Franz von Hatzfeld

Franz von Hatzfeld (13 September 1596 – 30 July 1642) was the Prince-Bishop of Würzburg from 1631 to 1642 and the Prince-Bishop of Bamberg from 1633 to 1642.

Franz von Hatzfeld was born in Crottorf, near Friesenhagen, on 13 September 1596, the third son of Freiherr Sebastian von Hatzfeld-Wildenburg (1566-1631) and his wife Lucia von Sickingen (1569–1605), a granddaughter of Franz von Sickingen.[1] His elder brother was Melchior von Hatzfeldt, Imperial field marshal. His father had been raised a Protestant, but converted to Roman Catholicism.[1]

In 1615, he became a canon of Würzburg Cathedral and, two years later, of Bamberg Cathedral.[1] At age thirty, he became head cantor of Bamberg Cathedral, and the next year, became diocesan administrator of Würzburg.[1] He then served as provost of the Gangolfskirche in Bamberg.[1]

The cathedral chapter of Würzburg Cathedral elected him Prince-Bishop of Würzburg on 7 August 1631, with Pope Urban VIII confirming his appointment on 3 January 1632.[2]

With the Thirty Years' War raging, Swedish troops occupied the Prince-Bishopric of Bamberg and Franz von Hatzfeld fled to Cologne as a protective measure.[1] On 20 June 1633 Lord High Chancellor of Sweden Axel Oxenstierna declared that the Prince-Bishopric of Bamberg and the Prince-Bishopric of Würzburg would henceforth be combined as the "Duchy of Franconia" and enfeoffed to Bernard of Saxe-Weimar.[1]

On 4 August 1633 the cathedral chapter of Bamberg Cathedral (which had escaped to the Duchy of Carinthia) elected Franz von Hatzfeld Prince-Bishop of Bamberg, with Pope Urban VIII confirming this appointment on 31 October 1633.[2] This created a personal union between the Prince-Bishopric of Würzburg and the Prince-Bishopric of Bamberg.

Following the Battle of Nördlingen of 5–6 September 1634, Franz von Hatzfeld ended his Cologne exile, returning to Würzburg in November 1634, accompanied by the troops of Philipp von Mansfeld.[1]

He died of a stroke in Würzburg on 30 July 1642.[1]

Franz von Hatzfeld
Engraving of Franz von Hatzfeld by Johann Salver.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Article on German Wikipedia
  2. ^ a b Profile on catholic-hierarchy.org
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Philipp Adolf von Ehrenberg
Prince-Bishop of Würzburg
1631–1642
Succeeded by
Johann Philipp von Schönborn
Preceded by
Johann Georg Fuchs von Dornheim
Prince-Bishop of Bamberg
1633–1642
Succeeded by
Melchior Otto von Voit von Salzburg
1596

1596 (MDXCVI)

was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1596th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 596th year of the 2nd millennium, the 96th year of the 16th century, and the 7th year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1596, the Gregorian calendar was

10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1642

1642 (MDCXLII)

was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1642nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 642nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 42nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1642, the Gregorian calendar was

10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Bishopric of Würzburg

The Prince-Bishopric of Würzburg (German: Fürstbistum Würzburg; Hochstift Würzburg) was an ecclesiastical principality of the Holy Roman Empire located in Lower Franconia west of the Prince-Bishopric of Bamberg. Würzburg had been a diocese since 743. As definitely established by the Concordat of 1448, bishops in Germany were chosen by the canons of the cathedral chapter and their election was later confirmed by the pope. Following a common practice in Germany, the prince-bishops of Würzburg were frequently elected to other ecclesiastical principalities as well. The last few prince-bishops resided at the Würzburg Residence, which is one of the grandest baroque palaces in Europe.

As a consequence of the 1801 Treaty of Lunéville, Würzburg, along with the other ecclesiastical states of Germany, was secularized in 1803 and absorbed into the Electorate of Bavaria. In the same year Ferdinand III, former Grand Duke of Tuscany, was compensated with the Electorate of Salzburg. In the 1805 Peace of Pressburg, Ferdinand lost Salzburg to the Austrian Empire, but was compensated with the new Grand Duchy of Würzburg, Bavaria having relinquished the territory in return for the Tyrol. This new state lasted until 1814, when it was once again annexed by Bavaria.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Würzburg was reestablished in 1821 without temporal power.

House of Hatzfeld

Hatzfeld, also spelled Hatzfeldt, is a German noble family.

Johann Georg Fuchs von Dornheim

Johann Georg Fuchs von Dornheim (1586–1633) was the Prince-Bishop of Bamberg from 1623 to 1633. He was known as the "Hexenbrenner" (witch burner) and the "Hexenbischof" (witch-bishop) for presiding over the most intensive period of witch trials in early modern Bamberg.

Johann Philipp von Schönborn

Johann Philipp von Schönborn (6 August 1605 – 12 February 1673) was the Archbishop-Elector of Mainz (1647–1673), the Bishop of Würzburg (1642–1673), and the Bishop of Worms (1663–1673).

Marienberg Fortress

Marienberg Fortress (German: Festung Marienberg) is a prominent landmark on the left bank of the Main river in Würzburg, in the Franconia region of Bavaria, Germany. The mighty Fortress Marienberg is a symbol of Würzburg and served as a home of the local prince-bishops for nearly five centuries. It has been a fort since ancient times. Most of the current structures originally were built in Renaissance and Baroque styles between the 16th and 18th centuries. After Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden conquered the area in 1631 during the Thirty Years' War, the castle was reconstructed as a Baroque residence. After it ceased to serve as residence of the Bishops of Würzburg, the fortress saw repeated action in the wars of the late 18th and 19th centuries. Festung Marienberg was severely damaged by British bombs in March 1945 and only fully rebuilt in 1990. Today, it houses two museums.

Melchior Otto Voit von Salzburg

Melchior Otto Voit von Salzburg (1603–1653) was the Prince-Bishop of Bamberg from 1642 to 1653.

Philipp Adolf von Ehrenberg

Philipp Adolf von Ehrenberg (1583–1631) was the Prince-Bishop of Würzburg from 1622 to 1631.

Philipp Adolf von Ehrenberg was born in Heinsheim, which is today a district of Bad Rappenau, on September 23, 1583, the son of Johann Heinrich von Ehrenberg (d. 1584). His mother was the sister of Julius Echter von Mespelbrunn, who was the Prince-Bishop of Würzburg from 1573 to 1617 and led the massive witch-hunt of Wurzburg alongside his son.The cathedral chapter of Würzburg Cathedral elected him to be Prince-Bishop of Würzburg on February 6, 1623, with Pope Urban VIII confirming his appointment on March 19, 1624.As bishop, von Ehrenberg was a fierce supporter of the Counter-Reformation and supported re-Catholicization throughout his territories. He also oversaw the Würzburg witch trials, a massive witch-hunt in his bishopric from 1626 to 1630, during which time some 900 alleged witches were burned at the stake.He died on July 16, 1631.

Prince-Bishopric of Bamberg

The Prince-Bishopric of Bamberg (German: Hochstift Bamberg) was an ecclesiastical State of the Holy Roman Empire. It goes back to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Bamberg established at the 1007 synod in Frankfurt, at the behest of King Henry II to further expand the spread of Christianity in the Franconian lands. The bishops obtained the status of Imperial immediacy about 1245 and ruled their estates as Prince-bishops until they were subsumed to the Electorate of Bavaria in the course of the German Mediatisation in 1802.

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