Frankford High School

Frankford High School is a public high school in the School District of Philadelphia. It is located at Oxford Avenue and Wakeling Street in the Frankford section of Northeast Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.

Frankford was founded in 1910 as an annex to Central High School. For the school's colors, blue was added to the red and gold of Central. Frankford's slogan is "Home of Champions," a nod to its longstanding tradition of fielding strong sports teams. The school's athletic teams are nicknamed the Pioneers.

In the fall of 2018, Frankford High School became Frankford High School Aviation Academy, launching a unique program to provide a career path for the graduates of the program. Beginning with the class of 2022, students have the opportunity to enroll in the Aviation Program. After their completion, they can earn their private pilot license and by the time they are 21 be eligible for their commercial pilot license. The program will also include multiple tracks of study including drone-piloting and airplane mechanic/maintenance. [2]

Frankford's soccer team won ten straight Public League Championships (1987–1996), four of which by shutout.[3] Frankford's wrestling team won eleven straight Public League Championships ending in 2007. On May 19, 2010, Principal Reginald Fisher was cited in a report appearing in the Philadelphia newspapers that he was one of 15 administrators not certified to run their schools.[4] Whether this issue has been resolved has not been reported as of present.

Frankford High School
Address
Frankford High School is located in Pennsylvania
Frankford High School
Frankford High School
Frankford High School is located in the United States
Frankford High School
Frankford High School
Oxford Avenue and Wakeling Street,

,
19124

United States
Information
TypePublic High School
MottoHome of Champions
Established1910
School districtThe School District of Philadelphia
PrincipalMichael Calderone
Faculty67.90 FTE
Enrollment1,210 (2014-15)[1]
Color(s)Gold     , Navy Blue     , and Crimson     
SloganHome of Champions
MascotFrontier Pioneer
Website

School Programs

Students have the opportunity to join multiple athletic, academic, and artistic groups/classes at school. Current offerings include:

Debate - National Honor Society - Frankford Voices (choir) - Band - Ceramics - Visual Arts - Photography - Drumline - Modern Band - Journalism - Personal Law - Boys/Girls Soccer - Boys/Girls Basketball - Boys/Girls Lacrosse - Co-Ed Cross Country - Co-Ed Tennis - Bowling - Girls Badminton - Baseball - Softball - Football - Unified Sports - Junior ROTC

Neighborhoods served

Neighborhoods served by the school include Bridesburg and [[Frankford, Philadelphia],[(Northwood, Philadelphia)] Wissinoming, Oxford Circle and Juniata Pennsylvania|Frankford]].[5]

Feeder patterns

Harding Middle School is Frankford's most significant "feeder school", or one in which its graduating students matriculate to Frankford High.[6]

Notable alumni

See also

References

  1. ^ "Frankford HS". National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved November 11, 2017.
  2. ^ https://frankfordhs.philasd.org/aviation/. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-07-05. Retrieved 2008-09-12.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ http://www.philly.com/philly/education/20100519_The_15_without_proper_paperwork.html
  5. ^ "Frankford High School Geographic Boundaries Archived 2012-03-28 at the Wayback Machine." School District of Philadelphia. Retrieved on October 4, 2011.
  6. ^ Home page. Frankford High School. Retrieved on August 16, 2016. "Mr. Calderone spent the 8 years prior to becoming principal of Frankford High School as the principal of Harding Middle School, our largest feeder school."
  7. ^ "Ralph Lewis Stats - Basketball-Reference.com". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved 14 April 2018.
  8. ^ "John Richter Stats - Basketball-Reference.com". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved 14 April 2018.
  9. ^ Anatasia, George (2004-10-14). "Kin say arson suspect is innocent Kaboni Savage's mother said her son was not involved in a fatal N. Phila. blaze that killed relatives of a drug informant". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 2016-08-16.

External links

Coordinates: 40°01′19″N 75°05′06″W / 40.022°N 75.085°W

Bill Green IV

William Joseph Green IV (born March 29, 1965) is the former chair of the School Reform Commission of the School District of Philadelphia and a former Democratic Councilman-at-Large on the City Council of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Bill has focused his work in City Council on accountability and fiscal discipline, constituent service, and quality of life for city residents.

Blair Thomas

Blair Lamar Thomas (born October 7, 1967) is a former professional American football running back in the National Football League for the New York Jets, New England Patriots, Dallas Cowboys, Atlanta Falcons and Carolina Panthers. He played college football at Penn State University.

