Fred Dean

Frederick Rudolph Dean (born February 24, 1952) is a former American football player in the National Football League, and a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. His career started with the San Diego Chargers in 1975 and ended with the San Francisco 49ers after the 1985 season. A two-time first-team All-Pro and a four-time Pro Bowler, he won two Super Bowls with the 49ers.

Fred Dean
No. 71, 74
Position:Defensive end
Personal information
Born:February 24, 1952 (age 67)
Arcadia, Louisiana
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:230 lb (104 kg)
Career information
High school:Ruston (Ruston, Louisiana)
College:Louisiana Tech
NFL Draft:1975 / Round: 2 / Pick: 33
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:141
Games started:83
Interceptions:1
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Dean was born in Arcadia, the seat of Bienville Parish in north Louisiana. His family moved twenty miles east to Ruston, where he graduated from Ruston High School.

College career

Dean was a standout at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, having spurned an opportunity to play for legendary coach Eddie Robinson at nearby Grambling State University, which at the time was sending African American players to the NFL on a yearly basis. Dean excelled as an All-Southland Conference defensive tackle during his collegiate football career at Louisiana Tech.

NFL career

San Diego Chargers

Dean was drafted by the Chargers in the 2nd round (33rd overall pick) 1975 NFL Draft. Dean recorded 15½ sacks in 1978.[1] In 1979, the Chargers won the AFC West division while leading the AFC in fewest points allowed (246) and Dean was named to the All-AFC team. The Chargers again won the AFC West in 1980, with Dean teaming with fellow 1975 Charger draftees Gary "Big Hands" Johnson and Louie Kelcher as the Chargers led the NFL in sacks (60).[2][3] Dean had missed the first two games of the season after not reporting, but still finished the season with 10½ sacks.[4] He and Johnson were named First-team All-Pro, with Kelcher being named Second-team All-Pro. The trio, along with Leroy Jones formed a defensive front that was locally nicknamed the Bruise Brothers.[2][3]

San Francisco 49ers

In 1981, Dean, was traded to the San Francisco 49ers due to a contract dispute with Chargers' ownership.[5] Dean contends he was making the same amount of money as his brother-in-law who was a truck driver.[6] The Chargers' defense would not be the same afterwards, and Don "Air" Coryell's Chargers teams are now most remembered for its high-scoring, pass-oriented offense that did not have enough defense to make it to a Super Bowl. In 2013, U-T San Diego called the Chargers trading Dean "perhaps the biggest blunder in franchise history."[7]

Dean was acquired mid-season by the 49ers and eventually helped them win two Super Bowls in the 1980s. His first game as a 49er was a key match-up against the Dallas Cowboys. Dean played after only a couple of practices and was still able to apply pressure and repeatedly hurried Danny White when he was not recording one of his 6 sacks, in a game won by the 49ers, 45-14. His first action of the season as a 49er was noted by author Tom Danyluk as "the greatest set of downs I have ever seen unleashed by a pass rusher".[8] In what had been a game of possum, Bill Walsh, the 49er head coach, said to John Madden, who covered the game, "Fred (Dean) just got here . . . If he plays, he won't play much".[9] But, he played the whole game.[10]

His next home game for the 49ers was against the Los Angeles Rams. The game was won by the 49ers and the first win against the Rams in Candlestick Park, 20-17, as Dean sacked Pat Haden 5 times. He ended the season with 13 sacks, 12 with the 49ers and 1 with the Chargers, prior to his trade.

The 49ers went on to win the Super Bowl that year, and Steve Sabol (NFL Films) is quoted in 2006 as saying that Dean's acquisition was the last meaningful in-season trade, in that it affected the destination of the Lombardi Trophy.[11] Dean that year won UPI NFC Defensive Player of the Year while playing in 11 games for the 49ers. San Diego's defense collapsed when Dean departed, giving up 40 points in a loss to the Cincinnati Bengals in the regular season, and 65 total points in playoff games vs. the Miami Dolphins and Bengals.

