Frank E. Hering

Frank Earl Hering (April 30, 1874 – July 11, 1943) was an American football player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball. He served as the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame from 1896 to 1898, compiling a record of 12–6–1. Hering was also the first basketball coach at Notre Dame, coaching one season in 1897–1898, and helmed the school's baseball team for three seasons from 1897 to 1899.

Hering was born in Sunbury, Pennsylvania and played quarterback for the Chicago Maroons in 1893 and 1894. His first head coaching job was with the Bucknell Bison in 1895. The next year, he arrived at Notre Dame to play quarterback for the football team; but by 1898 he had taken on the additional responsibility of directing the entire athletic department, including coaching the football and baseball teams, and introducing basketball to the university. He earned the title of "Father of Notre Dame Football" for his success in expanding the football program from an intramural activity to a full-fledged intercollegiate sport. Hering officially dedicated the new Notre Dame Stadium in 1930.

Hering is also recognized by the Fraternal Order of Eagles as the "Father of Mother's Day" for his work in promoting the establishment of a national holiday, having given public speeches supporting the idea as early as 1904.[1][2] Hering was a member of Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity.[3]

While a member of the Notre Dame faculty in his later years, Hering was known for his outreach programs in South Bend, Indiana, including the establishment of "Hering House"—a civic center for the African-American community.

Frank E. Hering
Frank Hering
Hering as Notre Dames's coach and captain in 1896
Biographical details
BornApril 30, 1874
DiedJuly 11, 1943 (aged 69)
Playing career
Football
1893–1894Chicago
1896Notre Dame
Position(s)Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1895Bucknell (assistant)
1896–1898Notre Dame
Basketball
1897–1898Notre Dame
Baseball
1897–1899Notre Dame
Head coaching record
Overall12–6–1 (football)
1–2 (basketball)
17–7 (baseball)

Head coaching record

Football

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Notre Dame (Independent) (1896–1898)
1896 Notre Dame 4–3
1897 Notre Dame 4–1–1
1898 Notre Dame 4–2
Notre Dame: 12–6–1
Total: 12–6–1

References

  1. ^ "Annie's "Mother's Day" History Page". Retrieved 2008-06-26.
  2. ^ "Fraternal Order of Eagles: The History of Mother's Day". Retrieved 2008-01-26.
  3. ^ "Historic Phi Gamma Delta sites of Indianapolis, Indiana". Retrieved 2017-05-29.

Additional sources

1896 Notre Dame football team

The 1896 Notre Dame football team was an American football team that represented the University of Notre Dame in the 1896 college football season. Frank E. Hering was the team's captain and coach. The team compiled a 4–3 record, shut out four opponents, and outscored its opponents by a combined total of 160 to 50.

1897 Notre Dame football team

The 1897 Notre Dame football team was an American football team that represented the University of Notre Dame in the 1897 college football season. In its second season with Frank E. Hering as coach, the team compiled a 4–1–1 record, shut out four opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 165 to 40.

1898 Notre Dame football team

The 1898 Notre Dame football team was an American football team that represented the University of Notre Dame in the 1898 college football season. In its third season with Frank E. Hering as coach, the team compiled a 4–2 record, shut out four opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 155 to 34.

A. A. Ewing

A. A. Ewing was an American football player and coach. He served as the second head football coach at Northwestern University, coaching one season in 1894 and compiling a record of 4–5. This ranks him 20th at Northwestern in total wins and 15th at Northwestern in winning percentage. Ewing attended classes at the University of Chicago in 1894 while he was coach at Northwestern and also played for the Chicago Maroons football team that season. adham

Elmer Ripley

Elmer H. Ripley (July 21, 1891 – April 29, 1982) was an American basketball coach. He coached college basketball at seven different schools and for several professional teams.

Fraternal Order of Eagles

Fraternal Order of Eagles (F.O.E.) is an international fraternal organization that was founded on February 6, 1898, in Seattle, Washington, by a group of six theater owners including John Cort (the first president), brothers John W. and Tim J. Considine, Harry (H.L.) Leavitt (who later joined the Loyal Order of Moose), Mose Goldsmith and Arthur Williams. Originally made up of those engaged in one way or another in the performing arts, the Eagles grew and claimed credit for establishing the Mother's Day holiday in the United States as well as the "impetus for Social Security" in the United States. Their lodges are known as "aeries".

