Franklin Medal

The Franklin Medal was a science award presented from 1915 through 1997 by the Franklin Institute located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. It was founded in 1914 by Samuel Insull.

The Franklin Medal was the most prestigious of the various awards presented by the Franklin Institute.[1] Together with other historical awards, it was merged into the Benjamin Franklin Medal, initiated in 1998.[2]

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The Franklin Medal, "founded in 1914 by Samuel Insull … awarded by the Franklin Institute for signal and eminent service in science"
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Presentation of the first Franklin Medal in Philadelphia on May 19, 1915. Front row: Samuel Insull, Walton Clark, recipient Thomas Edison and his wife Mina Miller, Chevalier Van Rappard, accepting the award for Heike Kamerlingh Onnes. Back row: Robert Bowie Owens, John J. Carty, Frank J. Sprague, William Stanley, R. Tait McKenzie.

Laureates

Recipients are listed in a database on The Franklin Institute website.[2]

Year Recipient Discipline Notes
1915 Thomas Edison Engineering [3]
1915 Heike Kamerlingh Onnes Physics
1916 John J. Carty Engineering
1916 Theodore William Richards Chemistry
1917 Hendrik Lorentz Physics
1917 David W. Taylor Engineering
1918 Guglielmo Marconi Engineering
1918 Thomas Corwin Mendenhall Physics
1919 James Dewar Physics
1919 George Owen Squier Engineering
1920 Svante Arrhenius Chemistry
1920 Charles Algernon Parsons Engineering
1921 Charles Fabry Physics
1921 Frank J. Sprague Engineering
1921 Ralph Modjeski Engineering
1922 J. J. Thomson Physics
1923 Gustave-Auguste Ferrié Engineering/Computer and Cognitive Science [4]
1923 Albert A. Michelson Physics
1924 Ernest Rutherford Chemistry
1924 Edward Weston Engineering
1925 Elihu Thomson Engineering
1925 Pieter Zeeman Physics
1926 Niels Bohr Physics
1926 Samuel Rea Engineering
1927 George Ellery Hale Physics
1927 Max Planck Physics
1928 Charles F. Brush Engineering
1928 Walther Nernst Chemistry
1929 Emile Berliner Engineering
1929 Charles Thomson Rees Wilson Physics
1930 William Henry Bragg Physics
1930 John Frank Stevens Engineering
1931 James Hopwood Jeans Physics
1931 Willis R. Whitney Engineering
1932 Philipp Lenard Physics
1932 Ambrose Swasey Engineering
1933 Paul Sabatier Chemistry
1933 Orville Wright Engineering
1934 Irving Langmuir Chemistry
1934 Henry Norris Russell Physics
1935 Albert Einstein Physics
1935 John Ambrose Fleming Engineering
1936 Frank B. Jewett Engineering
1936 Charles F. Kettering Engineering
1937 Peter Debye Chemistry
1937 Robert Andrews Millikan Physics
1938 William F. Durand Engineering
1938 Charles A. Kraus Chemistry
1939 Edwin Hubble Physics
1939 Albert Sauveur Engineering
1940 Leo Baekeland Engineering
1940 Arthur Compton Physics
1941 Edwin H. Armstrong Engineering
1941 C. V. Raman Physics [5]
1942 Jerome Clarke Hunsaker Engineering
1942 Paul Dyer Merica Engineering [6]
1943 G. W. Pierce Engineering
1943 Harold Urey Physics
1944 William D. Coolidge Engineering
1944 Peter Kapitza Physics
1945 Harlow Shapley Physics
1946 Henry Clapp Sherman Life Science [7]
1946 Henry Tizard Engineering [8]
1946 Enrico Fermi Physics [9]
1947 Robert Robinson Chemistry [10]
1948 Wendell Meredith Stanley Life Science [11]
1948 Theodore von Kármán Engineering [12]
1949 Theodor Svedberg Life Science [13]
1950 Eugene Wigner Physics [14]
1951 James Chadwick Physics [15]
1952 Wolfgang Pauli Physics [16]
1953 William Francis Gibbs Engineering [17]
1954 Kenneth Mees Engineering [18]
1955 Arne Tiselius Life Science [19]
1956 Frank Whittle Engineering [20]
1957 Hugh Stott Taylor Chemistry [21]
1958 Donald Wills Douglas Engineering [22]
1959 Hans Bethe Physics [23]
1960 Roger Adams Engineering [24]
1961 Detlev Bronk Life Science [25]
1962 G. I. Taylor Life Science [26]
1963 Glenn T. Seaborg Physics [27]
1964 Gregory Breit Physics [28]
1965 Frederick Seitz Engineering [29]
1966 Britton Chance Life Science [30]
1967 Murray Gell-Mann Physics [31]
1968 Marshall Warren Nirenberg Life Science [32]
1969 John Archibald Wheeler Physics [33]
1970 Wolfgang K. H. Panofsky Physics [34]
1971 Hannes Alfvén Physics [35]
1972 George Kistiakowsky Chemistry [36]
1973 Theodosius Dobzhansky Life Science [37]
1974 Nikolay Bogolyubov Physics [38]
1975 John Bardeen Physics [39]
1976 Mahlon Hoagland Life Science [40]
1977 Cyril M. Harris Engineering [41]
1978 Elias James Corey Chemistry [42]
1979 G. Evelyn Hutchinson Life Science [43]
1980 Avram Goldstein Life Science [44]
1980 Lyman Spitzer Physics [45]
1981 Stephen Hawking Physics [46]
1982 César Milstein Life Science [47]
1982 Kenneth G. Wilson Physics [48]
1984 Verner E. Suomi Engineering [49]
1985 George C. Pimentel Physics [50]
1986 Benoît Mandelbrot Physics [51]
1987 Stanley Cohen Life Science [52]
1988 Donald Knuth Computer and Cognitive Science [53]
1990 Hugh Huxley Life Science [54]
1990 David Turnbull Physics [55]
1992 Frederick Reines Physics [56]
1995 Gerard 't Hooft Physics [57]
1996 Richard Smalley Chemistry [58]
1997 Mario Capecchi Life Science [59]