"I can't say how much it affected us, because we did make it to the AFC championship game," said Johnson of the Chargers without Dean. "But I could say if we had more pass rush from the corner, it might've been different.[12]

The Charger defense did not return to the top half of the NFL rankings again until the unit was rebuilt in the late 1980s, and the club did not have an effective pass rusher until Leslie O'Neal was drafted in 1986.

In 1983 Dean recorded 17 sacks to lead the NFC and recorded a then-NFL record of 6 in one game, setting that mark during the 49ers’ 27-0 shutout of the New Orleans Saints on November 13, 1983. The 17 sacks was a Dean career high, bettering his 1978 total of 15½ with the Chargers.[13] He followed that 1978 season by adding nine sacks in 1979 and 10½ in 1980. He had recorded 6½ sacks as a rookie in 1975. Dean's career sack total, with his unofficial numbers included, is 93.[14]

Dean was also a key player on the 49ers 1984 Super Bowl team, mostly used as a situational pass rusher. During the 1984 season, Dean was reunited with his Charger teammates, Johnson, Kelcher and Billy Shields.

Dean was inducted into the Louisiana Tech University Athletic Hall of Fame in 1990. Dean is a member of the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame. On August 2, 2008, Dean, an outspoken Christian, was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[15] He was inducted at the enshrinement ceremony where his bust, sculpted by Scott Myers, was unveiled.[16][17][18] In 2009 Dean was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame.

References

  1. ^ 2008 San Diego Chargers Media Guide (accessed October 18, 2008)
  2. ^ a b "Grambling State University Loses Two Football Legends". FoxSports.com. Fox Sports Interactive Media, LLC. August 11, 2010. Archived from the original on May 27, 2011.
  3. ^ a b "No. 16: Chargers' best draft class". ESPN.com. March 28, 2009. Retrieved May 27, 2011. The 2001 class was good, but the 1975 class ranks the best. San Diego had four of the first 33 picks in the draft, and the Chargers selected three defensive linemen that would form the nucleus of "The Bruise Brothers" and once formed three-fourths of the AFC Pro Bowl defensive line.(subscription required)
  4. ^ Smith, Rick (1981). 1981 San Diego Chargers Facts Book. San Diego Chargers. p. 28.
  5. ^ "Say It Ain't So". CNN Sports Illustrated (accessed October 18, 2008)
  6. ^ Wilson, Bernie (July 31, 2008). "Charger-turned-Niner Fred Dean answers Hall's call". USA Today. Retrieved November 3, 2008.
  7. ^ Krasovic, Tom (June 5, 2013). "Chargers had a Fearsome Foursome, too". U-T San Diego. Archived from the original on January 27, 2014.
  8. ^ Danyluk, Tom; Zimmerman, Paul (January 1, 2005). The Super '70s. Mad Uke Publishing. ISBN 9780977038305.
  9. ^ Madden, John; Anderson, Dave (October 1, 1987). One knee equals two feet: (and everything else you need to know about football). Jove Books. ISBN 9780515091939.
  10. ^ Conetzkey, Chris (August 1, 2008). "Defensive end Fred Dean: In the words of ..." ESPN. Retrieved July 31, 2017. 10 or 12 plays turned into a whole game against the Dallas Cowboys
  11. ^ Thomas, Jim (July 30, 2008). "Fred Dean: Trade to 49ers proves beneficial for player and team". The Patriot Ledger. Retrieved July 31, 2017. It’s been called the trade of all in-season football trades by NFL Films’ Steve Sabol.
  12. ^ Thomas, Jim (July 30, 2008). "Fred Dean: Situational pass-rusher made most of his opportunities". The State Journal-Register. Archived from the original on February 7, 2016.
  13. ^ "Fred Dean | Pro Football Hall of Fame Official Site". www.profootballhof.com. Retrieved April 12, 2016.
  14. ^ 49ers.pressdemocrat.com
  15. ^ "Years - Hall of Famers | Pro Football Hall of Fame Official Site". www.profootballhof.com. Retrieved April 12, 2016.
  16. ^ Price, Taylor (December 2, 2008). "Fred Dean: Life After the Hall of Fame". 49ers.com. Retrieved July 31, 2017.
  17. ^ Gosset, Brian (July 27, 2015). "Granbury sculptor says making Hall of Fame bust of Haley 'special'". Star-Telegram. Retrieved July 31, 2017.
  18. ^ "Fred Dean with his wife Pam, and his bust". 49ers.com. August 3, 2008. Archived from the original (Photo) on August 1, 2017. Retrieved July 31, 2017.
1971 Pioneer Bowl

