Frank Carideo

Francis F. Carideo (August 4, 1908 – March 17, 1992) was an American football player and coach of football and basketball. He played quarterback at the University of Notre Dame from 1928 to 1930, where he was a two-time All-American. Carideo served as the head football coach at the University of Missouri from 1932 to 1934, compiling a record of 2–23–2. He was also the head basketball coach at Mississippi State University from 1935 to 1939, tallying a mark of 43–39. Carideo was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1954.

Frank Carideo
Frank Carideo
Biographical details
BornAugust 4, 1908
Mount Vernon, New York
DiedMarch 17, 1992 (aged 83)
Ocean Springs, Mississippi
Playing career
Football
1928–1930Notre Dame
Position(s)Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1931Purdue (assistant)
1932–1934Missouri
1935–1938Mississippi State (assistant)
1939–1942Iowa (assistant)
1946–1949Iowa (assistant)
Basketball
1935–1939Mississippi State
Head coaching record
Overall2–23–2 (football)
43–39 (basketball)
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
All-American, 1929
All-American, 1930
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1954 (profile)

Biography

Carideo was born in Mount Vernon, New York. He attended the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, where he played quarterback for coach Knute Rockne's Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team from 1928 to 1930. As a college football player he was considered so good, that even Rockne said he was the best quarterback ever. During the 1929 and 1930 seasons, the Fighting Irish posted a perfect 19–0 record with him as the starter, and he is remembered as a "big play maker."

Carideo was also an assistant coach at Purdue in 1931, at Mississippi State from 1935 to 1938, and at Iowa from 1939 to 1942 and 1946 to 1949.

Carideo died in Ocean Springs, Mississippi in 1992; he was 83 years old.

Head coaching record

Football

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Missouri Tigers (Big Six Conference) (1932–1934)
1932 Missouri 1–7–1 1–3–1 5th
1933 Missouri 1–8 0–5 6th
1934 Missouri 0–8–1 0–5 6th
Missouri: 2–23–2 1–13–1
Total: 2–23–2

See also

External links

1929 College Football All-America Team

The 1929 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1929. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1929 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and (7) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA).

1929 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1929 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1929 college football season. Led by twelfth-year head coach Knute Rockne, the independent Irish won all nine games and outscored its opponents 145 to 38, with four shutouts.

When Rockne fell ill, Tom Lieb became de facto head coach. Notre Dame was selected as the national champion by Billingsley Report, Boand System, Dickinson System, Dunkel System, College Football Researchers Association, Helms Athletic Foundation, National Championship Foundation, Poling System, and Jeff Sagarin's ELO-Chess system.The three home games this season were played at Soldier Field in Chicago, Illinois. On campus, Cartier Field was razed and the new Notre Dame Stadium opened the following season in 1930.

1930 College Football All-America Team

The 1930 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1930. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1930 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and (7) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA).

1932 Missouri Tigers football team

The 1932 Missouri Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Missouri in the Big Six Conference (Big 6) during the 1932 college football season. The team compiled a 1–7–1 record (1–3–1 against Big 6 opponents), finished in fifth place in the Big 6, and was outscored by all opponents by a combined total of 184 to 32. Frank Carideo was the head coach for the first of three seasons. The team played its home games at Memorial Stadium in Columbia, Missouri.

The team's leading scorer was Charles Schiele with 12 points.

1933 Missouri Tigers football team

The 1933 Missouri Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Missouri in the Big Six Conference (Big 6) during the 1933 college football season. The team compiled a 1–8 record (0–5 against Big 6 opponents), finished in sixth place in the Big 6, and was outscored by all opponents by a combined total of 193 to 58. Frank Carideo was the head coach for the second of three seasons. The team played its home games at Memorial Stadium in Columbia, Missouri.

The team's leading scorer was Sidney Johnson with 18 points.

1934 Missouri Tigers football team

The 1934 Missouri Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Missouri in the Big Six Conference (Big 6) during the 1934 college football season. The team compiled a 0–8–1 record (0–5 against Big 6 opponents), finished in sixth place in the Big 6, and was outscored by all opponents by a combined total of 172 to 25. Frank Carideo was the head coach for the third of three seasons. The team played its home games at Memorial Stadium in Columbia, Missouri.

The team's leading scorer was Harold Bourne with 13 points.

A. L. McRae

Austin Lee McRae (October 25, 1861 – March 18, 1922) was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Missouri in 1890 and at the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy—now Missouri University of Science and Technology—from 1893 to 1899, compiling a career college football coaching record of 4–8.

C. D. Bliss

Clifford Douglas "Pop" Bliss (July 16, 1870 – March 26, 1948) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Stanford University, Haverford College, and the University of Missouri, compiling a career college football record of 15–6–1. Bliss played football at Yale University as a halfback alongside his brother, Laurie Bliss, who went on to coach at the United States Military Academy and Lehigh University.

Charles Young (American football)

Charles E. Young (c. 1867 – March 21, 1908) was an American football coach. He was the seventh head football coach at the University of Missouri and he held that position for the 1897 season. His career coaching record at Missouri was 5–6. He died of typhoid in 1908.

