season. Fred Hetzel of Davidson is the only player to have won the award three times (1963–1965). Fifteen other players have won the award twice, most recently done by Fletcher Magee of Wofford (2018, 2019).

Davidson has the most all-time winners with 13, but it left the SoCon after the 2013–14 season to join the Atlantic 10 Conference. Among current members, Furman leads with 12 winners. There have also been nine ties in the award's history, but only one (1970–71 season) which occurred prior to the 1989–90 season. That season was the first for two separate Player of the Year awards—one by the Southern Conference men's basketball coaches, and the other by conference media members. When both the coaches and media select the same player, he is the consensus conference player of the year.

The only current members that have never had a winner are Samford and Mercer. Both are among the SoCon's newer members, having respectively joined in 2008 and 2014.

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