The 1971 Pioneer Bowl was a college football bowl game in Texas, played between the Louisiana Tech Bulldogs and Eastern Michigan Hurons at Memorial Stadium in Wichita Falls. The inaugural edition of the Pioneer Bowl, it was one of four regional finals in the College Division played on December 11.

1975 San Diego Chargers season

The 1975 San Diego Chargers season began with the team trying to improve on their 5–9 record in 1974. Instead, the Chargers lost their first eleven games amidst attendances under 30,000, along with considerable off-field problems as several regular players wanted to leave and the franchise knew it would not get first choice in the 1976 draft due to the expansion Seahawks and Buccaneers.

By the beginning of December, the prospect of the first winless and tieless season since World War II loomed, and led to serious discussion of the Chargers’ plight in the press – although that press acknowledged that even with three games to go the Chargers had a genuine chance to win facing fellow cellar-dwellers the Jets and Kansas City. The Chargers eventually finished 2–12, tying the New Orleans Saints for the NFL’s worst record. The team suffered badly from injuries, most critically running back Don Woods, who had been AFC Rookie of the Year in 1974, but played only the first four games in this season. 1975 would remain as the Chargers’ poorest until a 1–15 disaster in 2000.

1979 San Diego Chargers season

The 1979 San Diego Chargers season was the team's 20th season, and 10th in the National Football League. Their 12–4 record was tied for the best in the league in 1979.

The 1979 Chargers finished in first place in the AFC West after having finished 9–7 in 1978. The Chargers made the playoffs for the first time in 14 years. Chargers quarterback Dan Fouts threw for more than 4,000 yards, and wide receivers Charlie Joiner and John Jefferson both gained more than 1,000 yards receiving. The Chargers became the first AFC West champion to run more passing plays (541) then rushing (481).The season ended with a playoff loss to the Houston Oilers.

As part of a marketing campaign, the Chargers created their fight song, "San Diego Super Chargers".The 2006 edition of Pro Football Prospectus, listed the 1979 Chargers as one of their "Heartbreak Seasons", in which teams "dominated the entire regular season only to falter in the playoffs, unable to close the deal." Said Pro Football Prospectus of the team, "the creative [head coach] Don Coryell always designed potent offenses, but the San Diego defense didn't catch up until 1979. ... In their first playoff game, the Chargers hosted a Houston Oilers team missing running back Earl Campbell and quarterback Dan Pastorini and fell on their faces. Fouts threw five interceptions and no touchdowns, and the Chargers blew a third quarter lead and lost 17–14. The Chargers would not have the best record in the NFL again until the 2006 season. They would not have another top ten defense in points allowed until 1989. They would not win 12 games in a season until 2004. Their best shot at glory went horribly awry, thanks to the worst game in the illustrious career of Dan Fouts."

1980 San Diego Chargers season

The 1980 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 11th season in the National Football League (NFL), and its 21st overall. the team failed to improve on their 12–4 record in 1979 and finished 11-5. They won their first playoff game in 17 years. The season ended with loss to the Raiders in the playoffs.

Dan Fouts broke his own record with over 4,500 yards passing, with 30 touchdowns. The Chargers finished #1 in total offense #2 in scoring. The defensive unit finished #6, leading the NFL with 60 QB sacks. The Chargers finished 11-5, winning the tiebreaker with the Oakland Raiders for the AFC West crown.