References

  1. ^ Flam, Faye (April 29, 1996). "Five to Get Franklin Institute Honors". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 2015-05-08.
  2. ^ a b "Laureates Search". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2015-05-08.
  3. ^ "Thomas Alva Edison". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  4. ^ "Auguste G. Ferrie". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  5. ^ "Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  6. ^ "Paul Dyer Merica". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  7. ^ "Henry Clapp Sherman". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  8. ^ "Henry Thomas Tizard". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  9. ^ "Enrico Fermi". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  10. ^ "Robert Robinson". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  11. ^ "Wendell Meredith Stanley". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  12. ^ "Theodor Von Karman". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  13. ^ "The Svedberg". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  14. ^ "Eugene P. Wigner". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  15. ^ "James Chadwick". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  16. ^ "Wolfgang Pauli". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  17. ^ "William Francis Gibbs". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  18. ^ "Charles Edward Kenneth Mees". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  19. ^ "Arne Tiselius". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  20. ^ "Frank Whittle". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  21. ^ "Hugh Stott Taylor". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  22. ^ "Donald Wills Douglas". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  23. ^ "Hans Albrecht Bethe". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  24. ^ "Roger Adams". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  25. ^ "Detlev W. Bronk". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  26. ^ "Geoffrey Ingram Taylor". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  27. ^ "Glenn T. Seaborg". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  28. ^ "Gregory Breit". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  29. ^ "Frederick Seitz". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  30. ^ "Britton Chance". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  31. ^ "Murray Gell-Mann". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  32. ^ "Marshall Warren Nirenberg". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  33. ^ "John Archibald Wheeler". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  34. ^ "Wolfgang K. H. Panofsky". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  35. ^ "Hannes Alfven". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  36. ^ "George Kistiakowsky". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  37. ^ "Theodosius Grigorevich Dobzhansky". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  38. ^ "Nikolai Nikolaevich Bogoliubov". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  39. ^ "John Bardeen". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  40. ^ "Mahlon B. Hoagland". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  41. ^ "Cyril Manton Harris". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  42. ^ "Elias J. Corey". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  43. ^ "G. Evelyn Hutchinson". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  44. ^ "Avram Goldstein". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  45. ^ "Lyman Spitzer Jr". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  46. ^ "Stephen W. Hawking". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  47. ^ "Cesar Milstein". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  48. ^ "Kenneth Geddes Wilson". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  49. ^ "Verner E. Suomi". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  50. ^ "George Claude Pimentel". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  51. ^ "Benoît Mandelbrot". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  52. ^ "Stanley Cohen". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  53. ^ "Donald Ervin Knuth". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  54. ^ "Hugh E. Huxley". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  55. ^ "David Turnbull". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  56. ^ "Frederick Reines". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  57. ^ "Gerard 't Hooft". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  58. ^ "Richard E. Smalley". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.
  59. ^ "Mario Renato Capecchi". The Franklin Institute Awards. Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2016-01-30.

