Frank Malzone

Frank James Malzone (February 28, 1930 – December 29, 2015) was a Major League Baseball third baseman who played for the Boston Red Sox (1955–65) and California Angels (1966).

Frank Malzone
Frank Malzone
Third baseman
Born: February 28, 1930
Bronx, New York
Died: December 29, 2015 (aged 85)
Needham, Massachusetts
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 17, 1955, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
October 1, 1966, for the California Angels
MLB statistics
Batting average.274
Home runs133
Runs batted in728
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

Malzone spent 11 seasons with Boston and is among the all-time Red Sox leaders in several categories. He batted .276 with 131 home runs and 716 runs batted in in 1359 games. A free agent at the end of 1965, he finished up with the Angels playing 82 games in 1966.

Frank Malzone 1965
Malzone in 1965

Malzone made his Boston debut in 1955, going 6-for-10 in a doubleheader against Baltimore. In 1957, in his first full season with the Red Sox, he had a career-high 103 RBI and tied an American League record for a third baseman with 10 assists in a game. He became the first player to lead the league at his position in games played, putouts, errors, assists, double plays and fielding percentage.

Malzone led the league with 627 at-bats and hit a career-high .295 in 1958. Through 1961, he tied a record by leading AL third basemen in double plays five straight seasons. He enjoyed his best season in 1962, batting .283 with 21 home runs and 95 RBI. He was an All-Star eight times (1957, 1958, 1959* ,1960* ,1963–64; the MLB had All-Star games twice a season from 1959 to 1962) and won three straight Gold Glove Awards (1957–59), including the first Gold Glove for a third baseman in MLB history . He was the last American League third baseman to win a Gold Glove prior to Brooks Robinson's 16-year run.

In his career Malzone compiled a record of .274 BA, 133 home runs, 728 RBI, 647 runs, 239 doubles, 21 triples, and 14 stolen bases in 1,441 games. After 35 years as a Boston scout, Malzone served as a player development consultant for the Red Sox.

Malzone was inducted to the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame inaugural class in 1995.

He died on December 29, 2015.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ Frank Malzone, slugging Red Sox third baseman; at 85

External links

1956 Boston Red Sox season

The 1956 Boston Red Sox season was the 56th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 84 wins and 70 losses.

1957 Boston Red Sox season

The 1957 Boston Red Sox season was the 57th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 82 wins and 72 losses.

1958 Boston Red Sox season

The 1958 Boston Red Sox season was the 58th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 79 wins and 75 losses, thirteen games behind the AL and World Series champion New York Yankees. It would be the last time the Red Sox finished a season above .500, until their "Impossible Dream" season of 1967.

1959 Boston Red Sox season

The 1959 Boston Red Sox season was the 59th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses, nineteen games behind the AL champion Chicago White Sox.

1959 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (second game)

The 1959 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 27th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues composing Major League Baseball. The game was played on August 3, 1959, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California, home of the Los Angeles Dodgers of the NL. The game resulted in a 5–3 victory for the American League. This was the second of two All-Star Games played in 1959, the first game having been played on July 7 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The first Midsummer Classic to be played on the West Coast, this was also one of only two All-Star Games to be played outside the month of July, the other being in 1981.

1960 Boston Red Sox season

The 1960 Boston Red Sox season was the 60th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 65 wins and 89 losses, 32 games behind the AL champion New York Yankees.

1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (first game)

The 1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 28th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 1960, at Municipal Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri the home of the Kansas City Athletics of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 5–3.

A second all-star game was played two days later on July 13 at Yankee Stadium in New York City.

1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (second game)

The second 1960 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 29th playing of Major League Baseball's annual midsummer exhibition game. The game took place at Yankee Stadium in New York City, home of the American League's New York Yankees. The National League won the game by a score of 6–0. The National League hit four home runs, tying an All-Star Game record.

1961 Boston Red Sox season

The 1961 Boston Red Sox season was the 61st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished sixth in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 86 losses, 33 games behind the AL and World Series champion New York Yankees.

1962 Boston Red Sox season

The 1962 Boston Red Sox season was the 62nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished eighth in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 84 losses, 19 games behind the AL pennant winner and eventual World Series champion New York Yankees.

1963 Boston Red Sox season

The 1963 Boston Red Sox season was the 63rd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 76 wins and 85 losses, 28 games behind the AL champion New York Yankees.

1963 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1963 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 34th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 9, 1963 in Cleveland, Ohio, at Cleveland Municipal Stadium, home of the American League's Cleveland Indians. The game was won by the National League 5–3.

From 1959 to 1962, baseball experimented with a pair of All-Star Games per year. That ended with this 1963 game, which also marked the 30th anniversary of the inaugural All-Star Game played in Chicago in 1933.

