Frank Schulte

Frank M. "Wildfire" Schulte (September 17, 1882 – October 2, 1949) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies, and Washington Senators from 1904 to 1918. He helped the Cubs win four National League (NL) championships and two World Series. In 1911, he won the NL Chalmers Award, the precursor to the Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award.

Frank Schulte
Wildfire Schulte
Schulte with the Chicago Cubs
Outfielder
Born: September 17, 1882
Cochecton, New York
Died: October 2, 1949 (aged 67)
Oakland, California
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 21, 1904, for the Chicago Cubs
Last MLB appearance
September 2, 1918, for the Washington Senators
MLB statistics
Batting average.270
Home runs92
Runs batted in792
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

Schulte was born in Cochecton, New York, in 1882 to German immigrants.[1] He played independent baseball as a teenager, despite his father's opposition to the idea. From 1902 to 1904, he played for the New York State League's Syracuse Stars. He was purchased by the Chicago Cubs in August 1904.[2]

Schulte made his major league debut for the Cubs in September 1904. He played on the Cubs teams that won National League pennants in 1906, 1907, 1908, and 1910.[2] They won the World Series in 1907 and 1908. In his four World Series appearances, Schulte had an overall batting average of .321.[3]

In 1910, Schulte led the NL with 10 home runs.[3] In 1911, he led the NL in home runs (21), runs batted in (121), and slugging percentage (.534). He also became the first player in major league history to have more than 20 doubles, triples, home runs, and stolen bases in a season. The feat would not be accomplished again until Willie Mays did it in 1957. Schulte won the 1911 NL Chalmers Award.[2]

In July 1916, Schulte was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates. His hitting declined, and he then played for the Philadelphia Phillies and Washington Senators until the 1918 season, his last as a major leaguer.[2]

Schulte played in the International League and Pacific Coast League from 1919 to 1922.[4]

Personal life

Schulte acquired his nickname, "Wildfire", after seeing a play called "Wildfire" in Mississippi. He then named one of his race horses "Wildfire" and was eventually known by that name, as well.[2]

Schulte married his wife, Mabel Kirby, in 1911.[5] He eventually settled in Oakland, California, where he died in 1949.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ [1] "...to German immigrant John Schulte"
  2. ^ a b c d e f Turner, Scott. "Frank Schulte". sabr.org. Retrieved February 1, 2013.
  3. ^ a b "Frank Schulte Statistics and History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved February 1, 2013.
  4. ^ "Frank Schulte Minor League Statistics & History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved February 1, 2013.
  5. ^ "Frank Schulte Married". Los Angeles Herald. June 27, 1911 – via California Digital Newspaper Collection.

External links

1906 Chicago Cubs season

The 1906 Chicago Cubs season was the 35th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 31st in the National League and the 14th at West Side Park. The team won the National League pennant with a record of 116–36, a full 20 games ahead of the second-place New York Giants. The team's .763 winning percentage, with two ties in their 154-game season, is the highest in modern MLB history. The 2001 Seattle Mariners also won 116 games, but they did that in 162 games with a .716 winning percentage.

In a major upset, the Cubs were beaten by the Chicago White Sox in the 1906 World Series.

1906 World Series

The 1906 World Series featured a crosstown matchup between the Chicago Cubs, who had posted the highest regular-season win total (116) and winning percentage (.763) in the major leagues since the advent of the 154-game season; and the Chicago White Sox. The White Sox, known as the "Hitless Wonders" after finishing with the worst team batting average (.230) in the American League, beat the Cubs in six games for one of the greatest upsets in Series history. This was the first World Series played by two teams from the same metropolitan area.

The teams split the first four games; then the Hitless Wonders (a name coined by sportswriter Charles Dryden) exploded for 26 hits in the last two games. True to their nickname, the White Sox hit only .198 as a team in winning the series but it beat the .196 average produced by the Cubs.

In Game 3, Ed Walsh struck out 12 Cubs, breaking the previous record of 11 set by Bill Dinneen in 1903.

