Frank Kaminsky

Francis Stanley Kaminsky III[1] (born April 4, 1993) is an American professional basketball player for the Charlotte Hornets of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He previously played four years of college basketball for the Wisconsin Badgers, where he set the Wisconsin single-game record for points (43).[2][3] He was the unanimous men's National College Player of the Year in 2015.

Frank Kaminsky
Frank Kaminsky 2012
Kaminsky in 2012
No. 44 – Charlotte Hornets
PositionPower forward / Center
LeagueNBA
Personal information
BornApril 4, 1993 (age 26)
Winfield, Illinois
NationalityAmerican
Listed height7 ft 0 in (2.13 m)
Listed weight242 lb (110 kg)
Career information
High schoolBenet Academy (Lisle, Illinois)
CollegeWisconsin (2011–2015)
NBA draft2015 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9th overall
Selected by the Charlotte Hornets
Playing career2015–present
Career history
2015–presentCharlotte Hornets
Career highlights and awards
Stats at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Early life and high school career

Kaminsky's father, Frank Jr., played basketball at Lewis University. His mother, Mary, played volleyball at Northwestern.[4] Kaminsky, who is of Serbian ancestry,[5] grew up in Woodridge, Illinois.[6] In 1998, when he was 5 years old, his aunt and uncle worked for the Chicago Bulls and he had access to the practice facility when Michael Jordan, Dennis Rodman and Randy Brown were on the team.[7]

Kaminsky attended Benet Academy in Lisle, Illinois. He was named first-team all-state by the Chicago Sun-Times and IBCA and second-team all-state by the AP after averaging 14.2 points, 8.7 rebounds, 4.2 blocks and 2.8 assists during his senior season. He led the Redwings to a 29-1 season after being defeated in the Sectional Semifinals by the East Aurora Tomcats that were led by Connecticut Huskies superstar and National Champion Ryan Boatright. He was also named all-area, all-conference and East Suburban Catholic Conference Player of the Year. Kaminsky's jersey number, 44, was retired in a ceremony at Benet Academy on November 18, 2017.[8]

College career

Freshman season

Kaminsky played in 35 of 36 games as a freshman. He scored a season-high nine points against UMKC on November 22, 2011.

Sophomore season

Kaminsky played in 32 games, starting the first two games of the season. He finished the season averaging 4.2 points and 1.8 rebounds per game. He led the team in free-throw percentage at 76.7%. He posted a season-high 19 points at Illinois on February 3, 2013.

Junior season

On November 19, 2013, Kaminsky broke the Wisconsin single-game scoring record with 43 points against North Dakota.[9] Kaminsky shot 16 of 19 from the field, including six of six from 3-point range and five of six from the free throw line. The previous Wisconsin single-game record was 42 points, set by Ken Barnes (vs. Indiana on March 8, 1965) and Michael Finley (vs. Eastern Michigan on December 10, 1994).

At the conclusion of the regular season, Kaminsky was named to the First Team All-Big Ten.[10]

On March 29, 2014, Kaminsky scored 28 points and had 11 rebounds as Wisconsin defeated #1 seeded Arizona 64–63 in overtime during the NCAA Tournament to advance to the Final Four. After the game, Kaminsky was named West Regional Most Outstanding Player.[11]

Senior season

Ahead of the 2014 season, Kaminsky was named the Big Ten preseason player of the year.[12] The Badgers were unanimously picked to win the Big Ten Championship.[13]

The Badgers and Kaminsky validated those predictions. The Badgers had a 36-3 record in games Kaminsky played. They won the Big Ten regular season title with a 16-2 record and the Big Ten tournament title. After becoming the first NCAA tournament 1-seed in school history, they made their way to their second consecutive Final Four. There, they avenged their previous season's loss to Kentucky, upsetting the 38-0 Wildcats 71-64 behind Kaminsky's 20 points and 11 rebounds.[14] In the Badgers' first national championship game in 74 years, they lost a 9-point second-half lead and were defeated 68-63 by the Duke Blue Devils. Kaminsky finished with 21 points and 12 rebounds. For the season, he finished with 18.8 PPG and 8.2 RPG, despite playing for a team that ranked 346th out of 351 in adjusted tempo. He led the nation in PER, an efficiency-based stat. Wisconsin boasted the highest adjusted offensive efficiency in KenPom history.

