Frank Herbert's Children of Dune

Frank Herbert's Children of Dune is a three-part science fiction miniseries written by John Harrison and directed by Greg Yaitanes, based on Frank Herbert's novels Dune Messiah (1969) and Children of Dune (1976). First broadcast in the United States on March 16, 2003, Children of Dune is the sequel to the 2000 miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune (based on Herbert's 1965 novel Dune), and was produced by the Sci Fi Channel. Children of Dune and its predecessor are two of the three highest-rated programs ever to be broadcast on the Sci-Fi Channel. In 2003, Children of Dune won a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Special Visual Effects, and was nominated for three additional Emmys.

Frank Herbert's Children of Dune
Children of Dune 1
DVD cover
Based onDune Messiah and Children of Dune
by Frank Herbert
Screenplay byJohn Harrison
Story byFrank Herbert
Directed byGreg Yaitanes
Starring
Music byBrian Tyler
Original language(s)English
Production
CinematographyArthur Reinhart
Running time266 minutes
Budget$20 million [1]
Release
Original networkSci Fi Channel
Picture formatColor
Audio formatDolby Digital
Original releaseMarch 16 –
March 26, 2003
Chronology
Preceded byFrank Herbert's Dune

Plot

Part One: Messiah

Twelve years have passed since Paul Atreides had become Emperor at the end of Frank Herbert's Dune by seizing control of the planet Arrakis and forcing a union with the former Emperor's daughter, the Princess Irulan. Paul's Fremen armies have since launched several bloody jihads to solidify his position. Deposed Emperor Shaddam IV and the rest of his family are exiled to Salusa Secundus, where his other daughter Princess Wensicia plots to restore House Corrino to power. The Bene Gesserit, the Spacing Guild, and the Tleilaxu also plot to overthrow Paul's reign, aided even by rebel Fremen, who hate how Paul's terraforming project is changing Arrakis and the traditional Fremen way of life. The Tleilaxu present Paul with a ghola in the likeness of his friend Duncan Idaho, killed during the events of Dune, but secretly conditioned to assassinate Paul when triggered by certain words.

Though his prescient abilities reveal the dangers ahead, Paul allows the conspiracies to succeed to avoid even worse consequences. He is attacked with a type of nuclear weapon called a stone burner and blinded, but still manages to "see" by following his prescient visions. Later, Paul's concubine Chani gives birth to twins at a Fremen sietch but dies soon afterward. In Paul's absence, his sister Alia purges the imperial city of the enemies of House Atreides. Meanwhile, the Tleilaxu Face Dancer Scytale triggers Duncan's conditioning; but the trauma of potentially killing Paul breaks his programming, and unlocks the memories of his original incarnation. His plan foiled, Scytale threatens the lives of Paul's children; whereupon the unique nature of the infants (who, like Alia, were "pre-born") allows Paul to see through the eyes of his son and kill Scytale. Following the Fremen tradition of abandoning the blind to the sandworms, Paul walks alone into the desert. His legacy secured, the twins and their future empire are now left in the care of Alia.

Part Two: The Children

Paul's and Chani's children Leto II and Ghanima are now young adults; Princess Irulan has protected their interests as her own. Now married to Duncan, Alia is still regent of Paul's empire and official guardian of the children. Irulan's sister Wensicia yearns for a return to power through her son, Farad'n. After a long absence, Paul and Alia's mother Lady Jessica arrives on Arrakis to visit her family, but Alia fears that Jessica has resumed her allegiance to the Bene Gesserit and may be plotting against her. An individual known as "The Preacher" has surfaced in the capital, speaking against the decline of Muad'Dib's religion into fear and ritualism; but Alia resists having him killed because she shares the popular belief that he may be a returned Paul.

Alia possesses the memories and personalities of her ancestors due to being pre-born, but has trouble controlling them; her internal struggles against the assertive voices manifest themselves in the form of paranoia and self-destructive behavior. The persona of the evil Baron Vladimir Harkonnen, Alia's maternal grandfather whom she had herself killed, begins to influence her, and threatens to overtake Alia's consciousness altogether. Jessica senses that Alia has become dangerous, and advises Irulan to spirit Leto and Ghanima away to safety. Later, after an assassination attempt on her, Jessica seeks sanctuary with Fremen dissidents. Wearing clothes presented to them by Wensicia, the twins escape into the deep desert but are soon cornered in a deadly trap of her devising.