To help bolster a sagging running game, Running back Chuck Muncie was traded from the New Orleans Saints mid-season.The Chargers Achilles heel that season was turnovers which they led the league in giveaways. In the Divisional Round against Buffalo, a 50-yard touchdown pass from Fouts to Ron Smith in the final 3 minutes of the game lifted the Chargers to a 20-14 win. In the AFC Championship Game, big plays and turnovers got the Chargers down, 28 to 7. The Chargers comeback fell short as the Raiders hung on to win 34-27, with Oakland running out the final 7 minutes of the 4th quarter.

1981 All-Pro Team

The 1981 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1981. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The Associated Press added a "nose tackle" position in 1981, joining Pro Football Weekly .

1981 Pro Bowl

The 1981 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 31st annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1980 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 1, 1981, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 21, AFC 7.Sam Rutigliano of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Atlanta Falcons head coach Leeman Bennett. The referee was Gordon McCarter.

1981 San Diego Chargers season

The 1981 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 12th season in the National Football League (NFL) and its 22nd overall. The team failed to improve on their 11–5 record from 1980 and finished 10-6. In the playoffs, they beat the Dolphins in a game known as the Epic in Miami and lost to the Bengals in a game known as the Freezer Bowl.

1981 was the second straight season in which the Chargers reached the AFC Championship Game, as well as their second consecutive loss.

Running back Chuck Muncie enjoyed his best season, running for 1,144 yards and 19 touchdowns, tying the then-NFL season record for rushing touchdowns.During this season, the Chargers lost two key players by way of trade. Before Week 3, wide receiver John Jefferson was dealt to the Green Bay Packers, while defensive end Fred Dean would be dealt to the eventual Super Bowl champion San Francisco 49ers by Week 5. The season was chronicled on September 18, 2008 for America's Game: The Missing Rings, as one of the five greatest NFL teams to never win the Super Bowl.

Bruise Brothers (San Diego Chargers)

The Bruise Brothers were a group of American football players who played on the defensive line for the San Diego Chargers (now known as the Los Angeles Chargers) in the National Football League (NFL). The foursome, consisting of Fred Dean, Gary Johnson, Louie Kelcher, and Leroy Jones, formed one of the most dominant lines of their era. The Chargers selected Johnson, Kelcher, and Dean in the first two rounds of the 1975 NFL Draft, and they traded for Jones the following year. They helped San Diego lead the league in sacks in 1980.

Dan Fouts

Daniel Francis Fouts (born June 10, 1951) is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL). Fouts played his entire professional career with the San Diego Chargers from 1973, through 1987. He was one of the most prolific passing quarterbacks during the 1970s, and 1980s, but the Chargers were unable to make it to the Super Bowl during his fifteen-year career. He led the NFL in passing yards four straight years from 1979 to 1982 and became the first player in history to throw for 4,000 yards in three consecutive seasons.

He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1993. He lives in Sisters, Oregon and is currently a color analyst for NFL games on CBS television and Westwood One radio. Dan is the son of Bay Area Radio Hall of Famer Bob Fouts.

Fred Dean (Australian footballer)

Fred Dean (14 April 1909 – 16 May 1989) was an Australian rules footballer who played with North Melbourne in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

Fred Dean (offensive lineman)

Frederick Gregory Dean (born March 30, 1955) is a former American football guard from 1978 to 1982 for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL). He later played with the Tampa Bay Bandits of the United States Football League. Dean played college football at Texas Southern University.

Dean is a former member of the football coaching staff at Howard University. He also worked with Howard University's Office of Residence Life as a Community Director until his retirement after over 20 years of service.

Frederick Dean

Frederick or Fred Dean may refer to:

Frederick Dean (rugby union) (1880–1946), Cornish rugby union player

Frederick Dean (SA Navy) (1900–1983), South African military commander

Fred Dean (born 1952), American football defensive end

Fred Dean (offensive lineman) (born 1955), American football guard

Fred Dean (Australian footballer) (1909–1989), Australian rules footballer

Frederick James Dean (1868-1941), British trade unionist

History of the San Diego Chargers

The professional American football team now known as the Los Angeles Chargers previously played in San Diego, California as the San Diego Chargers from 1961 to 2017 before relocating back to Los Angeles where the team played their inaugural 1960. The Chargers franchise relocated from Los Angeles to San Diego in 1961. The Chargers' first home game in San Diego was at Balboa Stadium against the Oakland Raiders on September 17, 1961. Their last game as a San Diego-based club was played at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego on January 1, 2017 against the Kansas City Chiefs, who defeated the host Chargers, 30–13.

