Frank Winters

Frank Mitchell Winters (born January 23, 1964) is a former American football center in the National Football League for the Cleveland Browns, New York Giants, Kansas City Chiefs, and the Green Bay Packers.

Frank Winters
refer to caption
Winters in 2015
No. 52
Position:Center
Personal information
Born:January 23, 1964 (age 55)
Hoboken, New Jersey
Career information
College:Western Illinois
NFL Draft:1987 / Round: 10 / Pick: 276
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:231
Games started:147
Fumble recoveries:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life

Frank Mitchell Winters was born in Hoboken, New Jersey. He lived in Union City, and played football at Emerson High School.[1]

Career

Winters played college football at Western Illinois University and was drafted in the tenth round of the 1987 NFL Draft.

Winters was the Packers' starting center serving for eight straight seasons (1993–2000). He played in the Pro Bowl and also earned USA Today All-Pro honors in 1999. His nickname was "Frankie Baggadonuts" or "Old Bag of Donuts".

On July 18, 2008, Winters was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame. His ceremony was marked by heightened media interest because quarterback Brett Favre gave the induction speech amidst the developing saga regarding Favre's status with the Packers.

On May 20, 2009, Winters got an internship with the Indianapolis Colts.

He has part ownership in a popular Missouri bar and grill, Frankie & Johnny's.

References

  1. ^ "Frank Winters - Class of 2012" Archived 2013-04-15 at Archive.today, Hudson County Sports Hall of Fame. Accessed February 6, 2012. "A native of Hoboken, Winters is a former American football center in the National Football League for the Cleveland Browns (1987-88), New York Giants (1989), Kansas City Chiefs (1990-91), and the Green Bay Packers (1992-2002)."
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