External links

Antoine Émile Henry Labeyrie

Antoine Émile Henry Labeyrie (born 12 May 1943) is a French astronomer, who held the Observational astrophysics chair at the Collège de France between 1991 and 2014, where he is currently professor emeritus. He is working with the Hypertelescope Lise association, which aims to develop an extremely large astronomical interferometer with spherical geometry that might theoretically show features on Earth-like worlds around other suns, as its president. He is a member of the French Academy of Sciences in the Sciences of the Universe (sciences de l'univers) section. Between 1995 and 1999 he was director of the Haute-Provence Observatory.

Labeyrie graduated from the "grande école" SupOptique (École supérieure d'optique). He invented speckle interferometry, and works with astronomical interferometers. Labeyrie concentrated particularly on the use of "diluted optics" beam combination or "densified pupils" of a similar type but larger scale than those Michelson used for measuring the diameters of stars in the 1920s, in contrast to other astronomical interferometer researchers who generally switched to pupil-plane beam combination in the 1980s and 1990s.

The main-belt asteroid 8788 Labeyrie (1978 VP2) is named in honor of Antoine Émile Henry Labeyrie and Catherine Labeyrie. In 2000, he was awarded The Benjamin Franklin Medal.

Aravind Joshi

Aravind Krishna Joshi (August 5, 1929 – December 31, 2017) was the Henry Salvatori Professor of Computer and Cognitive Science in the computer science department of the University of Pennsylvania. Joshi defined the tree-adjoining grammar formalism which is often used in computational linguistics and natural language processing.

Joshi studied at Pune University and the Indian Institute of Science, where he was awarded a BE in electrical engineering and a DIISc in communication engineering respectively. Joshi's graduate work was done in the electrical engineering department at the University of Pennsylvania, and he was awarded his PhD in 1960. He became a professor at Penn and was the co-founder and co-director of the Institute for Research in Cognitive Science.

Benjamin Franklin Medal

Benjamin Franklin Medal may refer to:

Benjamin Franklin Medal (American Philosophical Society)

Benjamin Franklin Medal (Franklin Institute)

Benjamin Franklin Medal (Royal Society of Arts)

Benjamin Franklin Award (Bioinformatics)

Benjamin Franklin Medal (American Philosophical Society)

The Benjamin Franklin Medal presented by the American Philosophical Society located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., also called Benjamin Franklin Bicentennial Medal, is awarded since 1906. The originally called "Philosophical Society" was founded in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin. The award was created to remember the 200th anniversary of the birthday of Franklin. The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston has this medal in his collection.The medal was created by the brothers Augustus and Louis St. Gaudens.

Benjamin Franklin Medal (Royal Society of Arts)

The Royal Society of Arts Benjamin Franklin Medal was instituted in 1956 to commemorate the 250th anniversary of Benjamin Franklin's birth and the 200th anniversary of his membership to the Royal Society of Arts.

The medal is conferred by the RSA on individuals, groups, and organisations who have made profound efforts to forward Anglo-American understanding in areas closely linked to the RSA's agenda. It is also awarded to recognise those that have made a significant contribution to global affairs through co-operation and collaboration between the United States and the United Kingdom.

The medal is awarded annually, alternately to citizens of the United States and the United Kingdom.

Carlos P. Romulo

Carlos Peña Romulo, (14 January 1898 – 15 December 1985) was a Filipino diplomat, statesman, soldier, journalist and author. He was a reporter at 16, a newspaper editor by the age of 20, and a publisher at 32. He was a co-founder of the Boy Scouts of the Philippines, a general in the US Army and the Philippine Army, university president, President of the UN General Assembly, was eventually named one of the Philippines' National Artists in Literature, and was the recipient of many other honors and honorary degrees. His hometown is Camiling, Tarlac and he studied at the Camiling Central Elementary School during his basic education.

