Frankie Crosetti

Frank Peter Joseph Crosetti (October 4, 1910 – February 11, 2002) was an American baseball shortstop. Nicknamed "The Crow", he spent his whole seventeen-year Major League Baseball playing career with the New York Yankees before becoming a coach with the franchise for an additional twenty seasons. As a player and third base coach for the Yankees, Crosetti was part of seventeen World Championship teams and 23 World Series participants overall, from 1932 to 1964, the most of any individual.

Frankie Crosetti
Frank Crosetti 1969
Crosetti in 1969
Shortstop
Born: October 4, 1910
San Francisco, California
Died: February 11, 2002 (aged 91)
Stockton, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 12, 1932, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
October 3, 1948, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Batting average.245
Hits1,541
Runs batted in649
Teams
As player

As coach

Career highlights and awards

Early years

Crosetti was born in San Francisco, California, and grew up in North Beach, which was something of a hotbed of Italian-American talent on the baseball field during the 1920s & 1930s (Tony Lazzeri, Charlie Silvera & the three DiMaggio brothers also hail from the same neighborhood).[1] Before joining the Yankees, Crosetti played four seasons with the San Francisco Seals of the Pacific Coast League.

New York Yankees

FrankieCrosettiGoudeycard
A 1933 Goudey baseball card of Crosetti

Crosetti joined the Yankees in 1932, and batted .241 with five home runs and 57 runs batted in at the bottom of the Yankees' batting order. He was part of a World Series Championship his first year in the big leagues as the Yankees completed a four-game sweep of the Chicago Cubs in the 1932 World Series two days shy of Crosetti's 22nd birthday.[2]

The finest year of Crosetti's career came in 1936, when Crosetti batted .288 with fifteen home runs, 78 RBIs and 137 runs scored (all career highs). Batting lead-off, he was named an American League All-Star for the first time in his career,[3] and reached the World Series for the second time. Crosetti batted .269 in the Yankees' six game victory over the New York Giants in the 1936 World Series, and drove in the winning run in the Yankees' 2-1 victory in game three.[4] The 1936 season was the first of a string of four World Series titles for Crosetti and the Yankees.

After a poor 1940 season, he lost his starting shortstop job to Phil Rizzuto in 1941. He reinherited the starting shortstop job when Rizzuto joined the Navy for battle in World War II, however, became a reserve once again when Rizzuto rejoined the club in 1946. Crosetti then became a player/coach for the club through the 1948 season.

Career stats

Games PA AB Runs Hits 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO Avg. Slg. OBP HBP Fld%
1683 7273 6277 1006 1541 260 65 98 649 113 792 799 .245 .354 .341 114 .949

In 29 World Series games, Crosetti batted .174 with one home run, eleven RBIs and sixteen runs scored. His only World Series home run was a two-run shot off Dizzy Dean in game two of the 1938 World Series that gave the Yankees a 4–3 lead over the Cubs.[5] Perhaps Crosetti's second most memorable moment in postseason play occurred in game three of the 1942 World Series when he shoved umpire Bill Summers, an act for which he received a $250 fine from Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis and was suspended the first 30 games of the 1943 season.[6]

He led the AL in plate appearances twice (1938 and 1939), stolen bases once (1938), strikeouts twice (1937 and 1938) and in being hit by pitches eight times (1934, 1936–40, 1942 and 1945). Crosetti was known as the weak link in the Yankees batting order, but he was also known as a slick fielder and for his ability to pull off the hidden ball trick.[7] He earned eight World Series rings as a player, and was a two-time All-Star (1936 and 1939).

Coaching career

Crosetti became third base coach with the Yankees in 1946 and was part of an additional nine World Series championships as a coach with the franchise once he retired as a player after the 1948 season. He was said to be the "perfect coach", because he had no ambition whatsoever to manage, turning down numerous offers over the years to do so.[8] After 37 years, longing to be closer to his family in Northern California,[9] he left the franchise to join the expansion Seattle Pilots in 1969.[10] He moved to the Minnesota Twins from 1970 to 1971, after the Pilots (who became the Milwaukee Brewers) didn't renew his contract.[11]

It has been said of Crosetti that he has waved home 16,000 runners in 25 years in the third-base coaching box.[12]

Death

Crosetti died in 2002 at age 91 from complications of a fall in Stockton, California and was entombed at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma. He was survived by his wife of 63 years, Norma, his son, John, and his daughter, Ellen.[13]