Kaminsky was named consensus first-team All-American.[15] On March 31, 2015, he was named the National Association of Basketball Coaches Player of the Year.[16] On April 3 he was named Associated Press College Basketball Player of the Year, the first Wisconsin player to receive the award since its creation in 1961.[17] He also received the Oscar Robertson Trophy as the United States Basketball Writers Association College Player of the Year.[18] On April 5, he was named the Naismith College Player of the Year.[19] On April 10, he won both the John R. Wooden Award and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Center of the Year Award.[20] On June 12 Kaminsky was named University of Wisconsin's Male Athlete of the Year.[21]

Professional career

Charlotte Hornets (2015–present)

On June 25, 2015, Kaminsky was selected with the ninth overall pick by the Charlotte Hornets in the 2015 NBA draft.[22] On December 2, he scored 16 points in a 116–99 loss to the Golden State Warriors, earning increased minutes with starting center Al Jefferson out injured.[23] On December 23, he scored a career-high 23 points in a 102–89 loss to the Boston Celtics.[24] On December 30, he had his second 20-point outing of the season in a 122–117 loss to the Los Angeles Clippers.[25] On April 10, 2016, he recorded 18 points and a career-high 11 rebounds in a 113–98 loss to the Washington Wizards.[26] In Game 3 of the Hornets' first-round playoff series against the Miami Heat, Kaminsky scored 15 points in a 96–80 win.[27]

On November 21, 2016, Kaminsky tied a career high with 23 points on 9-of-11 shooting in a 105–90 loss to the Memphis Grizzlies.[28] On February 1, 2017, he set a new career high with 24 points off the bench in a 126–111 loss to the Golden State Warriors.[29] He topped that mark on February 15, scoring 27 points in a 90–85 loss to the Toronto Raptors.[30] On February 25, he recorded 23 points and a career-high 13 rebounds in a 99–85 win over the Sacramento Kings.[31]

On November 20, 2017, Kaminsky scored a season-high 24 points in a 118–102 win over the Minnesota Timberwolves.[32] On December 18, he scored 24 points in a 109–91 win over the New York Knicks.[33] On April 10, 2018, he scored 24 points in a 119–93 win over the Indiana Pacers.[34]

On November 21, 2018, after scoring just nine points over the Hornets' first 16 games of the 2018–19 season, Kaminsky had 11 points off the bench in a 127–109 win over the Pacers.[35] He lost his spot in the rotation in 2018–19 under new coach James Borrego, appearing in just 26 games at the conclusion of February.[36] On March 1, 2019, he was inserted into the rotation to combat zone defense with his passing ability, going on to score 15 points in a 123–112 win over the Brooklyn Nets.[36] On April 5, he recorded 22 points and 13 rebounds in a 113–111 win over the Raptors.[37] Two days later, he scored a season-high 24 points in a 104–91 win over the Detroit Pistons.[38]

Career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

NBA

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2015–16 Charlotte 81 3 21.1 .410 .337 .730 4.1 1.2 .5 .5 7.5
2016–17 Charlotte 75 16 26.1 .399 .328 .756 4.5 2.2 .6 .5 11.7
2017–18 Charlotte 79 4 23.2 .429 .380 .799 3.6 1.6 .5 .2 11.1
2018–19 Charlotte 47 0 16.1 .463 .360 .738 3.5 1.3 .3 .3 8.6
Career 282 23 22.2 .419 .349 .760 4.0 1.6 .5 .4 9.8

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2016 Charlotte 7 5 27.1 .304 .294 .810 4.3 1.1 .9 .7 7.1
Career 7 5 27.1 .304 .294 .810 4.3 1.1 .9 .7 7.1

College

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2011–12 Wisconsin 35 0 7.7 .411 .286 .500 1.4 .3 .1 .4 1.8
2012–13 Wisconsin 32 2 10.3 .439 .311 .767 1.8 .8 .4 .5 4.2
2013–14 Wisconsin 38 38 27.2 .528 .378 .765 6.3 1.3 .7 1.7 13.9
2014–15 Wisconsin 39 39 33.6 .547 .416 .780 8.2 2.6 .8 1.5 18.8
Career 144 79 20.4 .522 .369 .763 4.6 1.3 .5 1.1 10.1