Bobby Higginson

Robert Leigh Higginson (born August 18, 1970) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Detroit Tigers where he wore the number 4. He attended Frankford High School and Temple University.

Higginson was drafted by the Tigers in the 12th round of the 1992 MLB Draft. His rookie year was 1995 when he played 130 games for the Tigers. Higginson batted .320 in 1996 and .300 in 2000, scored over 100 runs in 2000 and drove in over 100 runs in 1997 and 2000. His career high of 30 home-runs came also in 2000. He twice led the Majors in outfield assists, and also led all American League left fielders in putouts in 2000 (305) and 2001 (321), although he never won a Gold Glove for his fielding. He was never named to an All-Star team.

On June 30 and July 1, 1997, Higginson tied a major league record by hitting four home runs in four consecutive at bats (note, there were some walks interspersed) -- three on the first day, and then another in the first inning of the second day.Higginson was named "Tiger of the Year" by the Detroit chapter of the BBWAA in 1997 and 2000. Since the award's inception in 1965, ten players have been named "Tiger of the Year" on multiple occasions: Higginson, Justin Verlander, Miguel Cabrera, Travis Fryman, Cecil Fielder, Alan Trammell, Lou Whitaker, Kirk Gibson, Ron LeFlore, and Denny McLain.An elbow injury limited Higginson to 10 games in 2005, which ended up being his final season. He was granted free agency on October 31, and he retired at the age of 35. He ended his career never having played on a team that had a winning season.

Higginson is also known for breaking up a no-hitter in the ninth inning and two out on a game in Toronto on September 27, 1998, with a pinch-hit home run. The pitcher, future All-Star Roy Halladay, was making his second ever appearance, and ended up winning his first career game, 2–1.

Bridesburg, Philadelphia

Bridesburg, the northernmost of Philadelphia's River Wards, is a river-front neighborhood in the Northeast section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. Bridesburg is an historically German and Irish community, with a significant community of Polish immigrants who arrived mostly in the early- to mid-twentieth century. The community is home to two Catholic churches: All Saints Church, designed by Edwin Forrest Durang, built in 1889; and Saint John Cantius Church, built some time after 1892 in Polish Cathedral style.

Chuck Kress

Charles Steven Kress (December 9, 1921 – March 4, 2014) was an American professional baseball player and manager. The first baseman played in all or parts of four seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1947 and 1954 for the Cincinnati Reds, Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers and Brooklyn Dodgers, appearing in 175 games. His 17-year active career was interrupted by three years' service in the United States Army during World War II (1943–1945). Kress was born in Philadelphia, where he attended Frankford High School.

Kress threw and batted left-handed, and was listed as 6 feet (1.8 m) tall and 190 pounds (86 kg). In MLB, he appeared in one full season, 1949, and parts of three others. In that full campaign, he began the year with the Reds, got into 27 games, then was sold to the White Sox in June. In Chicago, he batted .278 in 97 games with 104 hits and became the White Sox' regular first baseman. But only one of his hits was a home run, and after Kress began 1950 by going hitless in eight at bats, he was sold to the St. Louis Cardinals' organization and returned to the minor leagues.

In his 175 big-league games, Kress batted .249 with 116 hits, including 20 doubles. His lone MLB home run was a solo shot off the Tigers' Fred Hutchinson on July 1. As a minor leaguer, he got into 1,745 games and became a manager in the Tigers' and Philadelphia Phillies' farm systems. He retired from baseball in 1961, and moved to Rush Lake, Minnesota, in 1973, to St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1980, and to Sandpoint, Idaho, in 2002.

Clifford Gray (politician)

Clifford Gray, Jr. (born May 31, 1940) is a former Democratic member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives.

Francis Ryan

Francis J. “Hun” Ryan (January 10, 1908 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – October 14, 1977 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was an American soccer midfielder. He earned three caps, scoring one goal, with the U.S. national team between 1928 and 1936. He was also a member of the U.S. teams at the 1928 Summer Olympics, 1936 Summer Olympics and the 1934 FIFA World Cup. Ryan was inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame in 1958.