Part Three: The Golden Path

Wensicia's plot to assassinate the Atreides heirs fails, but provides Leto an opportunity to fake his own death and buy time to overcome Alia. Alia's madness reaches its peak as Baron Harkonnen's grip on her consciousness strengthens and a civil war brews with the rebel Fremen. Leto returns from the deep desert, where he bonds himself with sandtrout — the larval form of Arrakis' sandworms — to acquire a partial carapace granting the superhuman speed, strength, and invulnerability of the sandworms themselves.

As a means of forcing as-yet-neutral Fremen leader Stilgar to lead the rebels, Duncan murders Alia's lover Javid in Stilgar's sietch. As he predicts, Stilgar kills him in revenge and comes out in active opposition to Alia. Leto encounters the Preacher, whose identity as his father is revealed. Leto's prescient visions have convinced him that he must lead mankind along "the Golden Path" to ensure humanity's ultimate survival. While the Preacher is dismayed at his son's choice, Leto is vindicated by pointing out how Muad'dib's prescience also saw the steps needed to ensure humanity's future.

With a political marriage arranged by Jessica between Ghanima and Wensicia's son Farad'n, the Corrino heir identifies his mother as the mastermind behind Leto's apparent death. Alia has Wensicia imprisoned, but Ghanima accepts Farad'n's gesture as honest. With Stilgar's forces moving in, father and son return to the capital city of Arrakeen, where the Preacher makes a final speech denouncing Alia and his own religion, and is fatally stabbed by a rebel Fremen. Leto confronts Alia at Ghanima's wedding and defeats her. Alia then commits suicide rather than be controlled by the Baron and dies in her mother's arms. After handing Alia's water and his father's ring to Stilgar, Leto disappears into the desert. In the final scene, Ghanima tells Farad'n that while he will not be her husband due to politics, they may yet fall in love, and how she pities her brother for the solitude and suffering he will endure in the millennia that he must live for the sake of humanity.

Main cast

Actor Role
Alec Newman Paul Atreides/Muad'Dib
Julie Cox Princess Irulan
Edward Atterton Duncan Idaho
Ian McNeice Baron Vladimir Harkonnen
Barbora Kodetová Chani
Steven Berkoff Stilgar
Daniela Amavia Alia Atreides
Alice Krige[2] Lady Jessica
Susan Sarandon Princess Wensicia
P. H. Moriarty Gurney Halleck
James McAvoy Leto II Atreides
Jessica Brooks Ghanima Atreides
Jonathan Brüün Farad'n
Rik Young Javid
Martin McDougall Scytale
Jakob Schwarz Otheym
Klára Issová Lichna
Zuzana Geislerová Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam
Karel Dobry Korba
Gee Williams Bijaz

Development

Acquiring the television rights to Frank Herbert's original six Dune novels, Executive producer Richard P. Rubinstein envisioned the complex material adapted in a miniseries format, as he had done previously with Stephen King's The Stand and The Langoliers. He told The New York Times in 2003, "I have found there's a wonderful marriage to be had between long, complicated books and the television mini-series. There are some books that just can't be squeezed into a two-hour movie." Around the same time Rubenstein was first developing the material, the Sci Fi Channel's president, Bonnie Hammer, was spearheading a campaign for the channel to produce "blockbuster miniseries on a regular basis". Frank Herbert's Dune was the first in 2000, followed by Steven Spielberg's Taken in 2002, and Frank Herbert's Children of Dune and Battlestar Galactica in 2003.[1]

Rubenstein called his two Dune miniseries "science fiction for people who don't ordinarily like science fiction" and suggested that "the Dune saga tends to appeal to women in part because it features powerful female characters". Actress Sarandon agreed, saying "One of the reasons I always loved the books was because they were driven by strong women, living outside the rules." She added that the Dune series "is very apropos to some of what's going on in the world today. It's about the dangers of fundamentalism and the idea that absolute power corrupts." Sarandon said of portraying Wensicia, "it's always fun to play a smart villain."[1]