Jerry Smith (American football coach)

Jerome Anthony Smith (September 9, 1930 – August 6, 2011) was an American football player and coach. Jerry was born in Dayton, Ohio and attended Chaminade High School, graduating in 1948. At Chaminade he played tight end and later in 1982 was elected to the school's Athletic Hall of Fame.After Smith's college football career, which he spent at Wisconsin, the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL) selected Smith in the 1952 NFL Draft. He played at left guard for the team in 1952 and 1953. In 1956, he split time between the 49ers and Green Bay Packers. Smith played in 29 games during his NFL career.Beginning in 1960, he joined the Boston Patriots as a coach of the team's defensive linemen and linebackers. Two years later, he took a similar role with the Buffalo Bills; in his six years as a Bills coach, the team won two American Football League championships. In 1968, the Cleveland Browns hired Smith as an assistant personnel director. From 1969 to 1970, Smith coached in the New Orleans Saints organization. The following year, he became the Denver Broncos' offensive line coach. On November 17, 1971, Broncos head coach Lou Saban, who had also been Smith's boss in Boston and Buffalo, resigned and Smith was named his replacement for the season's last five games. The Broncos posted a 2–3 record under Smith. Following the 1971 season, he became the Houston Oilers' defensive line coach for 1972; after one season, he returned to the Browns and served multiple roles. He coached the San Diego Chargers' defensive line from 1977 through 1983. He received credit for developing the front four of Fred Dean, Leroy Jones, Louie Kelcher, and Gary "Big Hands" Johnson. Known as the Bruise Brothers, the group helped the Chargers lead the NFL in 1980 with 60 sacks. Dean, Kelcher, and Johnson all started in the 1981 Pro Bowl.

Ken Dean (Australian footballer)

Ken Dean (born 10 August 1938) is a former Australian rules footballer who played with North Melbourne in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

Dean was a defender, seen mostly in a back pocket, but started out as a half-forward. He came to the club from North Colts, as a 17-year-old in 1956. Many of his early appearances were made beside his brother Norm. Their father, Fred Dean, had also played for North Melbourne.

He left to coach Victoria Football Association club Sunshine in 1968.

List of San Francisco 49ers head coaches

There have been 19 head coaches in the history of the San Francisco 49ers professional football franchise. The San Francisco 49ers franchise was formed in 1946 as a charter member of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) before joining the National Football League (NFL) in 1950 after the AAFC merger with the NFL. Buck Shaw became the first head coach of the 49ers in 1946, serving for nine seasons—four in the AAFC and five in the NFL. He coached a number of future College and Pro Football Hall of Famers, such as Frankie Albert, Joe Perry, Leo Nomellini, Y. A. Tittle, Bob St. Clair and Hugh McElhenny.In terms of tenure, Bill Walsh has coached more games (152) and more complete seasons (10) than any other head coach in 49ers franchise history. He led the 49ers to playoff appearances in seven seasons, three of which led to the Super Bowl championship, in 1981, 1984 and 1988. Jerry Rice, Joe Montana, Charles Haley, Ronnie Lott, Johnny Davis, Roger Craig, Fred Dean and Steve Young are among the players Walsh has coached in his career.Four 49ers coaches—Dick Nolan, Bill Walsh, George Seifert, and Jim Harbaugh—have been named coach of the year by at least one major news organization. Walsh, Jack Christiansen and Mike Singletary are the only 49ers coaches currently in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Walsh was selected for his coaching contributions. Singletary and Christiansen were voted into the Hall of Fame primarily for their defensive play. Four times in 49ers history has there been an "interim" head coach. Three games into the 1963 season, coach Red Hickey resigned and was replaced by Jack Christiansen. Christiansen coached the 49ers to a 2–9 record in the remainder of the season and came back to coach the team for four more years. In 1978, Pete McCulley was fired after coaching the 49ers to a 1–8 record. He was replaced by offensive coordinator Fred O'Connor, who was himself fired after leading the 49ers to one win in their final seven games. After a 2–5 start to the 2008 season, Mike Nolan was fired and replaced by Mike Singletary, who finished the season 5–4 and became the official head coach following that season. After a 5–10 start to the 2010 season, Mike Singletary was fired and replaced by Jim Tomsula for the final 49ers game of the 2010 season. Stanford University head coach Jim Harbaugh succeeded Tomsula as head coach in January 2011, and led the franchise to the NFC Championship Game, where the 49ers lost in overtime to the New York Giants. The following season, the 49ers reached Super Bowl XLVII, where they faced off against the Baltimore Ravens, coached by Jim's older brother John Harbaugh. The 49ers trailed by as many as 22 points during the game, but ultimately lost 34–31 to the Ravens; the 49ers losing a Super Bowl for the first time.