Frankford, Philadelphia

Frankford is a neighborhood in the Northeast section of Philadelphia situated about six miles (10 km) Northeast of Center City. Although its borders are vaguely defined, the neighborhood is bounded roughly by the original course of Frankford Creek on the south to Adams Avenue on the southwest, to Roosevelt Boulevard on the west border to Bridge Street on the north to the Trenton Line on the east. Adjacent neighborhoods are Bridesburg, Kensington, Juniata, Oxford Circle, Summerdale, and Wissinoming. Historically, Frankford had an unofficial division separating Frankford (proper) from East Frankford encompassing the area east of Frankford Avenue. The division divided the community first along racial lines, with African Americans on the east of Frankford Avenue and Caucasians to the west. As the community has become less homogeneous, the division is more of a vestige of the past.

In 2005, the 19124 ZIP code, which roughly contains Frankford and Juniata, had a median home sale price of $81,075, an increase of 22% over 2004.

Frankfort High School

Frankfort High School is the name of several high schools in the United States:

Frankfort High School (Michigan) – Frankfort, Michigan

Frankfort High School (Indiana) – Frankfort, Indiana

Frankfort High School (Kansas) – Frankfort, Kansas

Frankfort High School (Kentucky) – Frankfort, Kentucky

Frankfort High School (West Virginia) – Short Gap, West VirginiaSee also:

Frankford High School

Jahri Evans

Jahri Divine Evans (born August 22, 1983) is an American football guard who is currently a free agent. He played college football at Bloomsburg. Evans was drafted by the New Orleans Saints in the fourth round of the 2006 NFL Draft and won Super Bowl XLIV with the team over the Indianapolis Colts. He has also been a member of the Seattle Seahawks and Green Bay Packers.

Although only a fourth round draft pick from a small school, Evans established a reputation as one of the best guards in the National Football League (NFL), and in May 2010 the Saints signed him to a contract that made him the highest-paid guard in NFL history at the time.

James Clay (Pennsylvania politician)

James W. Clay, Jr. is Democratic member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, representing the 179th legislative district. He was elected in 2012 after his predecessor, Tony Payton, was removed from the ballot due to a failure to collect the proper number of signature, leaving him as the only candidate remaining.

Mr. Clay frequently goes by the nickname "Scoot" in his personal life. He is a graduate of Frankford High School.

John Richter

John Fritz Richter (March 12, 1937 – March, 1983) was an American basketball player. He attended Frankford High School in Philadelphia.

A 6'9" forward from North Carolina State University, Richter played one season (1959–60) in the NBA as a member of the Boston Celtics. He averaged 4.3 points per game and earned an NBA Championship ring when the Celtics defeated the St. Louis Hawks in the 1960 NBA Finals.

Following his NBA career, Richter moved to the Eastern Basketball Association playing for the Sunbury Mercuries in Sunbury, Pennsylvania. Richter possessed a formidable hook shot and was frequently one of the EBA's top rebounders.

Mariana McCaulley

Mariana McCaulley (1890–December 26, 1946) was an epigrapher and Latin teacher.

Mike Jarmoluk

Michael M. Jarmoluk, Jr. (October 22, 1922 – November 23, 2004) was an American football defensive lineman in the National Football League for the Chicago Bears, Boston Yanks, New York Bulldogs, and the Philadelphia Eagles. He played college football at Temple University and was drafted in the seventh round of the 1945 NFL Draft by the Detroit Lions. He attended Frankford High School.

Jarmoluk went to one Pro Bowl during his ten-year career.

Tony Bono

Anthony "Tony" Bono is a retired American soccer player who played professionally in the Major Indoor Soccer League, American Indoor Soccer Association, National Professional Soccer League and Lone Star Soccer Alliance.

Bono graduated from Frankford High School where he was a 1979 First Team and 1980 Second Team All State soccer player. Bono then attended Drexel University where he was a 1984 first team All American soccer player. In 1985, the Minnesota Strikers of the Major Indoor Soccer League drafted Bono in the third round. In December 1987, the Strikers waived Bono. On January 15, 1988, the Chicago Sting signed Bono to a ten-day contract. The Sting kept Bono on the roster until they folded at the end of the season. Bono then spent the summer season with the Houston Dynamos of the Lone Star Soccer Alliance. The Dynamos went to the championship game where they fell to Dallas Mean Green. In the fall of 1988, Bono signed with the Hershey Impact of the American Indoor Soccer Association but was traded to the Dayton Dynamo on November 2, 1988 for a second round draft pick and cash. He remained with the Dynamo until 1996. In January 1995, Bono became head coach of the Dynamo. The team ownership made this decision because Bono had acted as head coach at the end of the 1991-1992 season and had suffered a season-ending knee injury earlier in the 1994-1995 season. During the 1995 off-season, the Dynamos moved to Cincinnati, Ohio to become the Cincinnati Silverbacks. On November 17, 1995, the Silverbacks traded Bono to the Chicago Power. On March 6, 1996, the Power sent Bono to the Milwaukee Wave. In June 1996, Bono moved to the Philadelphia Kixx.