References

  1. ^ Torre, Pablo S. (November 5, 2014). "Wisconsin Badgers big man Frank Kaminsky is back for senior season". ESPN The Magazine.
  2. ^ "Wisconsin's Frank Kaminsky nets school record 43 points in rout". USA Today. Associated Press. November 19, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  3. ^ Bergeron, Elena (December 27, 2013). "Three and change". ESPN. Retrieved June 26, 2015.
  4. ^ "Frank Kaminsky Bio". uwbadgers.com. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  5. ^ Alongside Local Legends, Kaminsky Ventures to Basketball-Crazed Serbia
  6. ^ Wisconsin Badgers' Frank Kaminsky's Childhood Home Hits the Market - Woodridge, IL Patch Retrieved 2017-02-19.
  7. ^ "Frank Kaminsky: Badgers to be great". ESPN. May 1, 2014. Retrieved May 1, 2014.
  8. ^ Baumgartner, Blake. "Homecoming king: Frank Kaminsky returns to Benet for banner raising". Naperville Sun. Retrieved 2017-11-19.
  9. ^ "School Record 43 points from Frank Kaminsky power UW past North Dakota". Madison.com. Retrieved December 26, 2013.
  10. ^ "Big Ten Announces 2014 Men's Basketball Postseason Honors: Michigan's Stauskas named Big Ten Player of the Year". BigTen.org. CBS Interactive. March 10, 2014. Retrieved March 10, 2014.
  11. ^ Schnell, Lindsay (April 2, 2014). "In a family of athletes, Frank Kaminsky Jr. finally finds his moment". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on April 5, 2014. Retrieved April 3, 2014.
  12. ^ Potrykus, Jeff (October 16, 2014). "Frank Kaminsky named Big Ten preseason player of the year". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
  13. ^ Temple, Jesse (October 16, 2014). "Wisconsin Badgers unanimous pick to win Big Ten basketball title". FOX Sports.
  14. ^ "Wisconsin stuns Kentucky, moves on to title game". SBNation.com. Retrieved 2017-08-29.
  15. ^ "AP honor makes Kaminsky a consensus All-American". uwbadgers.com. March 30, 2015.
  16. ^ "Kaminsky Named NABC POY". Big Ten Conference. March 31, 2015.
  17. ^ "Wisconsin's Frank Kaminsky chosen AP Player of the Year". Indianapolis Star. Associated Press. April 3, 2015.
  18. ^ Frank Kaminsky Wins 2015 Oscar Robertson, Associated Press Player of Year Awards. Bleacher Report (2015-04-03). Retrieved on 2015-11-07.
  19. ^ Frank Kaminsky Named 2015 Naismith Men's College Player of the Year. Bleacher Report. Retrieved on 2015-11-07.
  20. ^ "Kaminsky adds more hardware, wins Center of Year award". Fox Sports. April 10, 2015.
  21. ^ "Kaminsky, Martin named UW's Athletes of the Year". uwbadgers.com. June 12, 2015.
  22. ^ "Hornets Select Frank Kaminsky with No. 9 Pick in 2015 NBA Draft". NBA.com. June 25, 2015. Retrieved June 26, 2015.
  23. ^ Curry scores 40, Warriors top Hornets 116-99 to go 20-0
  24. ^ Olynyk scores 20 as Celtics hold off Hornets, win
  25. ^ Frank Kaminsky 2015-16 Game Log
  26. ^ Gortat scores 21 points as Wizards upset Hornets, 113-98
  27. ^ Hornets snap 14-year playoff drought, beat Heat 96-80
  28. ^ Conley, Grizzlies top Hornets 105-90 for 5th straight win
  29. ^ Stephen Curry's 3-point clinic leads Warriors past Hornets
  30. ^ Hornets' Frank Kaminsky sets new career-high in scoring
  31. ^ Frank Kaminsky 2016-17 Game Log
  32. ^ Frank Kaminsky 2017-18 Game Log
  33. ^ Kaminsky ties season high with 24, Hornets top Knicks 109-91
  34. ^ Hornets take advantage of resting Pacers for 119-93 win
  35. ^ "Lamb scores 21, Hornets topple Pacers 127-109". ESPN.com. November 21, 2018. Retrieved November 21, 2018.
  36. ^ a b "Hornets end skid at 3, roll to 123-112 victory over Nets". ESPN.com. March 1, 2019. Retrieved March 2, 2019.
  37. ^ "Lamb hits 3-point winner, Hornets beat Raptors 113-111". ESPN.com. April 5, 2019. Retrieved April 8, 2019.
  38. ^ "Walker-led Hornets top Pistons 104-91, holding playoff hopes". ESPN.com. April 7, 2019. Retrieved April 8, 2019.