Los Angeles Chargers

The Los Angeles Chargers are a professional American football team based in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Chargers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) West division. The team was founded on August 14, 1959, and began play on September 10, 1960, as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL), and spent its first season in Los Angeles, before moving to San Diego in 1961 to become the San Diego Chargers. The Chargers joined the NFL as result of the AFL–NFL merger in 1970, and played their home games at SDCCU Stadium. The return of the Chargers to Los Angeles was announced for the 2017 season, just one year after the Rams had moved back to the city from St. Louis. The Chargers will play their home games at Dignity Health Sports Park until the 2020 opening of the Los Angeles Stadium at Hollywood Park, which they will share with the Rams.

The Chargers won one AFL title in 1963 and reached the AFL playoffs five times and the AFL Championship four times before joining the NFL (1970) as part of the AFL–NFL merger. In the 43 years since then, the Chargers have made 13 trips to the playoffs and four appearances in the AFC Championship game. In 1994, the Chargers won their lone AFC championship and faced the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XXIX, losing 49–26. The Chargers have eight players and one coach enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio: wide receiver Lance Alworth (1962–1970), defensive end Fred Dean (1975–1981), quarterback Dan Fouts (1973–1987), head coach–general manager Sid Gillman (1960–1969, 1971), wide receiver Charlie Joiner (1976–1986), offensive lineman Ron Mix (1960–1969), tight end Kellen Winslow (1979–1987), linebacker Junior Seau (1990–2002), and running back LaDainian Tomlinson (2001–2009).

Scott Myers

Scott Myers (born 1958, USA) is an American painter and sculptor who lives and works in Texas. He graduated Texas A&M University in 1984 with a doctorate in veterinary medicine. He studied sculpture throughout Italy focusing on Florence, Venice and Rome. Sculpting in Tuscany, he cast his work in bronze at the prestigious Fonderia d'Arte Massimo Del Chiaro in Pietrasanta. In 1994, Myers became an elected member of the National Sculpture Society. On February 12, 2011, Myers was featured in the popular television show Texas Country Reporter. Myers was inducted in the inaugural class of the Haltom City High School Hall of Fame on March 10, 2011.Myers is best known for sculpting busts for the Pro Football Hall of Fame, including Chris Doleman, Chris Hanburger, Rickey Jackson, Russ Grimm, Bob Hayes, Randall McDaniel, Fred Dean, Emmitt Thomas, Bruce Matthews, Rayfield Wright, Elvin Bethea, Curley Culp, Claude Humphrey, Charles Haley and Kevin Greene.Myers' paintings focus mostly on ranch life and western landscapes, with horses and cowboys figuring prominently in his subject matter. His paintings combine bold color with a Monet-like layering of color and texture that makes him unique in the western art genre.

The Hogs (American football)

The Hogs were the offensive line of the Washington Redskins of the National Football League during the 1980s and early 1990s. Renowned for their ability to control the line of scrimmage, the Hogs helped the Redskins win three Super Bowl championships (XVII, XXII and XXVI) under head coach Joe Gibbs.

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