Adaptation

After production completed on the first miniseries (and before its broadcast), the Sci Fi Channel contracted writer/director Harrison to write a sequel. Harrison's idea for the next installment was to combine Frank Herbert's subsequent novels, Dune Messiah and Children of Dune. He has said in interviews that he believed both novels to be two parts of the same story, which essentially concludes the story of House Atreides.[3] The three-part, six-hour miniseries covers the bulk of the plot of Dune Messiah in the first installment, and adapts Children of Dune in the second and third parts.[4]

Soundtrack

The series' score, containing 36 tracks,[5][6] was written by Brian Tyler in a span of one month, and is considered one of Tyler's best scores.[7][8] The lyrics of the track "Inama Nushif" are sung by Azam Ali.[9] The music has been reused in several theatrical trailers, including Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, Cinderella Man, Kung Fu Panda, The Golden Compass, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, and Star Trek.[10]

Reception

Laura Fries of Variety cited the complexity of Herbert's novels and called the adaptation "decidedly more accessible—even if that means more soaplike".[11] Melanie McFarland of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer called the miniseries "exciting to watch", adding that "common couch potatoes will delight in the show's dark operatics, especially when cloaked in exquisite special effects" and that "Herbert devotees should be pleased with the outcome".[12] McFarland noted that, though complex, "Children of Dune doesn't feel weighed down by its ponderous story line, where its predecessor did".[12] Ron Wertheimer of The New York Times, however, wrote, "Subtlety? Nuance? No and no. The plot ... doesn't always make sense. The film ... unfolds more as a pageant than as a coherent narrative."[13] Emily Asher-Perrin of Tor.com wrote that "there are ways in which this sequel series outstrips the initial series entirely."[4] She praised the "clever changes" made to the plot, in particular the removal of Irulan from the conspiracy against Paul, and the expansion of Wensicia's role.[4] But Asher-Perrin also criticized the first installment, blaming the lack of plot and difficult-to-adapt themes in Dune Messiah.[4]

According to Fries, "it’s Susan Sarandon and Alice Krige who steal the thunder as opposing matriarchs of the great royal houses. Although the two never catfight, their ongoing struggle to rule the Dune dynasty gives this mini a real kick."[11] Observing that Sarandon and Krige were "clearly relishing their roles", Fries added that "Sarandon makes a formidable enemy, while Krige, traditionally cast as the villain, proves she can work both sides of the moral fence."[11] McFarland concurred, writing "[Sarandon's] princess may be the villain, cooking up deadly schemes, but we're right along with her in having a good time."[12] Stating that the acting "is at best utilitarian, the universally attractive performers embody attributes, not people", Wertheimer added:

The exception is the piece's token movie star ... Susan Sarandon, having a high old time as the villain. Looking swell in slinky gowns and a collection of outer-space-deco headgear fitted with sensual silver antennas, Ms. Sarandon nearly winks into the camera. Her body language, her purring tone, the gleam in her evil eye, the curve of her evil eyebrow all declare, "Isn't this a hoot?" In another film, such a jarring note from a principal would sink it. But she's right; this is a hoot. Her mugging is part of the fun.[13]

While Fries continues that "the mini picks up a great deal of charisma when McAvoy and Brooks come aboard as the next generation of the house of Atreides" and that "Amavia and Cox as the tortured Alia and the put-upon Irulan offer layered performances", she also adds that "Newman, as the sour Paul, sticks to just one note".[11] McFarland writes, Children of Dune's only annoyance is in the cast's insistence upon inexpressive acting. Fear may be the mind killer, but in this show power serves emotional strychnine—the more royal the character, the stiffer the expression.[12] Asher-Perrin cited several "moments of perfect execution", including Alia's death and the coded conversation between Irulan and Mohiam, and praised the costumes.[4] Fries also praised the miniseries' costumes and visual effects,[11] and Wertheimer wrote, "The best qualities of the earlier film are matched in its successor: the eye-filling vistas, the over-the-top sets and costumes, the nifty effects, all of them light years beyond standard made-for-television fare."[13] McFarland agreed, writing "What really keeps you engaged are Ernest Farino's special effects. He won an Emmy for his efforts on Dune, and tops that accomplishment here. The visuals are so incredible they demand a large screen viewing."[12]