External links

2013–14 Big Ten Conference men's basketball season

The 2013–14 Big Ten men's basketball season began with practices in October 2013, followed by the start of the 2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season in November. Michigan won the regular season title, but lost to Michigan State in the championship game of the 2014 Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Tournament.

Following the season 9 teams participated in post season tournaments. Six teams were invited to participate in the 2014 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament; two teams were selected for the 2014 National Invitation Tournament and one team competed in the 2014 College Basketball Invitational. The conference posted a 17–7 record in postseason tournaments. Wisconsin reached the final four of the NCAA Tournament and Minnesota won the NIT Tournament.

Nik Stauskas was the Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year and a 2014 Consensus All-American. Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year Aaron Craft was named the NABC Defensive Player of the Year and Men's Basketball Academic All-American of the Year.

The conference had 7 selections in the 2014 NBA draft, including 5 in the first round: Nik Stauskas (8th), Noah Vonleh (9th), Adreian Payne (15th), Gary Harris (19th), Mitch McGary (21st), Glenn Robinson III (40th), and Roy Devyn Marble (56th).

2013–14 Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball team

The 2013–14 Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball team represented the University of Wisconsin–Madison in the 2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. This was Bo Ryan's 12th season as head coach at Wisconsin. The team played their home games at the Kohl Center in Madison, Wisconsin and were members of the Big Ten Conference. They finished the season 30–8, 12–6 in Big Ten play to finish in a tie for second place. They lost in the semifinals in the Big Ten Tournament to Michigan State. They received at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament as a No. 2 seed in the West region, their 16th straight trip to the Tournament. They defeated American and Oregon to advance to the Sweet Sixteen. They defeated Baylor and Arizona to advance to the Final Four. However, they were eliminated by Kentucky in the Final Four.

2014–15 Big Ten Conference men's basketball season

The 2014–15 Big Ten men's basketball season began with practices in October 2014, followed by the start of the 2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season in November. It marked the first season for Rutgers and Maryland in the Big Ten Conference. Wisconsin won the regular season title and the 2015 Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Tournament.

Following the season, eight teams participated in post-season tournaments. Seven teams were invited to participate in the 2015 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, and one team was selected for the 2015 National Invitation Tournament. The conference achieved a 12–7 record in the NCAA tournament and a 12–8 overall postseason record. The postseason was highlighted by Wisconsin's NCAA tournament championship game appearance and Michigan State's final four appearance.

Frank Kaminsky earned several national player of the year awards and was the Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year. He and D'Angelo Russell received 2014 All-American first team recognition and Melo Trimble earned second team recognition. Russell and Trimble were both 2015 USBWA Freshman All-America Team selections. Kaminsky and Russell were the inaugural Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Award and Jerry West Award winners, respectively. Shavon Shields and Mike Gesell were Academic All-America selections.

Following the season, the conference had 5 selections in the 2015 NBA draft, including 3 in the first round: Russell (2nd), Kaminsky (9th), Sam Dekker (18th), Aaron White (49th), and Branden Dawson (56th). International player, Caleb Swanigan won a gold medal with Team USA at the 2015 FIBA Under-19 World Championship, while Trimble and Denzel Valentine won bronze medals at the 2015 Pan American Games.

2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season

The 2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season began in November with the 2K Sports Classic and ended with the Final Four in Indianapolis April 4–6. Practices officially began on October 3.

2014–15 Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball team

The 2014–15 Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball team represented the University of Wisconsin–Madison in the 2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. This was Bo Ryan's 14th and final full season as head coach at Wisconsin. The team played their home games at the Kohl Center in Madison, Wisconsin and were members of the Big Ten Conference.They finished the season 36–4, 16–2 in Big Ten play to win the Big Ten regular season championship. They defeated Michigan, Purdue, and Michigan State to win the Big Ten Tournament and earn an automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament. This marked the Badgers' 17th straight trip to the Tournament. In the Tournament, they defeated Coastal Carolina and Oregon to advance to their second straight Sweet Sixteen. They defeated North Carolina and Arizona to reach the school's fourth overall and second consecutive Final Four. By upsetting unbeaten Kentucky 71–64 in the Final Four in Indianapolis, the Badgers moved on to play Duke in the National Championship Game, going for their first title in 74 years. However, Wisconsin lost the game 68–63.

