Frank Sinkwich

Frank Francis Sinkwich Sr. (October 10, 1920 – October 22, 1990) was an American football player and coach. He won the Heisman Trophy in 1942 playing for the University of Georgia, making him the first recipient from the Southeastern Conference.[1] In the course of a brief but celebrated career in professional football, Sinkwich was selected for the National Football League Most Valuable Player Award. He coached the Erie (PA) Vets semi-professional football team in 1949. Sinkwich was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954.[2]

Frank Sinkwich
refer to caption
Sinkwich, c. 1942–43
No. 21
Position:Halfback
Personal information
Born:October 10, 1920
Starjak, Croatia
Died:October 22, 1990 (aged 70)
Athens, Georgia
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:Youngstown (OH) Chaney
College:Georgia
NFL Draft:1943 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 1947
Attempts–completions:301–121
Passing yards:1,913
TD–Int:19–42
Rushing yards:1,090
Rushing touchdowns:7
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Sinkwich is of Croat origin.[3] He was born in Starjak, Croatia (about 12 miles west of Zagreb) as his mother had traveled back to Croatia in 1912. World War I broke out in 1914 and as with many, she and the children remained there for the duration of the war. They returned to the US, going to Youngstown, Ohio when he was two years old, joining his father Ignac (Ignatius) who operated a grocery store. By 1940, the family operated a restaurant in Youngstown. His surname was originally spelled Sinković.

According to an article Sinkwich wrote in 1988, he grew to appreciate the value of competitiveness on the streets of Youngstown's west side. "I learned early in neighborhood pickup games that I had the desire to compete", he wrote. "When people ask why I succeeded in athletics, I always tell them that I didn't want to get beat".[1]

Football career

Sinkwich gained early recognition as a star athlete at Youngstown's Chaney High School.[1] He went on to the University of Georgia to play under coach Wally Butts where he was a two-time All-America selection. In 1941 he led the nation in rushing yards with 209 carries for 1,103 yards. He set the NCAA single-season total offense record of 2,187 yards[4] and led the Bulldogs to an 11–1 season in 1942, capturing the Southeastern Conference championship and a victory over UCLA in the 1943 Rose Bowl.[n 1] That same year, the Washington D.C. Touchdown Club honored Sinkwich as "back of the year",[5] and he was overwhelmingly voted the "Number 1 athlete for 1942" in the annual poll by the Associated Press over second-place finisher Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox,[6] a year in which Williams hit for baseball's triple crown.

The 1942 season was Sinkwich's first year of backfield-mate Charley Trippi. Georgia defeated Florida 75–0, the worst defeat in the history of Florida football. Sinkwich played with a broken jaw and kicked a field goal in a 19–3 defeat of Florida in 1941.[7]

In his three-year college career, Sinkwich rushed for 2,271 yards, passed for 2,331 yards, and accounted for 60 touchdowns (30 rushing and 30 passing).[1] Sinkwich earned his Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.Ed.) from the university in 1943 and was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity.[8]

After his collegiate career, Sinkwich joined the United States Marine Corps; however, due to his flat feet he received a medical discharge and proceeded to play with the Detroit Lions, who had selected him first overall in the 1943 NFL Draft.[9] In Detroit, he earned All-Pro honors in 1943–1944, as well as being named as NFL MVP in 1944.[1]

After his two years in Detroit, Sinkwich served in both the United States Merchant Marines and the United States Army Air Forces, but a knee injury received while playing for the 2nd Air Force service team in 1945 hampered his playing career when he returned to professional football in 1946 and 1947.[1][9] He coached the semi-professional Erie (PA) Vets football team in 1949. Sinkwich was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954.[1]

Legacy

Sinkwich died after a long illness, in Athens, Georgia. Nowhere did his death elicit more emotion than at his alma mater. "We've lost one of the great legends in football history," said then Georgia athletic director Vince Dooley. "He was not only a great player but a wonderful person and citizen of Athens".[1]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ At the Rose Bowl in the team picture he was placed in number 52 instead of 21 because they did not want the press to be all over him.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Frank Sinkwich was worshipped by his fans". The Vindicator. October 23, 1990.
  2. ^ "Frank Sinkwich". Georgia Bulldogs official site. Retrieved September 19, 2009.
  3. ^ Croatian Chronicle Network 35 Pacific Northwest Croatian Athletes
  4. ^ Magill, Dan (1993). "Chapter 2". Dan Magill's Bull-Doggerel:Fifty Years of Anecdotes from the Greatest Bulldog Ever (1st Printing ed.). Marietta, Georgia: Longstreet Press. pp. 43–48. ISBN 1-56352-089-3.
  5. ^ Perazich, Chuck (June 14, 1982). "Frank Sinkwich Lauded at Croatian Home Fete". The Vindicator.
  6. ^ "Who Won". Time. December 28, 1942. Retrieved January 6, 2007.
  7. ^ http://jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/102705/col_20135405.shtml#.V8H9Y62yn21
  8. ^ https://www.pikes.org/ProminentPikes.aspx?pid=3&spid=53
  9. ^ a b Grosshandler, Stan (August 1997). "Georgia's Greatest?" (PDF). College Football Historical Quarterly. X (IV). Retrieved January 6, 2007.