Frank Herbert's Children of Dune and its predecessor Frank Herbert's Dune are two of the three highest-rated programs ever to be broadcast on the Sci-Fi Channel.[14][15]

Awards and nominations

Frank Herbert's Children of Dune won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Special Visual Effects for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special in 2003.[16] The miniseries was also nominated for Emmys for Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special,[17] Outstanding Hairstyling for a Limited Series or Movie,[17] and Outstanding Makeup for a Limited Series or Movie (Non-Prosthetic).[18]

References

  1. ^ a b c Berger, Warren (March 16, 2003). "Cover Story: Where Spice of Life Is the Vital Variety". The New York Times. Retrieved January 26, 2010.
  2. ^ Harrison has stated in interviews that Krige was his first choice to play Jessica in the original miniseries, but she was unavailable and Saskia Reeves won the role. Krige was cast for the sequel miniseries when Reeves was unavailable.
  3. ^ Fritz, Steve (December 4, 2000). "DUNE: Remaking the Classic Novel". Cinescape.com. Archived from the original on March 16, 2008. Retrieved March 14, 2010.
  4. ^ a b c d e Asher-Perrin, Emily (September 19, 2017). "SyFy's Children of Dune Miniseries Delivers On Emotion When Philosophy Falls Flat". Tor.com. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
  5. ^ Amazon.com: Children of Dune: Music
  6. ^ Children of Dune Original Television Soundtrack - Dune
  7. ^ Filmtracks: Children of Dune (Brian Tyler)
  8. ^ Children of Dune (2003) Soundtrack
  9. ^ "Azam Ali: The Landsraad Interview". The Landsraad. Retrieved 2006-11-11.
  10. ^ SoundtrackNet Trailers : Children of Dune (2003)
  11. ^ a b c d e Fries, Laura (March 11, 2003). "Review: Children of Dune". Variety. Archived from the original on August 21, 2015. Retrieved August 21, 2015.
  12. ^ a b c d e McFarland, Melanie (March 13, 2003). "Familial drama and effects power Children of Dune". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved August 20, 2015.
  13. ^ a b c Wertheimer, Ron (March 15, 2003). "TELEVISION REVIEW; A Stormy Family on a Sandy Planet". The New York Times. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  14. ^ Ascher, Ian (2004). "Kevin J. Anderson Interview". Archived from the original on July 3, 2007. Retrieved July 3, 2007 – via DigitalWebbing.com.
  15. ^ Asher-Perrin, Emily (May 9, 2017). "Syfy's Dune Miniseries is the Most Okay Adaptation of the Book to Date". Tor.com. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
  16. ^ "Nominees/Winners (Outstanding Special Visual Effects)". National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  17. ^ a b "Nominees/Winners (Outstanding Sound Editing/Hairstyling)". National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  18. ^ "Nominees/Winners (Outstanding Makeup)". National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Retrieved February 1, 2019.

External links

Alia Atreides

Alia Atreides

is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. Introduced in the first novel of the series, 1965's Dune, the character was originally killed in Herbert's first version of the manuscript. At the suggestion of Analog magazine editor John Campbell, Herbert kept her alive in the final draft. Alia would next appear as a main character in both Dune Messiah (1969) and Children of Dune (1976). The character is brought back as a ghola in the Brian Herbert/Kevin J. Anderson conclusion to the original series, Sandworms of Dune (2007).

In the novels, Alia is the daughter of Duke Leto Atreides of Caladan and his Bene Gesserit concubine, Lady Jessica, and the younger sister to Paul Atreides. Born on the planet Arrakis eight months after her father's death, she possesses the full powers of an adult Bene Gesserit Reverend Mother. Later known to her followers as St. Alia of the Knife, Alia is considered an Abomination by the Bene Gesserit because of the unique nature of her birth. As an adult, she becomes a devoted ally to Paul, and later regent for his children. She marries the ghola Duncan Idaho, but becomes possessed by the persona of her deceased maternal grandfather, Baron Vladimir Harkonnen.

Alia is portrayed by Alicia Witt in David Lynch's 1984 film adaptation, by Laura Burton in the 2000 miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune and by Daniela Amavia in its 2003 sequel, Frank Herbert's Children of Dune.