See also

References

  1. ^ Paul Glader (February 21, 2002). "Frank Crosetti". WebCite. Archived from the original on September 2, 2009.
  2. ^ "1932 World Series". Baseball-Reference.com. September 28 – October 2, 1932.
  3. ^ "1936 All-Star Game". Baseball-Reference.com. July 7, 1936.
  4. ^ "1936 World Series, Game Three". Baseball-Reference.com. October 3, 1936.
  5. ^ "1938 World Series, Game Two". Baseball-Reference.com. October 6, 1938.
  6. ^ "Landis Fines Yanks Stars". The Pittsburgh Press. November 6, 1942.
  7. ^ Mike Sommer (March 6, 2011). "Classic Yankees: Frank Crosetti". Bronx Baseball Daily.
  8. ^ Grayson, Harry (October 3, 1957). "Crosetti Most Typical Yankee". New York World Telegram & Sun.
  9. ^ Durso, Joseph (October 5, 1968). "Crosetti Ends 37 Years as Yankee". The New York Times.
  10. ^ "Crosetti Ends Stint With Yanks". The Windsor Star. October 4, 1968.
  11. ^ Lamey, Mike (April 25, 1970). "Frank Crosetti -- Baseball's No.1 Traffic Cop". Minneapolis Star.
  12. ^ Roy Blount Jr. (May 10, 1971). "A Chance To Stay In A Young Man's Game". Sports Illustrated.
  13. ^ Goldstein, Richard (February 13, 2002). "Frank Crosetti, 91, a Fixture In Yankee Pinstripes, Is Dead". New York Times. p. 2.

External links

1932 New York Yankees season

The 1932 New York Yankees season was the team's 30th season in New York, and its 32nd season overall. The team finished with a record of 107–47, winning their seventh pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by future Hall of Famer Joe McCarthy. A record nine future Hall of Famers played on the team (Earle Combs, Bill Dickey, Lou Gehrig, Lefty Gomez, Tony Lazzeri, Herb Pennock, Red Ruffing, Babe Ruth, Joe Sewell).

The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Chicago Cubs. They are the only major-league team ever to go an entire season without being shut out.

1933 New York Yankees season

The 1933 New York Yankees season was the team's 31st season in New York and its 33rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 91–59, finishing 7 games behind the Washington Senators. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1934 New York Yankees season

The 1934 New York Yankees season was the team's 32nd season in New York and its 34th season overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 7 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. It would also be the final year Babe Ruth would play as a Yankee.

1935 New York Yankees season

The 1935 New York Yankees season was the team's 33rd season in New York and its 35th season overall. The team finished with a record of 89–60, finishing 3 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1936 New York Yankees season

The 1936 New York Yankees season was the team's 34th season in New York and its 36th season overall. The team finished with a record of 102–51, winning their 8th pennant, finishing 19.5 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the New York Giants in 6 games.

1937 New York Yankees season

The 1937 New York Yankees season was their 35th season. The team finished with a record of 102–52, winning their 9th pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the New York Giants in 5 games. This gave the Yankees a 3-to-2 edge in overall series play against the Giants.

1937 saw significant changes in the layout of Yankee Stadium, as concrete bleachers were built to replace the aging wooden structure, reducing the cavernous "death valley" of left center and center considerably, although the area remained a daunting target for right-handed power hitters such as Joe DiMaggio.

1938 Major League Baseball season

The 1938 Major League Baseball season.

1938 New York Yankees season

The 1938 New York Yankees season was their 36th season. The team finished with a record of 99–53, winning their 10th pennant, finishing 9.5 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the 1938 World Series, they beat the Chicago Cubs in 4 games. This marked the first time any team had won three consecutive World Series.

1938 World Series

The 1938 World Series matched the two-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Chicago Cubs, with the Yankees sweeping the Series in four games for their seventh championship overall and record third straight (they would win four in a row from 1936 to 1939, and five in a row later from 1949 to 1953).

Dizzy Dean, who had helped carry the Cubs to the National League pennant despite a sore arm, ran out of gas in the Series as the Yanks crushed the Cubs again, as they had in 1932. Yankee starting pitcher Red Ruffing won two games, although he allowed 17 hits in 18 innings pitched. After Game 2 of the Series, the Bronx Bombers would not return to Wrigley Field for nearly 65 years until a three-game interleague series with the Cubs beginning June 6, 2003.