The 1906 Series was the first to be played between two teams from the same city. To date, it remains the only World Series played between the two Chicago teams (In fact, it would be another 102 years before both Chicago teams would qualify for the playoffs during the same season, as this was next accomplished in 2008), and one of only two Series (the other being the 1944 World Series) played outside New York City that featured two teams from the same city (although the 1989 World Series was played between the San Francisco Giants and the Oakland Athletics, which are roughly 10 miles apart). This is also the most recent World Series where both teams were making their first appearance in the Fall Classic.

1907 Chicago Cubs season

The 1907 Chicago Cubs season was the 36th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 32nd in the National League and the 15th at West Side Park. It was the first season that the Chicago Cubs became the franchise's name officially. The team finished in first place in the National League with a record of 107–45, 17 games ahead of the Pittsburgh Pirates. It was their second straight NL pennant. The Cubs faced the Detroit Tigers in the 1907 World Series, which they won four games to none (with one tie) for their first World Series victory.

1908 Chicago Cubs season

The 1908 Chicago Cubs season was the 37th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 33rd in the National League and the 16th at West Side Park. It involved the Cubs winning their third consecutive National League pennant, as well as the World Series.

This team included four future Hall of Famers: manager / first baseman Frank Chance, second baseman Johnny Evers, shortstop Joe Tinker, and pitcher Mordecai Brown. In 1908, Brown finished second in the NL in wins and ERA. This would be the last World Series victory for the Cubs until the 2016 World Series.

1910 Chicago Cubs season

The 1910 Chicago Cubs season was the 39th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 35th in the National League and the 18th at West Side Park. The Cubs finished first in the National League with a record of 104–50, 13 games ahead of the second place New York Giants. The team was defeated four games to one by the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1910 World Series.

1911 Major League Baseball season

The 1911 Major League Baseball season was the last season in which none of the current 30 MLB stadiums were in use. The oldest current ballpark is Fenway Park, opened in 1912.

1911 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1911 throughout the world.

1911 in sports

1911 in sports describes the year's events in world sport.

1912 Chicago Cubs season

The 1912 Chicago Cubs season was the 41st season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 37th in the National League and the 20th at West Side Park. The Cubs finished third in the National League with a record of 91–59. Third baseman Heinie Zimmerman led the circuit in home runs, batting average, and slugging percentage.

20–20–20 club

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 20–20–20 club is the group of batters who have collected 20 doubles, 20 triples and 20 home runs in a single season. Frank Schulte was the first to achieve this, doing so in 1911. The last players to reach the milestone—Curtis Granderson and Jimmy Rollins—attained 20–20–20 during the 2007 season. This marked the first time that two players accomplished the achievement in the same season.

In total, only seven players are members of the 20–20–20 club. Of these, five were left-handed batters, one was right-handed and one was a switch hitter, meaning he could bat from either side of the plate. Two players—George Brett and Willie Mays—are also members of the 3,000 hit club, and Mays is also a member of the 500 home run club. Schulte, Rollins, and Jim Bottomley won the Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in the same year as their 20–20–20 season. Both Mays and Rollins joined the club while also hitting 30 home runs and stealing 30 bases that same season to join the 30–30 club. Brett and Rollins collected more than 200 hits alongside achieving 20–20–20. Furthermore, four players amassed 20 or more stolen bases during their 20–20–20 season. These players are collectively referred to as the 20–20–20–20 club.Historically, there have been numerous players who have hit 20 doubles and 20 home runs in a year. It is the component of triples, however, that makes the 20–20–20 club so difficult to achieve. This is because hitting triples often comes under a similar hit placement as doubles, but may require impressive speed on the part of the runner. This would pose a challenge for both a slugger, who may be slower at running the bases and have the tendency to hit line drives and fly balls out of the park for a home run, as well as a speedster, who may be more swift around the bases but may not supply much power to drive the ball far.

Due to the rare occurrence and low membership of the 20–20–20 club, Baseball Digest called it "the most exclusive club in the Majors" in 1979, when there were only four members. Of the five members eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame, three have been elected and two were elected on the first ballot.

