Frank Balasz

Frank Steve Balasz (January 23, 1918 – August 6, 1962) was a professional American football player for the Green Bay Packers and the Chicago Cardinals from 1939–1945. A member of the 1939 NFL Champion Packers, he played in the annual All-Star Game that year. He played at the collegiate level at the University of Iowa.

Frank Balasz
No. 35
Position:Fullback, linebacker, defensive back
Personal information
Born:January 23, 1918
Chicago
Died:August 6, 1962 (aged 44)
Career information
College:Iowa
NFL Draft:1939 / Round: 18 / Pick: 169
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing attempts/yards:60/228
Receptions/yards:5/50
Touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com

See also

External links

1939 Green Bay Packers season

The 1939 Green Bay Packers season was their 21st season overall and their 19th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–2 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season by beating the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game 27–0, earning the Packers their fifth NFL Championship and the first title game shutout ever recorded.

1939 NFL Draft

The 1939 National Football League Draft was held on December 9, 1938, at the New Yorker Hotel in New York City, New York.

1940 Green Bay Packers season

The 1940 Green Bay Packers season was their 22nd season overall and their 20th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–4–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning them a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

1940 National Football League All-Star Game (January)

The 1940 National Football League All-star Game was the professional football league's second all-star game. The game pitted the Green Bay Packers, the league's champion for the 1939 season, against a team of all-stars. The game was played on Sunday, January 14, 1940, at Gilmore Stadium in Los Angeles, California in front of 18,000 fans. The Packers defeated the all-stars by a score of 16–7. The game was originally scheduled to be played on the previous Sunday, but it was delayed due to rain.The players on the all-star squad were selected by a national poll of fans. Wilbur Crowell was the referee for the game.

Green Bay Packers draft history

This page is a list of the Green Bay Packers NFL Draft selections. The Packers have participated in every NFL draft since it began in 1936, in which they made Russ Letlow their first-ever selection.

Tony Canadeo

Anthony Robert Canadeo (May 5, 1919 – November 29, 2003) was a professional American football player who played halfback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Green Bay Packers from 1941 to 1952, having missed most of the 1944 season and the entire 1945 season while serving in the U.S. Army during World War II. Canadeo was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois before moving to Spokane, Washington to attend Gonzaga University. He played football for the Gonzaga Bulldogs, where he earned the nickname "Gray Ghost of Gonzaga". Drafted by the Packers in the 1941 NFL Draft, Canadeo went on to play multiple positions, including running back, quarterback, defensive back, punter, and return specialist.

Before the war, Canadeo was a triple-threat halfback for the Packers, leading the team in rushing and passing in 1943. When he returned from the war in 1946 he served primarily as a running back, and in 1949 became the third player in NFL history to rush for 1,000 or more yards in a season. He retired as the Packers' all-time rushing yards leader, and as of 2018 ranks fourth in franchise history in that category. Canadeo's number 3 was retired by the Packers immediately following his retirement as a player. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame and Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame in 1974. After his playing career, Canadeo worked as a color commentator for NFL on CBS, covering Packers with Ray Scott. He also was a long-time member of the Green Bay Packers, Inc. Board of Directors and Executive Committee, most notably during the Vince Lombardi era. Canadeo died in 2003 at the age of 84.

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