George Keogan

George E. Keogan (March 8, 1890 – February 17, 1943) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach, most known for coaching basketball at the University of Notre Dame from 1923 to 1943. Keogan never had a losing season in his 20 years at Notre Dame.

The Minnesota Lake, Minnesota native attended University of Minnesota from 1909 to 1913. He began coaching high school varsities after his freshman year in college, guiding first Lockport High School (1910–1911) followed by Riverside High School (1911–1912). Meanwhile, he was also coaching several college basketball teams: Charles City College in Iowa (1909–1910), Superior State Teachers College in Wisconsin (1912–1914), Saint Louis University (1914–15) and the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota (1917–1918). During World War I he served at Great Lakes Naval Training Station. After briefly coaching Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania (1919–1920) and Valparaiso, Keogan arrived at University of Notre Dame. He served as head basketball and baseball coach, as well as assistant to the legendary football coach Knute Rockne. Keogan compiled a 327–96–1 at Notre Dame.

Keogan died on February 17, 1943 of a heart attack at his home in South Bend, Indiana. After his death, Moose Krause took over his job as Notre Dame's head basketball coach. Keogan was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1961 and the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006.

Henry J. McGlew

Henry J. "Fuzzy" McGlew of Chelsea, Massachusetts was a quarterback and head coach of the Notre Dame college football program.

In his two years as a starting quarterback from 1901 to 1902, the team achieved a combined record of 14–3–2. His best game came against the American College of Medicine and Surgery in 1902, when he made runs of 80, 65 and 40 yards and scored one touchdown. In 1903, he moved to left end, and helped the team to achieve their first undefeated season. McGlew never once fumbled the ball during his playing career.

McGlew was a teammate of College Football Hall of Famer Red Salmon, and succeeded him as head coach of the Irish in 1905. His lone season as coach included a record-setting 142–0 victory over American Medical, but the team finished a disappointing 5–4, and McGlew retired from the coaching ranks.

Hering (surname)

Hering is a German surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Constantine Hering (1800–1880), German-born pioneer of homeopathy in the United States

Daniel Webster Hering (1850–1938), American physicist

Erich Martin Hering (1893–1967), German entomologist

Ewald Hering (1834–1918), German physiologist

Frank E. Hering (1874–1943), American football player and coach

Gottlieb Hering (1887–1945), German Nazi SS extermination camp commandant

Harold Hering (born 1936), American former officer of the U.S. Air Force

Henry Hering (1874–1949), American sculptor

Jutta Hering (born 1924), German film editor

Kathleen Hering, German bobsledder

Kristof Hering (born 1989), German singer

Loy Hering (1484–1564), German Renaissance sculptor

Mandy Hering (born 1984), German handball player

Jeanie Hering, pseudonym of Marion Jean Catherine Adams-Acton (1846–1928), Scottish novelist

Robert Hering (born 1990), German sprinter

Rudolph Hering (1847–1923), civil engineer

James M. Sheldon

James Milton Sheldon Sr. (c. 1880 – July 7, 1965) was an American football player, coach of football and basketball, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Indiana University from 1905 to 1913, compiling a record of 35–26–3. Sheldon was also the head basketball coach at Indiana for one season, in 1906–07, tallying a mark of 9–5. In addition, he served as Indiana's athletic director from 1907 to 1910.

Jesse Harper

Jesse Clair Harper (December 10, 1883 – July 31, 1961) was an American football and baseball player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Alma College (1906–1907), Wabash College (1909–1912), and the University of Notre Dame (1913–1917), compiling a career college football record of 57–17–7. Harper was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1971.

John Dee (basketball)

John Francis Dee, Jr. (September 12, 1923 – April 24, 1999) was head basketball coach at the University of Alabama from 1953 to 1956 and the University of Notre Dame from 1964 to 1971.

John L. Marks

John L. "Jack" Marks was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame from 1911 to 1912, compiling a record of 13–0–2. Marks played college football at Dartmouth College.On October 5, 1912, in one of the easiest victories in Notre Dame history, junior quarterback Gus Dorais led the Irish to a 116–7 rout of St. Viator in the season-opener.