Chicago Cubs award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Chicago Cubs professional baseball team.

Henry Schulte

Henry Frank Schulte (February 4, 1879 – October 18, 1944) was an American football player and coach of football, basketball, baseball, and track and field. Schulte played football at Washington University in St. Louis from 1898 to 1900 and at the University of Michigan from 1903 to 1905 and later coached football and track and field at Eastern Michigan University (1906–1908), Southeast Missouri State University (1909-1911), University of Missouri (1914–1919), and University of Nebraska (1919–1938). Schulte was often referred to by the nickname "Indian" Schulte, though he was of German rather than Native American descent.

Jack Schulte

John Herman Frank Schulte (November 15, 1881 – August 17, 1975) was a shortstop in Major League Baseball. He played for the Boston Beaneaters in 1906.

List of Chicago Cubs team records

The following lists statistical records and all-time leaders as well as awards and major accomplishments for the Chicago Cubs professional baseball club of Major League Baseball. The records list the top 5 players in each category since the inception of the Cubs.

Players that are still active with the Cubs are denoted in bold.

Records updated as of August 5, 2011.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a right fielder leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball or softball who plays defense in right field. Right field is the area of the outfield to the right of a person standing at home plate and facing towards the pitcher's mound. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the right fielder is assigned the number 9.

Harry Hooper is the all-time leader in errors committed by a right fielder with 142 career. Dave Parker is second all-time with 134 career errors at right field. Only fourteen right fielders have committed more than 100 career errors at the position.

List of Major League Baseball single-season triples leaders

Below is the list of 112 instances in which Major League Baseball players have hit 20 or more triples in a single season. Active players are in bold.

List of National League annual slugging percentage leaders

List of National League Slugging Percentage Leaders

The National League slugging percentage Leader is the Major League Baseball player in the National League who has the highest slugging percentage in a particular season.

In baseball statistics, slugging percentage' (abbreviated SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. It is calculated as total bases divided by at bats:

where AB is the number of at-bats for a given player, and 1B, 2B, 3B, and HR are the number of singles, doubles, triples, and home runs, respectively. Walks are specifically excluded from this calculation.

Currently, a player needs to accrue an average of at least 3.1 plate appearances for each game his team plays in order to qualify for the title. An exception to this qualification rule is that if a player falls short of 3.1 plate appearances per game, but would still have the highest batting average if enough hitless at-bats were added to reach the 3.1 average mark, the player still wins the slugging percentage championship.

The latest example of this exception being employed was in 2007, when Ryan Braun had a .634 slugging percentage, but only 492 plate appearances – 10 short of the 502 necessary. The addition of 10 hitless at-bats would have lowered his slugging percentage to a value that was still better than anyone else in the league, so Braun was the National League slugging percentage champion. A similar situation occurred when Tony Gwynn won the NL batting title in 1996.

Year-by-Year National League Slugging Percentage Leaders

+ Hall of Famer

A ** by the stat's value indicates the player had fewer than the required number of plate appearances for the SLG title that year. In order to rank the player, the necessary number of hitless at bats were added to the player's season total. The value here is their actual value, and not the value used to rank them.

Radio ffn

Radio ffn is a commercial radio station operated by Funk & Fernsehen Nordwestdeutschland GmbH & Co. KG in Lower Saxony, Germany. It broadcasts from regional studios in Braunschweig, Göttingen, Hanover (station HQ), Lüneburg, Oldenburg, and Osnabrück.

The station's managing director is Harald Gehrung and its program chief is Ina Tenz.

As well as transmitting on FM and satellite (DVB-S) ffn has since 2010 also been receivable via iPhone and iPad, with separate apps for each device.

Schulte Hills

Schulte Hills (73°35′S 163°50′E) is a small group of low hills lying 5 nautical miles (9 km) south-southwest of Stewart Heights in the Southern Cross Mountains, Victoria Land. Named by the southern party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1966–67, for Frank Schulte, geologist with this party.

This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Schulte Hills" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

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