Fred Beebe

Frederick Leonard Beebe (December 31, 1879 – October 30, 1957) was a professional baseball player. He played for the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds, Philadelphia Phillies and Cleveland Indians.

Fred Beebe
Fred-beebe
Pitcher
Born: December 31, 1879
Lincoln, Nebraska
Died: October 30, 1957 (aged 77)
Elgin, Illinois
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 17, 1906, for the Chicago Cubs
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1916, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Win–loss record62–83
Earned run average2.86
Strikeouts634
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Biography

Beebe played baseball for the Hyde Park High School in Chicago and the University of Illinois.[1]

Beebe made his professional debut on April 17, 1906, and played Major League Baseball from 1906 to 1916.[2] In his rookie year, Beebe led the Major Leagues with 171 strikeouts. His career record was 62–83.

After leaving the league, he served as the head coach of the Indiana Hoosiers college baseball team.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Fred Beebe Stats". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved October 30, 2012.
  2. ^ "MLB Player Fred Beebe – Fred Beebe Bio". SportsPool.com. Retrieved October 30, 2012.
  3. ^ "2011 indiana baseball history & records" (PDF). IndianaHoosiers. Retrieved October 30, 2012.

External links

1879 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1879 throughout the world.

1906 Chicago Cubs season

The 1906 Chicago Cubs season was the 35th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 31st in the National League and the 14th at West Side Park. The team won the National League pennant with a record of 116–36, a full 20 games ahead of the second-place New York Giants. The team's .763 winning percentage, with two ties in their 154-game season, is the highest in modern MLB history. The 2001 Seattle Mariners also won 116 games, but they did that in 162 games with a .716 winning percentage.

In a major upset, the Cubs were beaten by the Chicago White Sox in the 1906 World Series.

1906 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1906 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 25th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 15th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 52–98 during the season and finished 7th in the National League.

1906 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1906 throughout the world.

1907 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1907 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 26th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 16th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 52–101 during the season and finished eighth and last in the eight-team National League.

1908 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1908 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 27th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 17th season in the National League. The Cardinals had a 49–105 win-loss record during the season and finished 8th (last) in the National League. The season's attendance of 185,377, an average of less than 2,500 a game, which remains the lowest peacetime attendance level since 1901. The Cardinals set a Major League record which stills stands for the fewest base on balls by a team in a season, with 282. Additionally, they hold the MLB record for fewest runs scored in a season with 372, only 2.42 runs per contest.

1909 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1909 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 28th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 18th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 54–98 during the season and finished 7th in the National League.

1910 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1910 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The Reds finished 5th in the National League with a record of 75–79.

1911 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1911 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 70–83, 29 games behind the New York Giants.

1911 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1911 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished fourth in the National League with a record of 79 wins and 73 losses.

1916 Cleveland Indians season

The 1916 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 77–77, 14 games behind the Boston Red Sox.

1957 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1957 throughout the world.

December 31

December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. It is known by a collection of names including: Saint Sylvester's Day, New Year's Eve or Old Years Day/Night, as the following day is New Year's Day. It is the last day of the year. The following day is January 1 of the following year.

Hyde Park Academy High School

Hyde Park Academy High School (formerly known as Hyde Park High School and Hyde Park Career Academy) is a public 4–year high school located in the Woodlawn neighborhood on the south side of Chicago, Illinois, United States. Opened in 1863, Hyde Park is located in the Woodlawn neighborhood south of the University of Chicago. Hyde Park is operated by the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) district. In 2012, Hyde Park became the fourth Chicago public high school to become an International Baccalaureate school.

Jack Taylor (1900s pitcher)

John W. Taylor (January 14, 1874 – March 4, 1938) was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals.

List of people from Lincoln, Nebraska

This is a list of people from Lincoln, Nebraska.

Rebel Oakes

Ennis Telfair "Rebel" Oakes (December 17, 1883 – February 29, 1948) was an American Major League Baseball player.

Oakes was born in Lisbon, Louisiana. After attending Louisiana Industrial Institute, which is now Louisiana Tech University, Rebel turned his attention to playing professional baseball, eventually reaching the Majors when he was traded to the Cincinnati Reds in 1909. The following year, he was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals along with future Hall of Fame manager Miller Huggins for Fred Beebe. He played for the Cardinals for four seasons as a starting center fielder, then jumped to the Federal League when it was established in 1914. After two seasons as the player-manager for the Pittsburgh Rebels, named in Oakes' honor, the league folded and Rebel never returned to Major League Baseball.After his Major League baseball career, Oakes moved on to play and manage for the Denver Bears of the Western League in 1916, where his team finished fourth and he led the league in hits with 205. He died at the age of 64 in Lisbon, Louisiana, and is interred at Rocky Springs Cemetery in Lisbon.

Sammy Ellis

Samuel Joseph Ellis (February 11, 1941 – May 13, 2016) was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cincinnati Reds, California Angels, and Chicago White Sox. Ellis was an MLB All-Star in 1965.

Tom Parrott

Thomas William Parrott (April 10, 1868 – January 1, 1932), nicknamed "Tacky Tom", was a professional baseball player. He was a right-handed pitcher over parts of four seasons (1893–1896) with the Chicago Colts, Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Browns. For his career, he compiled a 39–48 record in 115 appearances, with a 5.33 earned run average and 166 strikeouts.

Parrott was born in Portland, Oregon, in 1868, and died in Dundee, Oregon, at the age of 63. He grew up outside of Sherwood, Oregon. His brother, Walter "Jiggs" Parrott, also played Major League Baseball.

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