List of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football seasons

This is a list of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football season records. The Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team is the football team of the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, United States. The team competes as an Independent at the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision level.

Notre Dame has the most consensus national championships and has produced more All-Americans than any other Football Bowl Subdivision school. Additionally, seven Fighting Irish football players have won the Heisman Trophy.

Notre Dame is one of only two Catholic universities that field a team in the Football Bowl Subdivision, the other being Boston College, and one of a handful of programs independent of a football conference. The team plays its home games on Notre Dame's campus at Notre Dame Stadium, also known as the "House that Rockne Built," which has a capacity of 80,795.

Notre Dame claims national championships in an additional three seasons, for a total of 11 consensus national championships. Notre Dame, however, is often credited with 13 national championships in total. The 1938 and 1953 seasons are the reason for the discrepancy. In 1938, 8-1 Notre Dame was awarded the national championship by the Dickinson System, while Texas Christian (which finished 11-0) was awarded the championship by the Associated Press. In the 1953 season, an undefeated Notre Dame team (9-0-1) was named national champion by every major selector except the AP and UPI (Coaches) polls, where the Irish finished second in both to 10-1 Maryland. As Notre Dame has a policy of only recognizing AP and Coaches Poll national championships post-1936, the school does not officially recognize the 1938 and 1953 national championships.

List of Notre Dame Fighting Irish head football coaches

This is a list of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football head coaches. The Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team is the football team of the University of Notre Dame, located in South Bend, Indiana, United States. The team competes as an Independent at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision level. Notre Dame has produced more All-Americans than any other Football Bowl Subdivision school. Additionally, seven Fighting Irish football players have won the Heisman Trophy. Notre Dame is one of only two Catholic universities that field a team in the Football Bowl Subdivision, the other being Boston College, and one of a handful of programs independent of a football conference. The team plays its home games on Notre Dame's campus at Notre Dame Stadium, also known as the "House that Rockne Built", which has a capacity of 80,795. The head coach is Brian Kelly.

List of Past Grand Worthy Presidents

This list contains the year and name of Past Grand Worthy Presidents for the Fraternal Order of Eagles

Lou Criger

Louis Criger (February 3, 1872 – May 14, 1934) was a Major League Baseball catcher with the Cleveland Spiders, St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Browns and the New York Highlanders between 1896 and 1912.

Criger became the first Opening Day catcher in Boston American League franchise's history. A catcher for most of Cy Young's 511 victories, he also caught every inning for eight games with Boston in the first-ever World Series in 1903, helping his team win the championship.

In a 16-season career, he batted .221 with 11 home runs and 342 RBIs. Criger stole 58 career bases and scored 337 runs. He had 709 career hits in 3202 at bats.

Though never a major star, Criger received votes for the Hall of Fame in four BBWAA elections. He garnered as much as eight percent of the vote.

Walter Halas

Walter Henry Halas (January 15, 1892 – December 20, 1959) was an American baseball player and coach of American football, basketball, and baseball. He played college baseball at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign from 1914 to 1916 as a pitcher for the Fighting Illini. Halas later pitched in minor league baseball for the Davenport Blue Sox, Moline Plowboys, and Rock Island Islanders of the Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League. In 1924, he pitched a no-hitter for the Hanover Raiders of the Blue Ridge League.

Halas died in Chicago on December 20, 1959 at the age of 67. He was the brother of George Halas, longtime coach and owner of the National Football League's Chicago Bears.

Walter Steffen

Walter Steffen (October 9, 1886 – March 9, 1937) was an American football player and coach. He emerged on the national scene as a high school quarterback, leading his Chicago North Division team to an intersectional championship over Brooklyn Boys by a score of 75–0 that ended after three quarters because of darkness. Steffen and his team helped introduce the more open style of play that prevailed in the Midwest. He played college football as a quarterback at the University of Chicago from 1906 to 1908 and was a two-time All-American selection. Steffen served as the head football coach at the Carnegie Institute of Technology—now known as Carnegie Mellon University–from 1914 to 1932, compiling a record of 88–53–8. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1969.

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