Frank Killen

Frank Bissell "Lefty" Killen (November 30, 1870 – December 3, 1939) was a professional baseball player. He was a left-handed pitcher over parts of ten seasons (1891–1900) with the Milwaukee Brewers, Washington Senators (NL), Pittsburgh Pirates, Boston Beaneaters and Chicago Orphans.

In 1893, Killen posted a league-best 36 victories against 14 defeats. No left-hander in NL history has won as many games since then. He was the National League wins leader in 1893 and 1896 with Pittsburgh, leading the league in complete games and shutouts in 1896.

For his career, he compiled a 164–131 record in 321 appearances, with a 3.78 ERA and 725 strikeouts.

He was born and later died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, at the age of 69.

Frank Killen
Frank Killen
Pitcher
Born: November 30, 1870
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Died: December 3, 1939 (aged 69)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
August 27, 1891, for the Milwaukee Brewers
Last MLB appearance
June 27, 1900, for the Chicago Orphans
MLB statistics
Win–loss record164–131
Earned run average3.78
Strikeouts725
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1870 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1870 throughout the world.

1891 Milwaukee Brewers season

The Milwaukee Brewers were an American baseball team. They were brought into the American Association from the Western League in August 1891 to replace the Cincinnati Kelly's Killers, who had ceased operations on August 17. In their only season as a major league team, they finished with a record of 21–15, finishing with a better winning percentage than all but two teams in the AA. After the season, the American Association itself folded, as did the Brewers.

1893 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1893 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 12th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; their 7th in the National League. The Pirates finished second in the National League with a record of 81–48.

1894 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1894 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 13th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; their 8th in the National League. The Pirates finished seventh in the National League with a record of 65–65.

1895 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1895 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 14th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; their 9th in the National League. The Pirates finished seventh in the National League with a record of 71–61.

1896 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1896 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 15th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; their 10th in the National League. The Pirates finished sixth in the National League with a record of 66–63.

1897 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1897 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 16th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; their 11th in the National League. The Pirates finished eighth in the league standings with a record of 60–71. The team that season wore white and brown uniforms at home and gray and brown on the road.

1898 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1898 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 17th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; their 12th in the National League. The Pirates finished eighth in the National League with a record of 72–76.

1898 Washington Senators season

The 1898 Washington Senators season was a season in American baseball. The team finished the season with a 51–101 record, eleventh place in the National League.

1899 Boston Beaneaters season

The 1899 Boston Beaneaters season was the 29th season of the franchise.

1899 Washington Senators season

The 1899 Washington Senators baseball team finished the season with a 54–98 record, eleventh place in the National League.

The 25 home runs that right fielder Buck Freeman recorded were truly remarkable by the standards of the time; his tally was not surpassed until Babe Ruth hit 29 home runs with the 1919 Boston Red Sox.

When the NL contracted after the season, the Senators were disbanded. Owner J. Earl Wagner received $39,000 for his interest in the team.

1900 Chicago Orphans season

The 1900 Chicago Orphans season was the 29th season of the Chicago Orphans franchise, the 25th in the National League and the 8th at West Side Park. The Orphans tied with the St. Louis Cardinals for fifth in the National League with a record of 65–75.

1939 Major League Baseball season

The 1939 Major League Baseball season.

List of Major League Baseball career complete games leaders

In baseball, a complete game (denoted by CG) is the act of a pitcher pitching an entire game without the benefit of a relief pitcher. A pitcher who meets this criterion will be credited with a complete game regardless of the number of innings played - pitchers who throw an entire official game that is shortened by rain will still be credited with a complete game, while starting pitchers who are relieved in extra innings after throwing nine or more innings will not be credited with a complete game. A starting pitcher who is replaced by a pinch hitter in the final half inning of a game will still be credited with a complete game.

Cy Young is the all-time leader in complete games with 749 and the only player to complete more than 700 games. Pud Galvin is second all-time with 646 career complete games and the only other player to complete more than 600 games.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a pitcher leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the pitcher is assigned the number 1. The pitcher is often considered the most important defensive player, and as such is situated at the right end of the defensive spectrum. There are many different types of pitchers, such as the starting pitcher, relief pitcher, middle reliever, lefty specialist, setup man, and closer.