This was the first World Series played at Wrigley Field following the bleacher reconstruction of 1937, which had significantly shortened the left-center field power alley.

1939 New York Yankees season

The 1939 New York Yankees season was the team's 37th season in New York, and its 39th overall. The team finished with a record of 106–45, winning their 11th pennant, finishing 17 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the Cincinnati Reds in 4 games. This marked the first time any team had won four consecutive World Series and the first season for the team's radio gameday broadcasts.

1940 New York Yankees season

The 1940 New York Yankees season was the team's 38th season in New York and its 40th overall. The team finished in third place with a record of 88–66, finishing two games behind the American League champion Detroit Tigers and one game behind the second-place Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. Their home games were played at the Yankee Stadium.

1941 New York Yankees season

The 1941 New York Yankees season was the 39th season for the team in New York, and its 41st season overall. The team finished with a record of 101–53, winning their 12th pennant, finishing 17 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in 5 games.

Books and songs have been written about the 1941 season, the last before the United States became drawn into World War II. Yankees' center fielder Joe DiMaggio captured the nation's fancy with his lengthy hitting streak that extended through 56 games before finally being stopped. A big-band style song called Joltin' Joe DiMaggio was a hit for the Les Brown orchestra.

1942 New York Yankees season

The 1942 New York Yankees season was the team's 40th season in New York and its 42nd overall. The team finished with a record of 103–51, winning their 13th pennant, finishing 9 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in 5 games.

1943 New York Yankees season

The 1943 New York Yankees season was the team's 41st season in New York, and its 43rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 98–56, winning their 14th pennant, finishing 13.5 games ahead of the Washington Senators. Managed by Joe McCarthy, the Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in 5 games.

1945 New York Yankees season

The 1945 New York Yankees season was the team's 43rd season in New York and its 45th overall. The team finished in fourth place in the American League with a record of 81–71, finishing 6.5 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1947 New York Yankees season

The 1947 New York Yankees season was the team's 45th season in New York, and its 47th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 15th pennant, finishing 12 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games. It was the first ever season of the Yankees to be broadcast live on television with WABD providing the television broadcast feed to viewers in the city.

1948 New York Yankees season

The 1948 New York Yankees season was the team's 46th season in New York and its 48th overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 2.5 games behind the Cleveland Indians and 1.5 games behind the second-place Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

The fractional games-behind came about due to the frenzied pennant race, which saw the Yankees, Red Sox and Indians all battling it out to the end. The Yankees fell just a little short, and the Red Sox and Indians finished in a tie for first at 96–58. They held a one-game playoff, which counted as part of the regular season, so the Indians' victory raised their record to 97–58, and dropped the Red Sox to 96–59.

The Yankees did not renew Bucky Harris' contract after the season, opting instead to hire Casey Stengel starting in 1949. This move raised some eyebrows, but Stengel had just led the Oakland Oaks to the Pacific Coast League pennant in 1948, demonstrating that with good talent, he had a good chance to succeed. The Yankees were about to begin the most dominating stretch of their long dynasty.

1968 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1968 followed rules revised in June 1967, which returned the BBWAA to annual elections without any provision for runoff.

In the event, the Baseball Writers' Association of America voted once by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected Joe Medwick.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider executives, managers, umpires, and earlier major league players.

It selected two players, Kiki Cuyler and Goose Goslin.

World Series ring

A World Series ring is an award given to Major League Baseball players who win the World Series. Since only one Commissioner's Trophy is awarded to the team, a World Series ring is an individual award that players and staff of each World Series champion team get to keep for themselves to symbolize the victory. World Series rings are uniquely commissioned by the winning team each year and presented to deserving players and staff early in the next season. The rings have been made by companies that include Jostens, Tiffany & Co., Dieges & Clust, and L.G. Balfour Company.

The first World Series ring was given to members of the New York Giants after winning the 1922 World Series. By the 1930s, each winning team gave their players a ring. Though the ring started off simple, usually containing only one diamond, rings over time have become more elaborate and ornate, with the 2003 World Series ring containing over 200 diamonds.

In addition to their inherent value, World Series rings also carry additional value as sports memorabilia. A World Series ring belonging to Casey Stengel sold for $180,000. Lenny Dykstra's 1986 World Series ring sold for over $56,000 during his bankruptcy proceedings. Other rings sold in auctions have sold for over $10,000 apiece. Replica rings given to fans have sold for as much as $300.

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