2015 Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2015 Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Tournament was held from March 11 through March 15 at United Center in Chicago, Illinois. This was the 16th annual Big Ten Tournament and was the first tournament to feature 14 teams of the expanded Big Ten to include Maryland and Rutgers. The championship was won by Wisconsin who defeated Michigan State in the championship game. As a result, Wisconsin received the Big Ten's automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament. The win marked Wisconsin's third tournament championship and first since 2008.

2015 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship Game

The 2015 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship Game was the final game of the 2015 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament, determining the national champion for the 2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The game was played on April 6, 2015, at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana between the 2015 South regional champions, first-seeded Duke and the 2015 West regional champions, first-seeded Wisconsin.

The first half of the national championship game was tightly contested, with neither team leading by more than six points. At halftime, the score was tied at 31. Wisconsin scored first in the second half, and slowly built the lead as high as nine points. However, Duke fought back, and tied the score at 54 with 7 minutes to go. Duke took the lead for the first time in the second half with 5:30 remaining, but the game remained tight. With 3:30 remaining, Duke held a one-point lead, when Jahlil Okafor re-entered the game after sitting most of the second half in foul trouble. He scored on back to back possessions, giving Duke a 63–58 lead. After that, the closest Wisconsin got was 66–63 with 45 seconds left. Duke hit two foul shots and Wisconsin did not score again for a 68–63 final margin. The win gave Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski his fifth title, putting him in second place all-time for Division I Men's Basketball Titles.

2015 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. The 2015 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans are honorary lists that include All-American selections from the Associated Press (AP), the United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA), the Sporting News (TSN), and the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) for the 2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. All selectors choose at least a first and second 5-man team. The NABC, TSN and AP choose third teams, while AP also lists honorable mention selections.

The Consensus 2015 College Basketball All-American team is determined by aggregating the results of the four major All-American teams as determined by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since United Press International was replaced by TSN in 1997, the four major selectors have been the aforementioned ones. AP has been a selector since 1948, NABC since 1957 and USBWA since 1960. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors based on a point system computed from the four different all-America teams. The point system consists of three points for first team, two points for second team and one point for third team. No honorable mention or fourth team or lower are used in the computation. The top five totals plus ties are first team and the next five plus ties are second team.Although the aforementioned lists are used to determine consensus honors, there are numerous other All-American lists. The ten finalists for the John Wooden Award are described as Wooden All-Americans. The ten finalists for the Senior CLASS Award are described as Senior All-Americans. Other All-American lists include those determined by USA Today, Fox Sports, and Yahoo! Sports. The scholar-athletes selected by College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) are termed Academic All-Americans.

2015–16 Charlotte Hornets season

The 2015–16 Charlotte Hornets season was the 26th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and the fourth season under head coach Steve Clifford. With 48–34 record, the Hornets qualified for the playoffs for the tenth time in Charlotte pro basketball history as a sixth seed, where they played the third-seeded Miami Heat. In a tight playoff match, the Hornets lost the first two games in Miami, before winning three straight. Miami took games 6 and 7, winning the series.

As of 2019, this marked the last season the Hornets made the playoffs.

2016–17 Charlotte Hornets season

The 2016–17 Charlotte Hornets season was the 27th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and the fourth season under head coach Steve Clifford.

2017–18 Charlotte Hornets season

The 2017–18 Charlotte Hornets season was the 28th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and the fifth season under head coach Steve Clifford. It was also the last season where Rich Cho is the general manager for the Hornets and the last where Steve Clifford is the head coach, as well as Mitch Kupchak's first year with Charlotte.

On March 28, 2018 against the Cleveland Cavaliers, Kemba Walker surpassed Dell Curry to become the franchise's all-time leader in points. The Hornets equaled their record from last season and went on to miss playoff contention for the second straight season.

On April 8, 2018, Kupchak was hired as the president of basketball operations and general manager of the Charlotte Hornets.On April 13, 2018, the Hornets' president of basketball operations and general manager Kupchak announced that the team had relieved Steve Clifford of his head coaching duties.