External links

1924 Georgia Bulldogs football team

The 1924 Georgia Bulldogs football team represented the Georgia Bulldogs of the University of Georgia during the 1924 Southern Conference football season. In the team's second season under head coach George Cecil Woodruff, the Bulldogs completed the season with a record of 7–3–0. It included a narrow 7–6 loss to football powerhouse Yale. The other losses in the season came in the last two games against Southern Conference (SoCon) champion Alabama and Southern champion Centre. Six of the seven wins in the season were shutouts.

The season was also notable for the victory over Vanderbilt by a single Scrappy Moore drop kick,' in which All-American Vanderbilt end Lynn Bomar also suffered his career ending injury. Moore's field goal was the last made by a Bulldog until seventeen years later when Frank Sinkwich did so against Florida with a broken jaw in 1941.

All-Southerns included end Smack Thompson and tackle Jim Taylor.

1941 All-SEC football team

The 1941 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1941 college football season. Mississippi State won the conference.

1941 College Football All-America Team

The 1941 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1941. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1941 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News.

Harvard center Endicott Peabody, who won the 1941 Knute Rockne Award, was the only player to be unanimously named to the first team of all nine official selectors. Dick Wildung of Minnesota and Bob Westfall of Michigan each received eight official first-team designations. Bruce Smith of Minnesota won the 1941 Heisman Trophy and received seven official first-team nominations.

1941 Georgia Bulldogs football team

The 1941 Georgia Bulldogs football team represented the Georgia Bulldogs of the University of Georgia during the 1941 college football season. Early in the season, halfback Frank Sinkwich suffered a broken jaw, and had to play with his jaw wired shut and a large jaw protector attached to his helmet. Despite this Sinkwich was selected All-American, leading the Bulldogs to an Orange Bowl victory. The 19–3 victory over Florida included from Sinkwich a 22-yard touchdown run, a field goal (the first for Georgia since 1924), and another 1-yard score.

1942 All-SEC football team

The 1942 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1942 college football season. Georgia won the conference. Frank Sinkwich won the Heisman Trophy.

1942 College Football All-America Team

The 1942 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1942. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1942 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Look magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News.

Two individuals were unanimous selections; they were Georgia halfback (and Heisman Trophy winner) Frank Sinkwich and Wisconsin end Dave Schreiner.

1942 Georgia Bulldogs football team

The 1942 Georgia Bulldogs football team represented the Georgia Bulldogs of the University of Georgia during the 1942 college football season. Led by Heisman Trophy winner Frank Sinkwich, the Bulldogs compiled an 11–1 record and won the Rose Bowl. The 75–0 win over Florida is the largest margin of victory in the series history. The Bulldogs were ranked second in the final AP Poll, conducted before bowl season. While the Ohio State Buckeyes were crowned national champions by AP, Georgia was named national champion by NCAA-designated major selectors of Berryman, Billingsley, DeVold, Houlgate, Litkenhous, Poling, Sagarin, Sagarin (ELO-Chess), and Williamson. The Buckeyes did not compete in a bowl game in 1942.

1942 Orange Bowl

The 1942 Orange Bowl matched the Georgia Bulldogs and the TCU Horned Frogs.

1950 Tampa Spartans football team

The 1950 Tampa Spartans football team represented the University of Tampa in the 1950 college football season. It was the Spartans' 14th season and competed as a member of the NAIA. The team was led by head coach Frank Sinkwich, in his first year, and played their home games at Phillips Field in Tampa, Florida. They finished with a record of five wins and four losses (5–4).

On March 1, 1950, Frank Sinkwich was hired by Tampa to serve as the Spartans' head coach after the resignation of Mike Gaddis. The season opened with a victory at Camp Lejeune and a loss against Jacksonville State before the Spartans won their first home game of the season against Wofford. Tampa then won their next game over Stetson before they lost their second game of the season to Appalachian State. After a pair of home victories over Livingston State and Delta State, Tampa closed the season with a pair of road losses. The first came against Marine Corps Base Quantico and the second against Florida State.