Daniel Kleppner

Daniel Kleppner, born 1932, is the Lester Wolfe Professor Emeritus of Physics at MIT and co-director of the MIT-Harvard Center for Ultracold Atoms. His areas of science include Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, and his research interests include Experimental Atomic Physics, Laser Spectroscopy, and High Precision Measurements. He is the winner of the 2005 Wolf Prize in Physics, the 2007 Frederic Ives Medal, and the 2014 Benjamin Franklin Medal. Prof. Kleppner has also been awarded the National Medal of Science (2006). Together with Robert J. Kolenkow, he authored a popular introductory mechanics textbook for advanced students. Kleppner graduated from Williams College with a B.A. in 1953, Cambridge University with a B.A. in 1955, and Harvard University with a Ph.D. in 1959.

Donald Wills Douglas Sr.

Donald Wills Douglas Sr. (April 6, 1892 – February 1, 1981) was an American aircraft industrialist and engineer.

An aviation pioneer, he designed and built the Douglas Cloudster. Though it failed in its intended purpose—being the first to fly non-stop across the United States—it became the first airplane with a payload greater than its own weight.He founded the Douglas Aircraft Company in 1921 (the company later merged with McDonnell Aircraft to form McDonnell Douglas Corporation). Under his leadership, the company became one of the leaders of the commercial aircraft industry, engaging in a decades-long struggle for supremacy with arch-rival William Boeing and the company he founded, Boeing. Douglas gained the upper hand, particularly with his revolutionary and highly successful Douglas DC-3 airliner and its equally popular World War II military transport version, the C-47; at the start of the war, his airplanes made up 80% of all commercial aircraft in service. However, he lagged behind in the jet age and was overtaken and surpassed by Boeing. He retired in 1957.

Franklin Institute

The Franklin Institute is a science museum and the center of science education and research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is named after the American scientist and statesman, Benjamin Franklin, and houses the Benjamin Franklin National Memorial. Founded in 1824, the Franklin Institute is one of the oldest centers of science education and development in the United States.

Franklin Institute Awards

The Franklin Institute Awards (or Benjamin Franklin Medal) is a science and engineering award presented since 1824 by the Franklin Institute, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US. The Franklin Institute Awards comprises the Benjamin Franklin Medals in seven areas of science and engineering, the Bower Awards and Prize for Achievement in Science, and the Bower Award for Business Leadership.

Frederick Chapman Robbins

Frederick Chapman Robbins (August 25, 1916 – August 4, 2003) was an American pediatrician and virologist. He was born in Auburn, Alabama, and grew up in Columbia, Missouri, attending David H. Hickman High School.

He received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1954 along with John Franklin Enders and Thomas Huckle Weller, making Robbins the only Nobel laureate born in Alabama. The award was for breakthrough work in isolating and growing the polio virus in tissue culture, paving the way for vaccines developed by Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin. He attended school at the University of Missouri and Harvard University.

In 1952, he was appointed professor of pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University. Robbins was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1962. From 1966 to 1980, Robbins was dean of the School of Medicine at Case Western. In 1980, he assumed the presidency of the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine. Five years later, in 1985, Robbins returned to Case Western Reserve as dean emeritus and distinguished university professor emeritus. He continued to be a fixture at the medical school until his death in 2003. The medical school's "Frederick C. Robbins Society" is named in his honor.

Robbins received the Benjamin Franklin Medal for Distinguished Achievement in the Sciences of the American Philosophical Society in 1999.

Jane Goodall

Dame Jane Morris Goodall (; born Valerie Jane Morris-Goodall, 3 April 1934), formerly Baroness Jane van Lawick-Goodall, is an English primatologist and anthropologist. Considered to be the world's foremost expert on chimpanzees, Goodall is best known for her over 55-year study of social and family interactions of wild chimpanzees since she first went to Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania in 1960. She is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and the Roots & Shoots programme, and she has worked extensively on conservation and animal welfare issues. She has served on the board of the Nonhuman Rights Project since its founding in 1996. In April 2002, she was named a UN Messenger of Peace. Dr. Goodall is also honorary member of the World Future Council.