Adolph Rupp Trophy

The Adolph F. Rupp Trophy was an award given annually to the top player in men's Division I NCAA basketball until 2015. The recipient of the award was selected by an independent panel consisting of national sportswriters, coaches, and sports administrators. The trophy was presented each year at the site of the Final Four of the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship.The Adolph F. Rupp Trophy was administered by the Commonwealth Athletic Club of Kentucky, a non-profit organization with a primary mission of honoring the legacy of University of Kentucky coach Adolph Rupp. Three winners of the award have been freshmen: Kevin Durant of Texas in 2007, John Wall of Kentucky in 2010 and Anthony Davis of Kentucky in 2012.

Barstool Sports

Barstool Sports is a sports and pop culture blog founded by Dave Portnoy in Milton, Massachusetts. The site, which has been owned since 2016 by The Chernin Group, a media holding company, is currently headquartered at 333 7th Avenue, New York City.

Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year is a basketball award given to the Big Ten Conference's most outstanding player. The award was first given following the 1984–85 season. Only two players have won the award multiple times: Jim Jackson of Ohio State (1991, 1992) and Mateen Cleaves of Michigan State (1998, 1999). Eight players who won the Big Ten Player of the Year award were also named the national player of the year by one or more major voting bodies: Jim Jackson (1992), Calbert Cheaney of Indiana (1993), Glenn Robinson of Purdue (1994), Evan Turner of Ohio State (2010), Trey Burke of Michigan 2013, Draymond Green of Michigan State (2012), Frank Kaminsky of Wisconsin (2015), and Denzel Valentine of Michigan State (2016).

Michigan State has the record for the most winners with nine. Of current Big Ten Conference members, six schools have never had a winner: Iowa, Maryland, Nebraska, Northwestern, Penn State, and Rutgers. Of these, only Iowa and Northwestern were in the conference since the inception of this award—Penn State joined the Big Ten in 1991, Nebraska joined in 2011, followed by Maryland and Rutgers in 2014.

I'm Still Here (Desperate Housewives)

"I'm Still Here" is the 147th episode of the ABC television series, Desperate Housewives. It is the thirteenth episode of the show's seventh season and was broadcast on January 16, 2011.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Award

The Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Center of the Year Award is an annual basketball award given by the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame to the top men's collegiate center. Following the success of the Bob Cousy Award which had been awarded since 2004, the award was one of four new awards (along with the Jerry West Award, Julius Erving Award and Karl Malone Award) created as part of the inaugural College Basketball Awards show in 2015. It is named after three-time NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Champion, three-time NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player, and three-time National Player of the Year Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. The inaugural winner was Frank Kaminsky.

List of Benet Academy alumni

Benet Academy (often shortened to "Benet") is a co-educational, college-preparatory, Benedictine high school in Lisle, Illinois, United States, overseen by the Diocese of Joliet. Since its founding in 1887, notable alumni have included Olympic athletes, professional American football players, winners of Grammy and Academy Awards, and a former Illinois Attorney General.

An alumni directory compiled in 1937 reveals that older alumni have included members of the clergy, businessmen, physicians, educators, attorneys, musicians, and journalists. For the 2010–11 school year, 1,333 students were enrolled at Benet.Most students come from Lisle, Downers Grove, and Naperville, but students expected to graduate in 2013 come from 65 different schools and 34 different municipalities in DuPage and surrounding counties.Admission is competitive and primarily based on the High School Placement Test, a standardized test by Scholastic Testing Service, taken in January of applicants' eighth grade year (around age 13). The Chicago Sun-Times ranked Benet one of the top ten high schools in the Chicago area in 2003, and in 1999 Benet was one of two high schools in DuPage County, and 100 high schools nationwide, featured as an "Outstanding American High School" by U.S. News & World Report.Formerly known as the all-boys St. Procopius College and Academy, the school began to offer a remedial course, or a course designed to bring underprepared students to competency, to only two students on March 2, 1887. Enrollment grew to 30 high school students by 1947. The academy began to operate independently from the college in 1957. The all-girls Sacred Heart Academy, founded in 1926, operated nearby. Due to dwindling enrollment and funding, St. Procopius Academy and Sacred Heart Academy merged in 1967 to form Benet Academy.

List of U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards

This article lists U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards. Several different organizations sponsor an award for the nation's top player.

Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball

The Wisconsin Badgers is a NCAA Division I college basketball team competing in the Big Ten Conference. The Badgers home games are played at the Kohl Center, located on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus in Madison, Wisconsin.Wisconsin has 1618 wins through the end of the 2018-19 season which is top 50 all-time in wins in college basketball.

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