1951 Tampa Spartans football team

The 1951 Tampa Spartans football team represented the University of Tampa in the 1951 college football season. It was the Spartans' 15th season and competed as a member of the NAIA. The team was led by head coach Frank Sinkwich, in his second year, and played their home games at Phillips Field in Tampa, Florida. They finished with a record of seven wins, three losses and one tie (7–3–1).

A week after they opened the season with a 72–0 victory over Patrick Air Force Base at home, the Spartans lost their first road game of the season at Bradley 32–6. The next Friday, Tampa lost their second consecutive game on the road. This time, Wofford overcame a 14–7 halftime deficit with a pair of third-quarter touchdowns in their 21–14 victory in Spartanburg. The Spartans then returned home and won games over Jacksonville State and Lenoir–Rhyne before they played Stetson to a 14–14 tie at DeLand after Tampa blocked a last-second field goal attempt by the Hatters. After a road loss at Appalachian State and a pair of road victories at Livingston State and South Georgia College, the Spartans returned home and played Florida State in the final home game of the season. Against the Seminoles, Tampa won in a 14–6 upset at Phillips Field before 12,500 fans.In mid-November, Tampa accepted an invitation to compete in their first postseason game against Brandeis in the first Brandeis Classic at Miami Beach. Against the Judges, the Spartans won 7–0 after they scored their only points on an 18-yard John Lahosky touchdown pass to H. L. Hiers on their opening drive. In February 1952, Sinkwich resigned as head coach of the Spartans after only two seasons and entered private business.

1952 Tampa Spartans football team

The 1952 Tampa Spartans football team represented the University of Tampa in the 1952 college football season. It was the Spartans' 16th season and competed as a member of the NAIA. The team was led by head coach Marcelino Huerta, in his first year, and played their home games at Phillips Field in Tampa, Florida. They finished with a record of eight wins, three losses and one tie (8–3–1) and with a victory in the Cigar Bowl over Lenoir–Rhyne.

After the resignation of Frank Sinkwich, on March 5, 1952, Marcelino Huerta was introduced as the Spartans' new head coach. Huerta had previously served as a line coach under Sinkwich for the 1950 and 1951 seasons after he graduated from the University of Florida.

Chaney High School

Chaney High School is a public high school in Youngstown, Ohio, United States. It is one of four secondary schools in the Youngstown City School District. Athletic teams will compete as the Chaney Cowboys and Cowgirls in the Ohio High School Athletic Association in 2018.

In 2011, Chaney High School was closed and changed into a vocal Performing Arts school as well as a STEM fields school as part of a restructure of area schools. However, in 2017, it was announced by Youngstown City School District CEO Krish Mohip that Chaney High School would be reconfigured into a traditional structure, as a part of the entire district being reconfigured into neighborhood schooling.

Clint Castleberry

Lt. Clinton Dillard Castleberry, Jr. (October 10, 1923 – November 7, 1944) was a football player in the 1940s. Georgia Tech coach Bobby Dodd said that if Castleberry had lived to finish his playing career “he’d have probably been an All-American for three years and been the greatest back in Georgia Tech history.”

George Poschner

George Poschner (Jan 15, 1919 – May 2, 2004), was a former football end who played for the University of Georgia from 1939 to 1942. During his tenure with the Bulldogs, he participated in the 1941 Orange Bowl and the 1942 Rose Bowl.

Georgia Bulldogs football statistical leaders

The Georgia Bulldogs football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Georgia Bulldogs football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, Single season and career leaders. The Bulldogs represent the University of Georgia in the NCAA's Southeastern Conference.

Although Georgia began competing in intercollegiate football in 1892, the school's official record book often does not generally include statistics from before the 1950s, as records from this era are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1950, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Bulldogs have played in a bowl game every year since this decision, giving recent players at least one extra game each year to accumulate statistics. In the 2017 season, the Bulldogs played in the College Football Playoff National Championship, giving players in that season yet another game. Similarly, the Bulldogs have played in the SEC Championship Game five times since first qualifying in 2002.

The Bulldog teams under recent head coach Mark Richt, who coached from 2001 through 2015, have had some of the highest-gaining offenses in Georgia history. All 5 of the top 5 seasons in team total offense have come under Richt.These lists are updated through Georgia's game against Austin Peay on September 1, 2018. The Georgia Football Media Guide generally does not list a full top 10 in the single-game records.

