Frank Twedell

Francis A. Twedell (May 29, 1917 – May 14, 1969) was guard in the National Football League. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the seventh round of the 1939 NFL Draft and played with the team that season.[1][2]

Frank Twedell
Position:Guard
Personal information
Born:May 29, 1917
Austin, Minnesota
Died:May 14, 1969 (aged 51)
Madison, Wisconsin
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
College:Minnesota
NFL Draft:1939 / Round: 7 / Pick: 59
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:4
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ "Frank Twedell". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved 2010-12-24.
  2. ^ http://www.profootballarchives.com/twed00200.html
1937 College Football All-America Team

The 1937 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1937. The ten selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1937 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, (9) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA), and (10) the Sporting News (SN).

1937 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1937 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1937 Big Ten Conference football season. In their sixth year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–2 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 184 to 50.End Ray King was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation and Look magazine. Fullback Andy Uram was named an All-American by the Associated Press. King, halfback Rudy Gmitro, tackle Lou Midler and guard Frank Twedell were named All-Big Ten first team.Rudy Gmitro was awarded the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 254,188, which averaged to 50,838. The season high for attendance was against Notre Dame.

1938 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1938 Big Ten Conference football season was the 43rd season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1938 college football season.

The Big Ten Conference championship went to Bernie Bierman's 1938 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team. Minnesota compiled a 6–2 record, outscored its opponents 97 to 38, and was ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll. Guard Frank Twedell was a first-team All-American. Twedell and quarterback Wilbur Moore were first-team picks for the All-Big Ten team.

Michigan, in its first year under head coach Fritz Crisler, compiled a 6–1–1 record, outscored opponents 131 to 40, led the conference in scoring offense (16.4 points per game), and was ranked No. 16 in the final AP Poll. The team's only setbacks were a 7-6 loss to Minnesota and a scoreless tie with Northwestern. Michigan guard Ralph Heikkinen was a consensus first-team All-American. Sophomore backs Tom Harmon and Forest Evashevski were both first-team All-Big Ten players.

Northwestern, under head coach Pappy Waldorf, compiled a 4–2–2 record, outscored opponents 93 to 32, led the conference in scoring defense (4.0 points per game), and was ranked No. 17 in the final AP Poll. Tackle Bob Voigts was a first-team All-American.

Wisconsin fullback Howard Weiss received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the conference. Ralph Heikkinen finished in second place in the voting and Larry Buhler of Minnesota was third.

1938 College Football All-America Team

The 1938 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1938. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1938 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News.

Four players were unanimous All-Americans on all of the major All-American teams: TCU quarterback (and 1938 Heisman Trophy winner) Davey O'Brien, Pittsburgh fullback Marshall Goldberg, Michigan guard Ralph Heikkinen and Notre Dame tackle Ed Beinor.

1938 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1938 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1938 Big Ten Conference football season. In their seventh year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–2 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 97 to 38.Guard Frank Twedell was named an All-American by the Associated Press and United Press. Twedell and quarterback Wilbur Moore were named All-Big Ten first team.Fullback Larry Buhler was awarded the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 237,000, which averaged to 47,400. The season high for attendance was against Michigan.

1939 NFL Draft

The 1939 National Football League Draft was held on December 9, 1938, at the New Yorker Hotel in New York City, New York.

Austin, Minnesota

Austin is a city in Mower County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 24,718 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Mower County. The town was originally settled along the Cedar River and has two artificial lakes, East Side Lake and Mill Pond. It was named for Austin R. Nichols, the first settler in the area.Hormel Foods Corporation is Austin's largest employer, and the town is sometimes called "SPAM Town USA". Austin is home to Hormel's corporate headquarters, a factory that makes most of North America's SPAM tinned meat, and the Spam Museum. Austin is also home to the Hormel Institute, a leading cancer research institution operated by the University of Minnesota with significant support from the Mayo Clinic.Austin has been named one of the "Top 10 Affordable Small Towns Where You'd Actually Want to Live," as well as one of the "Best Small Cities in America" for 2015.

Green Bay Packers draft history

This page is a list of the Green Bay Packers NFL Draft selections. The Packers have participated in every NFL draft since it began in 1936, in which they made Russ Letlow their first-ever selection.

List of Minnesota Golden Gophers in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Minnesota Golden Gophers football players in the NFL Draft.

List of University of Minnesota people

This is a list of notable people associated with the University of Minnesota.

Ma and Pa Kettle

Ma and Pa Kettle are comic film characters of the successful film series of the same name, produced by Universal Studios, in the late 1940s and 1950s. They are a hillbilly couple with sixteen children whose lives are turned upside-down when they win a model-home-of-the-future in a slogan-writing contest. At the verge of getting their farm condemned, the Kettles move into the prize home that is different from their country lifestyle. After that, they are subjected to more unusual situations.

Originally based on real-life farming neighbors in Washington State, United States, Ma and Pa Kettle were created by Betty MacDonald in whose 1945 best-selling novel, The Egg and I, they appeared. The success of the novel spawned the 1947 film The Egg and I starring Claudette Colbert and Fred MacMurray, also co-starring Marjorie Main and Percy Kilbride as Ma and Pa Kettle. Main was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role.After the audiences' positive reaction to the Kettles in the film, Universal Studios produced nine more films, with Marjorie Main reprising her role in all and Percy Kilbride reprising his in seven. The films grossed an estimated $35 million altogether at the box office and are said to have saved Universal from bankruptcy.

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