Chauncey Simpson

Chauncey Simpson (December 21, 1901 – April 20, 1970) was the interim head football coach at Missouri from 1943 to 1945 while Don Faurot, the standing head coach, served in the Navy during World War II. He compiled a 12–14–2 record including a 40–27 loss to Texas in the 1946 Cotton Bowl Classic. During that time, he also served as the school's track coach. He himself, was a football player at Missouri. With Faurot's return in 1946 Simpson reverted to his pre-war position as an assistant football coach. He was also the institution's long-time golf coach before retiring in the 1960s.He was the younger brother of hurdler and track coach Robert Simpson.

E. H. Jones (coach)

E. H. "Sallie" Jones was an American football coach. He was the third head football coach at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri, serving for one season, in 1892, and compiling a record of 1–2.

Frank "Nordy" Hoffman

Frank "Nordy" Hoffman (December 19, 1909 — April 5, 1996) was an American college football player at the University of Notre Dame where his record as All-American guard during the 1930 and 1931 seasons was commemorated, in 1978, with election to the College Football Hall of Fame. From 1975 to 1981, he served as the Sergeant at Arms of the United States Senate.His full name was Frank Nordhoff Hoffmann and everyone called him "Nordy". Born in Seattle, he attended St. Martin High School but didn't play football there. He enrolled at the University of Notre Dame and met football coach, Knute Rockne. The coach noted his size, 6-2 and 224 pounds, and asked Nordy to try out for football. As a sophomore, he was a fourth-string tackle on the 1929 squad that included some legendary Notre Dame names...Frank Carideo, Marty Brill, Frank Leahy, Marchy Schwartz, Tommy Yarr and Jack Cannon. He moved up to the varsity as a second-string tackle in 1930 and first-string guard in 1931. The Associated Press and Liberty Magazine named him to their All-America teams. The Notre Dame Fighting Irish football publicist, Joe Petritz, described Nordy as "the spark plug of the line, inspirational, fast, aggressive and consistent". He was a shot putter on the track team, and the student paper referred to him as a blue-eyed, blond-haired athlete who played piano and sang. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1978, and he called the ceremonies of the National Football Foundation, "the most beautiful thing that has happened to me". One of his prizes at his Hall of Fame induction was a book filled with letters of congratulation from presidents Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford and all 100 U.S. Senators. Nordy served as sergeant-at-arms of the U.S. Senate, retiring in 1984.Hoffman died in Potomac, Maryland at the age of 91.

Hal Reid (American football)

Hal Reed was an American football coach. He was the second head football coach at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri, serving for one season, in 1891, and compiling a record of 3–1.

Harry Orman Robinson

Harry Orman "Jake" Robinson (February 26, 1872 – October 1933) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Missouri (1893–1894), the University of Texas at Austin (1896), and the University of Maine (1897), compiling a career college football record of 13–10–1. The Bangor, Maine native was born on February 26, 1872 and played football as a lineman at Tufts University.

List of Mississippi State Bulldogs men's basketball head coaches

Mississippi State University has had 20 head coaches in the entire 100 year history of the men's basketball program.

List of Missouri Tigers football seasons

List of Missouri Tigers football annual records since inception in 1890.

List of Missouri Tigers head football coaches

The Missouri Tigers football program is a college football team that represents the University of Missouri in the East Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The team has had 31 head coaches since it started playing organized football in 1890 with the nickname Tigers. Missouri joined the Western Interstate University Football Association in December 1891, later winning the conference championship three years in a row. The conference disbanded after the 1897 season and Missouri remained independent until joining the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1907. After several changes, the conference eventually became the Big Eight Conference. The Tigers became a charter member of the Big 12 in 1996 when the Big Eight disbanded. Missouri subsequently left the Big 12 following the 2011 season and joined as the 14th member of the SEC effective for the 2012 season. The Tigers have played 1,180 games during their 119 seasons. In those seasons, seven coaches have led Missouri to postseason bowl games: Don Faurot, Chauncey Simpson, Dan Devine, Al Onofrio, Warren Powers, Larry Smith, and Gary Pinkel. Nine coaches have also won conference championships with the Tigers: Harry Orman Robinson, C. D. Bliss, Bill Roper, Chester Brewer, John F. Miller, Gwinn Henry, Faurot, Simpson and Devine.

Faurot is the all-time leader in games coached (190), years coached (19) and total wins (101). Roper has the highest winning percentage of any coach, with a percentage of .938 during his one year. Of coaches who served more than one season, James Phelan leads with a .813 winning percentage. Frank Carideo is, in terms of winning percentage, the worst coach the Tigers have had (.111). Onofrio and Smith have both been awarded coach of the year honors in their conference by the Associated Press. Of the 31 Tigers coaches, five have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: Roper, Phelan, Faurot, Frank Broyles and Devine. The current head coach is Barry Odom, who was hired in December 2015.

List of Notre Dame Fighting Irish starting quarterbacks

The following individuals have started games at quarterback for the University of Notre Dame football team, updated through the 2018 season.

The year of induction into the College Football Hall of Fame, if applicable, is designated alongside the respective player's final season.

Warren Powers

Warren Anthony Powers (born February 19, 1941) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Washington State University in 1977, and the University of Missouri from 1978 to 1984, compiling an overall college football record of 53–37–3 (.586).

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