Barbora Kodetová

Barbora Kodetová (born 6 September 1970) is a Czech actress perhaps best known for her portrayal of Paul Atreides' concubine Chani in the 2000 television miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune and its 2003 sequel, Frank Herbert's Children of Dune.

She is the daughter of Czech actor Jiří Kodet, granddaughter of Czech actress Jiřina Steimarová and comes from a large family of actors. She is the cousin of actress Anna Polívková.

Barbora is married to violinist Pavel Šporcl. She has three daughters - Lily Marie (born 15 February 2001), Violeta (born 26 July 2007) and Sophie (born 24 August 2009).

Chani

Chani is a fictional character featured in Frank Herbert's novels Dune (1965) and Dune Messiah (1969). Known mainly as the Fremen wife and legal concubine of protagonist Paul "Muad'Dib" Atreides, Chani is the daughter of Imperial Planetologist Liet-Kynes and his Fremen wife Faroula, and later the mother of the twins Ghanima and Leto II Atreides. The character is resurrected as a ghola and appears in Hunters of Dune (2006) and Sandworms of Dune (2007), Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's novels which complete the original series.

Chani is portrayed by actress Sean Young in the David Lynch film Dune (1984), and by Barbora Kodetová in the John Harrison miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune (2000) and the sequel Frank Herbert's Children of Dune (2003). Zendaya will portray Chani in the upcoming Denis Villeneuve film Dune.

Children of Dune

Children of Dune is a 1976 science fiction novel by Frank Herbert, the third in his Dune series of six novels. Initially selling over 75,000 copies, it became the first hardcover best-seller ever in the science fiction field. The novel was critically well-received for its gripping plot, action, and atmosphere, and was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1977. It was originally serialized in Analog Science Fiction and Fact in 1976, and was the last Dune novel to be serialized before book publication. The novels Dune Messiah and Children of Dune were published in one volume by the Science Fiction Book Club in 2002 and the two were adapted into a well-received television miniseries entitled Frank Herbert's Children of Dune by the Sci-Fi Channel in 2003.

At the end of Dune Messiah, Paul Atreides walks into the desert, a blind man, leaving his twin children Leto and Ghanima in the care of the Fremen, while his sister Alia rules the universe as regent. Awakened in the womb by the spice, the children are the heirs to Paul's prescient vision of the fate of the universe, a role that Alia desperately craves. House Corrino schemes to return to the throne, while the Bene Gesserit make common cause with the Tleilaxu and Spacing Guild to gain control of the spice and the children of Paul Atreides.

Dune Messiah

Dune Messiah is a science fiction novel by American writer Frank Herbert, the second in his Dune series of six novels. It was originally serialized in Galaxy magazine in 1969. The American and British editions have different prologues summarizing events in the previous novel. Dune Messiah and its sequel Children of Dune were collectively adapted by the Sci-Fi Channel in 2003 into a miniseries entitled Frank Herbert's Children of Dune. In 2002, the Science Fiction Book Club also published the two novels in one volume.

Edward Atterton

Edward Atterton (born 24 January 1962 in Tamworth, Staffordshire, England) is an English actor and businessman.

Frank Herbert's Dune

Frank Herbert's Dune is a three-part science fiction television miniseries based on the eponymous novel by Frank Herbert. It was directed and adapted by John Harrison. The ensemble cast includes Alec Newman as Paul Atreides, William Hurt as Duke Leto, and Saskia Reeves as Jessica, as well as James Watson, P. H. Moriarty, Robert Russell, Ian McNeice, and Giancarlo Giannini.

The series was produced by New Amsterdam Entertainment, Blixa Film Produktion and Hallmark Entertainment. It was first broadcast in the United States on December 3, 2000, on the Sci Fi Channel. It was later released on DVD in 2001, with an extended director's cut appearing in 2002.A 2003 sequel miniseries called Frank Herbert's Children of Dune continues the story, adapting the second and third novels in the series (1969's Dune Messiah and its 1976 sequel Children of Dune). Both miniseries are two of the three highest-rated programs ever to be broadcast on the Sci Fi Channel.