Bobby Mathews is the all-time leader committing 220 career errors as a pitcher. Mathews is the only pitcher to commit more than 200 career errors at the position. Tim Keefe is second all-time with 166 career errors as a pitcher. A total of seventeen pitchers all-time have committed more than 100 career errors at the position.

List of Pittsburgh Pirates Opening Day starting pitchers

The Pittsburgh Pirates are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They play in the National League Central division. Originally known as the Alleghenys, they played in the American Association from 1882 through 1886, and have played in the National League since 1887. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Pirates have used 71 Opening Day starting pitchers since they began to play as a Major League team in 1882. The Pirates have a record of 69 wins and 60 losses in their Opening Day games.The Pirates have played in several different home ball parks. Between 1882 and 1909 they played in two parks called Exposition Park and in Recreation Park. They played in Forbes Field from 1909 to 1970 and Three Rivers Stadium from 1970 to 2000 and they have played in their current stadium, PNC Park, since 2001. They had a record of no wins and one loss in the first Exposition Park, four wins and no losses in Recreation Park and no wins and two losses in the second Exposition Park. They had a record of four wins and two losses at Forbes Field and a record of five wins and eight losses at Three Rivers Stadium. Through 2010, they have a record of two wins and one loss at PNC Park. That gives the Pirates an overall Opening Day record of 15 wins and 14 losses at home. They have a record of 54 wins and 46 losses in Opening Day games on the road.Bob Friend has made the most Opening Day starts for the Pirates, with seven. Babe Adams and Frank Killen each made five Opening Day starts for the Pirates, and Deacon Phillippe, Howie Camnitz, Cy Blanton and Bob Veale each made four Opening Day starts. Ed Morris, Pud Galvin, Wilbur Cooper, Ray Kremer, Rip Sewell, Steve Blass, Dock Ellis, Rick Rhoden, Doug Drabek and Francisco Liriano all made three Opening Day starts for the Pirates. Several Pittsburgh Pirates Opening Day starting pitchers have been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, including Galvin, Burleigh Grimes, Waite Hoyt, Jim Bunning, and Bert Blyleven. Bunning was elected as both a United States congressman and senator from Kentucky after retiring from baseball.The Pirates have won nine National League titles, in 1901, 1902, 1903, 1909, 1925, 1927, 1960, 1971 and 1979. They went on to win the World Series in 1909, 1925, 1960, 1971 and 1979 (the modern World Series begin in 1903). Sam Leever was the Pirates Opening Day starting pitcher in 1901, Phillippe was the Opening Day starting pitcher in both 1902 and 1903, Camnitz was the Opening Day starting pitcher in 1909, Emil Yde in 1925, Kremer in 1927, Friend in 1960, Ellis in 1971 and Blyleven in 1979.

Max Surkont

Matthew Constantine Surkont (June 16, 1922 – October 8, 1986) was an American professional baseball pitcher who played from 1949 through 1957 in the Major Leagues. He played for the Chicago White Sox, Boston Braves, Milwaukee Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, and New York Giants. The nickname Max was given to him by his childhood friends.

Sharon Giants

The Sharon Giants was the predominant name of a minor league baseball team based in Sharon, Pennsylvania that existed between 1905 and 1912. The team played all of its seasons in the Ohio–Pennsylvania League.

The team was first established in 1905 as the Sharon Steels and managed by Frank Killen, a former pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Washington Senators. By 1907 the team was renamed the Sharon Giants for the 1907 and 1908 seasons, before folding.

On August 12, 1911, the New Castle Nocks, of the Ohio–Pennsylvania League, moved to Sharon where they were renamed the Sharon Travelers. The club finished last at 35-101-1. In 1912 they were renamed the Sharon Giants. However the team soon moved to Bridgeport, Ohio on August 10, 1912 and were renamed the Bridgeport Giants. The team then folded at the end of the season.

Washington Senators (1891–1899) all-time roster

The following is a list of players and who appeared in at least one game for the Washington Senators franchise of Major League Baseball, which played as the Washington Statesmen in the American Association in 1891 and as the Senators in the National League from 1892 until 1899. Players in bold are in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

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