Fred Hansen

Frederick Morgan "Fred" Hansen (born December 29, 1940) is an American former athlete who competed mainly in the pole vault.[1]

A 1963 graduate of Rice University, he competed for the United States in the 1964 Summer Olympics held in Tokyo, Japan in the pole vault where he won the gold medal.[3] He held the world record in the Pole Vault for almost 2 years, first set as 5.23 m (17 ft 1 34 in) on June 13, 1964 and then improved to 5.28 m (17 ft 3 34 in) on July 25, 1964 at the USA vs USSR dual meet at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.[1][2][4]

Fred Hansen
Fred Hansen 1960s
Hansen in the 1960s
Personal information
Full nameFrederick Morgan Hansen
BornDecember 29, 1940 (age 78)
Cuero, Texas, U.S.[1]
Height183 cm (6 ft 0 in)[1]
Weight75 kg (165 lb)
Sport
SportAthletics
Event(s)Pole vault, long jump
ClubRice Owls, Houston
Achievements and titles
Personal best(s)PV – 5.28 m (1964)
LJ – 7.26 m (1961)[1][2]

1964 Olympics

Going into the 1964 Olympics, the United States had never lost an Olympic pole vault competition. In the final, the last remaining American was Hansen, who at the time was also the world record holder. The field included two other previous world record holders and decathlete C. K. Yang. Hansen cleared 5 meters on his first attempt, but so did three German athletes. Hansen then passed the next height, watching as only Wolfgang Reinhardt was able to clear. Re-entering the competition at 5.10, Hansen failed his first two attempts, but so did Reinhardt. Hansen then sailed over his final attempt, while Reinhart could not. Hansen continued the American streak, which would survive through one more Olympics until the 1972 pole vault controversy, when defending champion Bob Seagren had his pole confiscated at the games and had to compete on an unfamiliar, borrowed pole.

Other achievements

Besides pole vault Hansen competed in the long jump. He was also an avid golfer and played at the 1980 U.S. Amateur golf championship.[1] He currently is a practicing dentist in Houston, Texas, in the Memorial area of town. He was Inducted into the Texas Track and Field Coaches Hall of Fame, Class of 2016.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill. "Fred Hansen". Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on August 30, 2013.
  2. ^ a b Fred Hansen. trackfield.brinkster.net
  3. ^ "Athletics at the 1964 Tokyo Summer Games: Men's pole vault". Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on November 5, 2012. Retrieved April 30, 2011.
  4. ^ Video on YouTube @1:10
  5. ^ http://ttfca2.wixsite.com/txtfhalloffame/inductees. wixsite.com

External links

Records
Preceded by
United States John Pennel
Men's pole vault world record holder
June 13, 1964 – May 14, 1966
Succeeded by
United States Bob Seagren
Athletics at the 1964 Summer Olympics

At the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, the athletics competition included 36 events, 24 for men and 12 for women. The women's 400 metres and women's pentathlon events were newly introduced at these Games. There were a total number of 1016 participating athletes from 82 countries.

Athletics at the 1964 Summer Olympics – Men's pole vault

The men's pole vault was one of four men's jumping events on the Athletics at the 1964 Summer Olympics program in Tokyo. Qualification was held on 15 October 1964, with the final on 17 October. 32 athletes from 20 nations entered, with 1 not starting in the qualification round. The final lasted over seven hours, to date the longest competition in history. All finalists qualified at 4.60, however in the final five were unable to achieve the height again.

At the time, the United States had never lost an Olympic pole vault competition. In the final, the last remaining American was Fred Hansen, who at the time was also the world record holder. Hansen cleared 5 meters on his first attempt, but so did three German athletes, making it a four way tie. Hansen passed the next height, watching as only Wolfgang Reinhardt was able to clear. Re-entering the competition at 5.10, Hansen failed his first two attempts, but so did Reinhardt. Hansen then sailed over his final attempt, while Reinhart could not. Hansen continued the American streak, which would survive through one more Olympics until the 1972 pole vault controversy, when defending champion Bob Seagren had his pole confiscated at the games and had to compete on an unfamiliar, borrowed pole.

Dick Emberger

Dick Emberger (born July 3, 1938) is an American athlete. He competed in the men's decathlon at the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Ed Red

Walter Edward "Ed" Red (born March 6, 1942) is an American athlete. He competed in the men's javelin throw at the 1964 Summer Olympics. Known as Ed Red, he had one of the shortest names of any Olympian.

Fred Hansen (footballer)

Frederick William Percy Hansen (31 May 1903 – 15 November 1993) was an Australian rules footballer who played with Footscray and Hawthorn in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

Gayle Hopkins

Gayle Patrick Hopkins (November 7, 1941 – March 20, 2016) was an American long jumper who competed in the 1964 Summer Olympics. He was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Janell Smith

Janell Smith (born May 3, 1947) is an American sprinter. She competed in the women's 400 metres at the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Jay Luck

James Edward "Jay" Luck (born July 11, 1940) is a retired American hurdler and sprinter who mostly competed in the 400 m hurdles. He placed fifth at the 1964 Summer Olympics. At the AAU championships, he was fourth in 1961–62, second in 1964, and third in 1965.

John Pennel

John Thomas Pennel (July 25, 1940 – September 26, 1993) was an American pole vaulter, and four-time world record holder.

Kent Floerke

Kent Floerke (born January 16, 1936) is an American athlete. He competed in the men's triple jump at the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Lacey O'Neal

Lacey O'Neal (born March 30, 1944) is an American hurdler. She competed in the women's 80 metres hurdles at the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Les Tipton

Les Tipton (born March 19, 1942) is an American athlete. He competed in the men's javelin throw at the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Men's pole vault world record progression

The first world record in the men's pole vault was recognised by the International Association of Athletics Federations in 1912.As of June 21, 2009, 71 world records have been ratified by the IAAF in the event. The introduction in the early 1950s of flexible vaulting poles made from composites such as fiberglass or carbon fiber allowed vaulters to achieve greater height.

Oscar Moore (athlete)

Oscar W. Moore Jr. (born March 31, 1938) is an American long-distance runner. He competed in the men's 5000 metres at the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Paul Herman (athlete)

Paul Herman (born March 7, 1941) is an American athlete. He competed in the men's decathlon at the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Paul K. Wright

Paul Kenneth Wright is a mechanical engineer best known for work on the UC Berkeley-based CyberCut/CyberBuild project, which established a set of standards that streamlined the conversion of creative manufacturing designs into rapid prototyping. Wright's NYU research group (led by Israel Greenfeld, Fred Hansen, and Louie Pavlakos) is also known for developing the first open-architecture control-of-manufacturing systems, and for developing Internet-based CAD/CAM systems.

Terri Brown

Terri Brown (born September 27, 1947) is an American athlete. She competed in the women's high jump at the 1964 Summer Olympics.

The Boys Are Back (TV series)

The Boys Are Back is an American sitcom that was aired on CBS from September 11, 1994, to January 28, 1995. It stars Suzanne Pleshette and Hal Linden as parents Jackie and Fred Hansen. The show was broadcast on Wednesdays at 8 p.m. Eastern time.

Vic Zwolak

Victor Andrew Zwolak (born November 30, 1938) is an American middle-distance runner. He competed in the men's 3000 metres steeplechase at the 1964 Summer Olympics.

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