Frank Herbert's Dune won two Emmy Awards in 2001 for Outstanding Cinematography and Outstanding Special Visual Effects in a miniseries or movie, and was nominated for a third Emmy for Outstanding Sound Editing. The series was also praised by several critics, including Kim Newman.The miniseries was shot in Univisium (2.00:1) aspect ratio, although it was broadcast in 1.78:1.

Gaius Helen Mohiam

Gaius Helen Mohiam is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. She is a Bene Gesserit Reverend Mother, and initially appears in the 1965 novel Dune and its 1969 sequel, Dune Messiah. Mohiam also has a major role in the Prelude to Dune prequel trilogy (1999–2001) by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson.

In Dune, Mohiam is the Imperial Truthsayer, and the mentor of Lady Jessica, the Bene Gesserit concubine of Duke Leto Atreides. Mohiam is interested in Jessica's young son Paul Atreides, who is a key figure in the Bene Gesserit breeding program but has also displayed unusual potential. She ultimately loses any influence she may have had over Jessica or Paul, who ally themselves with the native Fremen of Arrakis and depose Padishah Emperor Shaddam IV. In Dune Messiah, Mohiam joins a conspiracy to remove Paul from power, which fails.

Mohiam is portrayed by Siân Phillips in David Lynch's 1984 film Dune, and by Zuzana Geislerová in the 2000 miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune and its 2003 sequel Frank Herbert's Children of Dune. The character will be played by Charlotte Rampling in the upcoming Denis Villeneuve film Dune.

Ghanima Atreides

Ghanima Atreides (; "spoil of war" in the Fremen language) is a fictional character from the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. Born at the end of Dune Messiah (1969), Ghanima is a central character in Children of Dune (1976). She also appears as a child in the Brian Herbert/Kevin J. Anderson prequel The Winds of Dune (2009).

Ghanima is portrayed by Jessica Brooks in the 2003 miniseries Frank Herbert's Children of Dune.

Gurney Halleck

Gurney Halleck is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. He is a major character in Herbert's Dune (1965) and Children of Dune (1976), and appears in some of the prequel and sequel novels by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson.

Gurney is portrayed by Patrick Stewart in the 1984 David Lynch film Dune. P. H. Moriarty played the role in the 2000 Sci-Fi Channel TV miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune and its 2003 sequel, Frank Herbert's Children of Dune. The character will be played by Josh Brolin in the upcoming Denis Villeneuve film Dune.

Inama Nushif

"Inama Nushif" is a track from the soundtrack to the 2003 Sci Fi Channel mini-series Frank Herbert's Children of Dune. It is sung entirely in the fictional Fremen language by Azam Ali. The lyrics and score were both written by Brian Tyler, who composed the soundtrack for the mini-series.The track can be heard during the "Cleansing of the House" montage, in which Leto II and Ghanima are born and various loose ends are tied up, removing possible threats to House Atreides and Paul Muad'Dib. Brian Tyler claimed that he pieced the lyrics together from excerpts of the Fremen language that appear throughout the Dune series of novels, and that the title translates as "She is Eternal". However, the lyrics are in fact an adaptation of a Fremen version of one of Paul Atreides's speeches in The Dune Encyclopedia."Inama Nushif" has been reused as trailer music for several theatrical films, including Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, Cinderella Man, Kung Fu Panda, The Golden Compass, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, and Star Trek.

Julie Cox

Julie Cox (born 24 April 1973) is an English actress. She played Princess Irulan in the Sci Fi Channel's 2000 miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune and its 2003 sequel, Frank Herbert's Children of Dune.

Lady Jessica

Lady Jessica is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. A main character in the 1965 novel Dune, Jessica also plays an important role in the later installment Children of Dune (1976). The events surrounding Jessica's conception, her birth and her early years with Leto are chronicled in the Prelude to Dune prequel trilogy (1999–2001) by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. The character is brought back as a ghola in the Herbert/Anderson sequels which conclude the original series, Hunters of Dune (2006) and Sandworms of Dune (2007).

Jessica is described in Dune as having "hair like shaded bronze ... and green eyes" as well as an "oval face." This shape is later notable as a marker of Jessica's bloodline.Lady Jessica was portrayed by Francesca Annis in the 1984 David Lynch film Dune. Saskia Reeves played the role in the 2000 Sci-Fi Channel TV miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune, and was succeeded by Alice Krige in the 2003 sequel, Frank Herbert's Children of Dune. Rebecca Ferguson will portray Jessica in the upcoming Denis Villeneuve film Dune.