In 2001, he was inducted into the Southeastern Pennsylvania Soccer Hall of Fame.

Tony Payton

Tony J. Payton Jr. was a Democratic member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, representing the 179th legislative district encompassing the historic communities of Frankford, Oxford Circle, Hunting Park, Olney and Feltonville. He was elected in 2006. and sworn into his first term on January 2, 2007. He is now a registered lobbyist with Malady & Wooten, LLP.Before Rep. Payton was elected to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, he worked as a housing counselor at United Communities in South Philadelphia where he educated low-income families on personal finance to help them achieve homeownership. It was through this work that Rep. Payton realized his desire for public service and consequently, pursued and won a seat in the Pennsylvania General Assembly, making him the youngest elected official in the Commonwealth at the time.

In 2007, Rep. Payton was elected president of the Pennsylvania Young Democrats, a statewide organization with 47 chapters throughout the Commonwealth. As president of PYD, Rep. Payton has led a campaign to engage young professionals throughout Pennsylvania to join in the democratic process.

During his tenure in the General Assembly in 2006, Rep. Payton was at the forefront of education reform in Pennsylvania. He introduced legislation to create the Pennsylvania Youth Commission and authored the REACH Scholarship Initiative. He served on the Human Services Subcommittee on Mental Health as the Democratic Chair, the Professional Licensure Committee, the State Government Committee as the Democratic Secretary and also was the Democratic Chair of the Transportation Subcommittee on Railroads.

Rep. Payton was a 2005-06 fellow with the Center for Progressive Leadership. He was actively involved with Philadelphia’s Young Non-profit Leaders. He is also a big brother with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeastern Pennsylvania and currently a mentor for students nearby at Frankford High School. In 2007, he was awarded the leadership award as one of the most influential African Americans by the Philadelphia Tribune.

Rep. Payton is currently attending classes at Temple University and is president of the Pennsylvania Young Democrats. Prior to elective office, Payton worked as a housing counselor for the United Communities in South Philadelphia. In 2007, the Philadelphia Tribune named him one of the most influential African Americans.

Wissinoming, Philadelphia

Wissinoming is a neighborhood in the Near Northeast section of Philadelphia. It was the site of locomotive builder Matthias Baldwin's estate "Wissinoming", which was located near Tacony and Van Kirk Streets. The current Wissinoming is bordered by Mayfair and Tacony on the north, Bridesburg on the south, I-95 and the Delaware River on the east, and Frankford on the west. Wissinoming has one zipcode 19135.Physical boundaries are: Levick Street on the north, Cheltenham Avenue on the south, I-95 and the Delaware River on the east, and Frankford Avenue on the west. Its borders with Frankford and Bridesburg are often disputed, with some pushing the southern boundary further to either Sanger Street or Bridge Street. In addition, its northern border with Tacony is often disputed, with some claiming the border to be as far north as Magee Avenue to as far south as Devereaux Avenue.

Woody Hartman

Woody Hartman is a retired American soccer goalkeeper and coach. He played professionally in the American Soccer League, leading the league in saves in 1976, and the Major Indoor Soccer League. He also coached at the collegiate and professional levels.

Hartman graduated from Frankford High School. He attended Temple University where he played on the men’s soccer team from 1972 to 1974. In 1976, Hartman turned professional with the New Jersey Americans of the American Soccer League. He led the league in saves. That fall, he began his coaching career as head coach of the Father Judge High School soccer team, a position he held until 1980. In 2006, Father Judge High School inducted Hartman into its Hall of Honor. He did not play professionally again until 1978 when he signed with the Philadelphia Fever of the Major Indoor Soccer League. He spent three seasons with the Fever. In 1984, Hartman became the assistant coach to Lew Meehl at Philadelphia Textile. In 1993, both Meehl and Hartman moved to Drexel University. On September 26, 1996, Hartman left Drexel to become the goalkeeper coach for the Philadelphia KiXX of the National Professional Soccer League. In 1997, he returned to Drexel as an assistant to Meehl.

Zaire Anderson

Zaire Anderson (born August 18, 1992) is an American football linebacker who is currently a free agent. He played college football at Nebraska.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania schools

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