Lamar Davis

Raymond Lamar Davis (June 15, 1921 – February 23, 2014) was an American football player. He played professionally in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) with the Miami Seahawks in 1946 and the Baltimore Colts from 1947 to 1949. Davis was born in Brunswick, Georgia and attended Glynn Academy. He went to college at the University of Georgia and played for the Bulldogs from 1940 until 1942. He was a member of the 1942 Georgia team that won the Southeastern Conference (SEC) title and a national championship. His catch that season of a 65-yard touchdown pass thrown by Frank Sinkwich as final horn sounded beat Auburn. Davis was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in the second round with the 12th overall pick of the 1943 NFL Draft before they merged with the Pittsburgh Steelers to become the so-called "Steagles." Listed at 6'1" and 185 pounds, he played on offense and defense scoring numerous touchdowns as a receiver and making several interceptions as a pro. His nickname was "Racehorse". Davis resided in St. Simons Island, Georgia. He was inducted into the State of Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1990.

List of American mariners

Notable members of the United States Merchant Marine have included:

Jim Bagby, Jr., Major League Baseball pitcher

Raymond Bailey, actor

Alvin Baldus, former Democratic member of Congress

Alex Bonner, Emmy Award-winning radio and television producer

Nathaniel Bowditch, author

L. Brent Bozell, Jr., conservative activist and Catholic writer

Lenny Bruce, comedian and poet

Gordon Canfield, Republican congressman from New Jersey

Alfonso J. Cervantes, forty-third Mayor of Saint Louis, Missouri

Granville Conway, public servant, Presidential Medal for Merit recipient

Harvey Cox, preeminent theologian and professor at Harvard Divinity School

Joseph Curran, labor leader

Richard Henry Dana, Jr., author

Deborah Doane Dempsey, first American female master to command a cargo ship sailing internationally

Dan Devine, football coach

Peter Falk, actor

James Garner, actor

Allen Ginsberg, poet

Woody Guthrie, musician

David Hackworth, retired United States Army colonel and prominent military journalist

Sterling Hayden, actor and author

Sadie O. Horton, who spent World War II working aboard a coastwise U.S. Merchant Marine barge, and posthumously received official veteran’s status for her wartime service in 2017, becoming the first recorded female Merchant Marine veteran of World War II.

Cisco Houston, folk singer

Cornelius Johnson, Olympic medal-winning high jumper

Irving Johnson, author, adventurer and sail training pioneer

John Paul Jones, naval officer

Jack Kerouac, author

Joseph Stanley Kozlowski, AB, portrait and watercolor artist

Leonard LaRue, naval officer who saved 14,000 lives during the Korean War

Jack London, author

Louis L'Amour, author

Jack Lord, actor

Jerry Marcus, cartoonist of comic strip Trudy

Herman Melville, author

Hugh Mulzac, master mariner and civil rights activist

James Nachtwey, photojournalist and war photographer

George H. O'Brien, Jr., Medal of Honor recipient in Korean War

Jeremiah O'Brien, captain of the privateer Unity in the first battle of the Revolutionary War

Carroll O'Connor, actor

Jack Paar, created TV talk show; was replaced by Johnny Carson

Mary Patten (1837–1861), only woman to take command of a clipper ship after the captain was incapacitated

Richard Phillips, held hostage by pirates and later rescued

Richard Scott Prather, mystery novelist

Denver Pyle, actor

Joseph Resnick, Democratic congressman from New York

Nelson Riddle, bandleader, arranger and orchestrator

Ernie Schroeder, comic book artist

Otto Scott, journalist and author

Hubert Selby, Jr., author

Frank Sinkwich, 1942 Heisman Trophy winner

Gary Snyder, poet

Joseph D. Stewart, Vice Admiral, Superintendent of the United States Merchant Marine Academy

Montfort Stokes, Democratic Senator

Oliver Stone, three-time Academy Award-winning film director and screenwriter

Celia Sweet, first female pilot in San Diego Bay, 1912

Paul Teutul, Sr., founder of Orange County Choppers motorcycle manufacturer

Jim Thorpe, Olympic athlete

Eliza Thorrold, licensed tugboat master, San Francisco Bay, 1897

Mark Twain (born Samuel Clemens), author; inland waters

Dave Van Ronk, folk singer nicknamed the "Mayor of MacDougal Street"

Clint Walker, actor

Jack Warden, actor

John S. Watson, New Jersey politician

Ted Weems, bandleader and musician

Carlia Wescott, first American woman to be granted marine engineer's license, 1922

Haskell Wexler, Academy Award-winning cinematographer

Nedd Willard (born 1928), writer, artist, journalist

Charles Williams, writer of hardboiled crime fiction

Robin Wilson, science fiction author and editor, and former President of California State University, Chico

Charles Armijo Woodruff, 11th Governor of American Samoa

List of Detroit Lions starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Lions.

Todd Hons

Todd Hank Hons (born September 5, 1961) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League and Arena Football League. He played for the Detroit Lions and Detroit Drive. He played college football for the Arizona State Sun Devils.

Frank Sinkwich—championships, awards, and honors

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