According to the dedication of The Road to Dune (2005), the character of Jessica is patterned after Frank Herbert's wife Beverly Herbert.

What can I say about Jessica? Given the opportunity, she would attempt Voice on God.

Leto II Atreides

Leto II Atreides () is a fictional character from the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. Born at the end of Dune Messiah (1969), Leto is a central character in Children of Dune (1976) and is the title character of God Emperor of Dune (1981). The character is brought back as a ghola in the Brian Herbert/Kevin J. Anderson sequels which conclude the original series, Hunters of Dune (2006) and Sandworms of Dune (2007). Leto also appears as a child in the prequel The Winds of Dune (2009).

Leto is the son of Paul Atreides and his Fremen concubine Chani, and the twin brother of Ghanima. Leto is named for his paternal grandfather Duke Leto I Atreides, who is killed in the Harkonnen invasion of the desert planet Arrakis (Dune) during the events of Dune (1965). Leto II is the second child of Paul to bear that name, the first having been killed as an infant by the Emperor's Sardaukar in Dune.

Leto is portrayed by James McAvoy in the 2003 miniseries Frank Herbert's Children of Dune.

P. H. Moriarty

Patrick H. "P.H." Moriarty, 27 February 1939, Deptford, London) is an English actor, known for his role as 'Razors' in John Mackenzie's The Long Good Friday.

Princess Irulan

Princess Irulan is a fictional character and member of House Corrino in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. She first appears in Dune (1965), and is later featured in Dune Messiah (1969) and Children of Dune (1976). The character's birth and early childhood are touched upon in the Prelude to Dune prequel trilogy (1999–2001) by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson, and she is a principal character in the Herbert/Anderson series Heroes of Dune (2008–2009). Irulan has also appeared in all film and television adaptations of Herbert's Dune works.

The character of Irulan serves as a de facto narrator in Dune, with excerpts of her later writings used as epigraphs before each chapter of the novel. Within the storyline, Irulan is established as the eldest daughter of the 81st Padishah Emperor Shaddam IV and Anirul, a Bene Gesserit of Hidden Rank; she has four younger sisters and no brothers. In Dune, the character appears in person only near the end of the novel, but continues as a regular character in the sequels Dune Messiah and Children of Dune. Epigraphs attributed to Irulan also appear—to a much lesser extent—in these subsequent novels, and others in the extended series.

Irulan is portrayed by Virginia Madsen in the 1984 film Dune, and by Julie Cox in the 2000 TV miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune and its 2003 sequel, Frank Herbert's Children of Dune.

Scytale (Dune)

Scytale is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. In the novel Dune Messiah (1969), Scytale is a Tleilaxu Face Dancer who participates in the conspiracy to topple the rule of Paul Atreides. He later returns as a ghola and Tleilaxu Master in Heretics of Dune (1984) and Chapterhouse: Dune (1985). Finally, Scytale's story continues in Hunters of Dune (2006) and Sandworms of Dune (2007), Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson's sequel novels that complete Frank Herbert's original series.

The character is portrayed by Martin McDougall in the 2003 miniseries Frank Herbert's Children of Dune.

Wensicia

Princess Wensicia is a fictional character and member of House Corrino from the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. She was introduced in Herbert's 1976 novel Children of Dune and appeared decades later in the 2008 novel Paul of Dune by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson.

As established in the appendix of Dune (1965), Wensicia is the third daughter of the 81st Padishah Emperor Shaddam IV and Anirul, a Bene Gesserit of Hidden Rank. Her oldest sister is the Princess Irulan; her three other siblings are sisters Chalice, Josifa and Rugi. Wensicia accompanies her father into exile on Salusa Secundus after he is deposed by Paul Atreides in Dune.Wensicia is portrayed by Susan Sarandon in the 2003 miniseries Frank Herbert's Children of Dune.

Zuzana Geislerová

Zuzana Geislerová (born 14 March 1952) is a Czech actress known to United States audiences for her role as the Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam in the Sci Fi Channel's 2000 miniseries Frank Herbert's Dune and its 2003 sequel, Frank Herbert's Children of Dune.

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