1964 Boston Red Sox season

The 1964 Boston Red Sox season was the 64th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished eighth in the American League (AL) with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses, 27 games behind the AL champion New York Yankees.

1965 Boston Red Sox season

The 1965 Boston Red Sox season was the 65th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished ninth in the American League (AL) with a record of 62 wins and 100 losses, 40 games behind the AL champion Minnesota Twins, against whom the 1965 Red Sox lost 17 of 18 games. The team drew only 652,201 fans to Fenway Park, seventh in the ten-team league but the Red Sox' lowest turnstile count since 1945, the last year of World War II.

1972 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1972 followed the system established one year earlier.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected three: Yogi Berra, Sandy Koufax, and Early Wynn.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider executives, managers, umpires, and earlier major league players.

It also selected three people: Lefty Gomez, Will Harridge, and Ross Youngs.

The Negro Leagues Committee met for the second time and selected Josh Gibson and Buck Leonard.

Dave Hill (baseball)

David Burnham Hill (November 11, 1937 – October 16, 2018) was an American professional baseball player, a pitcher who appeared in two games in the Major Leagues for the 1957 Kansas City Athletics. Hill attended Northwestern University; he threw left-handed, batted right-handed, and was listed as 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and 170 pounds (77 kg).

Hill signed with the Athletics in 1957 as a Bonus Baby, under the Bonus Rule. He debuted for the A's without playing in the minor leagues on August 22 in relief against the defending world champion New York Yankees and surrendered a two-run home run to eventual Baseball Hall of Famer Yogi Berra during an 11–4 Kansas City loss. Four days later he was treated roughly by the Boston Red Sox, also in relief, surrendering five runs (including homers to Frank Malzone and Jimmy Piersall) in only one-third of an inning. Boston routed the A's, 16–0.In 2⅓ big-league innings pitched, Hill allowed six hits, three bases on balls, and seven earned runs. He fanned one.

He played in the Kansas City farm system from 1958–61, rising to the middle level of the minors, before retiring.

Hill died on October 16, 2018.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at third base

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007 and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Brooks Robinson won 16 Gold Gloves with the Baltimore Orioles, leading both the American League and all third basemen in awards won. Mike Schmidt is second in wins at third base; he won 10 with the Philadelphia Phillies and leads National League third basemen in Gold Gloves. Scott Rolen has the third-highest total, winning eight awards with the Phillies, the St. Louis Cardinals, and the Cincinnati Reds. Six-time winners at third base are Buddy Bell, Nolan Arenado, Eric Chavez, and Robin Ventura. Ken Boyer, Doug Rader, and Ron Santo have each won five Gold Gloves at third base, and four-time winners include Adrián Beltré, Gary Gaetti, and Matt Williams. Hall of Famers who have won a Gold Glove at the position include Robinson, Schmidt, Santo, Wade Boggs, and George Brett.The fewest errors committed in a third baseman's winning season is five, achieved by Boggs in 1995 and Chavez in 2006. Two National League winners have made six errors in a season to lead that league: Mike Lowell in 2005, and Schmidt in 1986. Chavez' fielding percentage of .987 in 2006 leads all winners; Lowell leads the National League with his .983 mark. Robinson leads all winners with 410 assists in 1974, and made the most putouts in the American League (174 in 1966). The most putouts by a winner was 187, made by Santo in 1967. Schmidt leads the National League in assists, with 396 in 1977. The most double plays turned in a season was 44 by Robinson in 1974; he turned at least 40 double plays during three of his winning seasons. The National League leader is Nolan Arenado with 42 in 2015Ken Boyer and Clete Boyer are the only pair of brothers to have won Gold Glove Awards at third base. Older brother Ken won five Gold Gloves in six years with the Cardinals (1958–1961, 1963), and Clete won in 1969 with the Atlanta Braves.

Oneonta Red Sox

The Oneonta Red Sox were a minor league baseball team based in Oneonta, New York.

The first incarnation of the team played in the first New York–Pennsylvania League in 1924. On August of that year, the Utica Utes relocated to Oneonta to finish their season as the Oneonta Indians. In Oneonta, the club posted an 18–22 record. However prior to the next season, the club relocated to Shamokin, Pennsylvania, to become the Shamokin Shammies.

The second incarnation of the team can be traced back to 1940 when the Can-Am League's Cornwall Maple Leafs relocated to Oneonta and played their home games at Damaschke Field. The club played until 1942 as the Oneonta Indians, winning league titles in 1941 and 1942. However the league suspended operation until 1946, due to World War II. However the team did reemerge that season as the Red Sox. Throughout its entire history the second incarnation of the club was affiliated with the Boston Red Sox.

Frank Malzone played third base for one season in Oneonta in 1949 before moving up the minor league system. The club then won two more titles, in 1948 and in the league's final season of 1951.

In 1966 a new Oneonta Red Sox team was established and played in the Class A New York–Penn League.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

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