Jillian Banfield

Jillian Fiona Banfield (born Armidale, Australia) is Professor at the University of California, Berkeley with appointments in the Earth Science, Ecosystem Science and Materials Science and Engineering departments. She leads the Microbial Research initiative within the Innovative Genomics Institute, is affiliated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and has a position at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Some of her most noted work includes publications on the structure and functioning of microbial communities and the nature, properties and reactivity (especially crystal growth) of nanomaterials.

John Cocke

John Cocke (May 30, 1925 – July 16, 2002) was an American computer scientist recognized for his large contribution to computer architecture and optimizing compiler design. He is considered by many to be "the father of RISC architecture."He attended Duke University, where he received his Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1946 and his Ph.D. in Mathematics in 1956. Cocke spent his entire career as an industrial researcher for IBM, from 1956 to 1992.

Perhaps the project where his innovations were most noted was in the IBM 801 minicomputer, where his realization that matching the design of the architecture's instruction set to the relatively simple instructions actually emitted by compilers could allow high performance at a low cost.

He is one of the inventors of the CYK algorithm (C for Cocke). He was also involved in the pioneering speech recognition and machine translation work at IBM in the 1970s and 1980s, and is credited by Frederick Jelinek with originating the idea of using a trigram language model for speech recognition.Cocke was appointed IBM Fellow in 1972. He won the Eckert-Mauchly Award in 1985, ACM Turing Award in 1987, the National Medal of Technology in 1991 and the National Medal of Science in 1994, IEEE John von Neumann Medal in 1984, The Franklin Institute's Certificate of Merit in 1996, the Seymour Cray Computer Science and Engineering Award in 1999, and The Benjamin Franklin Medal in 2000.

In 2002, he was made a Fellow of the Computer History Museum "for his development and implementation of reduced instruction set computer architecture and program optimization technology."He was born in Charlotte, North Carolina and died in Valhalla, New York.

Marvin Minsky

Marvin Lee Minsky (August 9, 1927 – January 24, 2016) was an American cognitive scientist concerned largely with research of artificial intelligence (AI), co-founder of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's AI laboratory, and author of several texts concerning AI and philosophy.

Ray William Clough

Ray William Clough, (July 23, 1920 – October 8, 2016), was Byron L. and Elvira E. Nishkian Professor of structural engineering in the department of civil engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and one of the founders of the finite element method (FEM). His article in 1956 was one of the first applications of this computational method. He coined the term “finite elements” in an article in 1960. He was born in Seattle.In the Fall, 2008 Clough was recognized as a “Legend of Earthquake Engineering” at the World Conference of Earthquake Engineering in China. Clough is known for his work in the field of earthquake engineering, and credited with the development and application of a mathematical method, finite element analysis, that has revolutionized numerical modeling of the physical world. Dr. Clough extended the method to enable dynamic analysis of complex structures and co-authored the definitive text on structural dynamics. Three decades later, this text is still in wide use. He also transformed the field through the development of fundamental theories, computational techniques, and experimental methods. During his almost 40 years at Berkeley he taught, advised, and mentored numerous students.

Clough is professor emeritus of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He is credited with developing the Earthquake Engineering Research Center at Berkeley, a hub for analytical engineering research, information resources, and public service programs. Dr. Clough’s many honors include the Prince Philip Medal from the Royal Academy of Engineering in London. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Royal Norwegian Scientists Society, and the Chinese Academy of Engineering. He was awarded A. Cemal Eringen Medal in 1992. In 1994, President Clinton presented Clough with a National Medal of Science and in 2006 he received the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Civil Engineering from The Franklin Institute. He died on October 8, 2016, aged 96.

Richard M. Karp

Richard Manning Karp (born January 3, 1935) is an American computer scientist and computational theorist at the University of California, Berkeley. He is most notable for his research in the theory of algorithms, for which he received a Turing Award in 1985, The Benjamin Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science in 2004, and the Kyoto Prize in 2008.

William O. Baker

William Oliver Baker (July 15, 1915 – October 31, 2005) was president of Bell Labs from 1973 to 1979 and advisor on scientific matters to five United States presidents.

Wolfgang K. H. Panofsky

Wolfgang Kurt Hermann "Pief" Panofsky (April 24, 1919 – September 24, 2007), was a German-American physicist who won many awards including the National Medal of Science.

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