Francis Peay

Francis G. Peay (May 23, 1944 – September 21, 2013) was an American football offensive tackle and head coach.

Peay played college football at the University of Missouri and was selected in the first round of the 1966 NFL Draft by the New York Giants. He also played for the Green Bay Packers and Kansas City Chiefs.

After his playing career, Peay served as the head football coach at Northwestern University from 1986 to 1991. He was the second black head coach in the Big Ten Conference, after his predecessor Dennis Green. His coaching record at Northwestern was 13 wins, 51 losses, and two ties. This ranks him 12th at Northwestern in total wins and 24th at Northwestern in winning percentage.[1] He was succeeded at Northwestern in 1992 by Gary Barnett.

Peay died September 21, 2013 at the age of 69.[2]

Francis Peay
Born:May 23, 1944
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Died:September 21, 2013 (aged 69)
St. Louis, Missouri
Career information
Position(s)Tackle
CollegeMissouri
High schoolPittsburgh (PA) Schenley
AFL draft1966 / Round: 2 / Pick: 15
(By the Kansas City Chiefs)
NFL draft1966 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10
Career history
As player
1966–1967New York Giants
1968–1972Green Bay Packers
1973–1974Kansas City Chiefs
Career stats

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Northwestern Wildcats (Big Ten Conference) (1986–1991)
1986 Northwestern 4–7 2–6 T–8th
1987 Northwestern 2–8–1 2–6 9th
1988 Northwestern 2–8–1 2–5–1 T–7th
1989 Northwestern 0–11 0–8 10th
1990 Northwestern 2–9 1–7 T–8th
1991 Northwestern 3–8 2–6 T–8th
Northwestern: 13–51–2 9–38–1
Total: 13–51–2

References

  1. ^ Northwestern Wildcats coaching records Archived October 7, 2012, at WebCite
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 28, 2013. Retrieved September 22, 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links

1964 Missouri Tigers football team

The 1964 Missouri Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Missouri in the Big Eight Conference (Big 8) during the 1964 college football season. The team compiled a 6–3–1 record (4–2–1 against Big 8 opponents), finished in fourth place in the Big 8, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 142 to 88. Dan Devine was the head coach for the seventh of 13 seasons. The team played its home games at Memorial Stadium in Columbia, Missouri.

The team's statistical leaders included Gary Lane with 432 rushing yards, 770 passing yards, 1,202 yards of total offense, and 26 points scored, Earl Denny with 222 receiving yards, and Charlie Brown with 26 points scored.

1965 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1965 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1965 college football season. The selectors for the 1965 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1965 Missouri Tigers football team

The 1965 Missouri Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Missouri in the Big Eight Conference (Big 8) during the 1965 college football season. The team compiled an 8–2–1 record (6–1 against Big 8 opponents), finished in second place in the Big 8, defeated Florida in the 1966 Sugar Bowl, was ranked No. 6 in the final AP Poll, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 223 to 101. Dan Devine was the head coach for the eighth of 13 seasons. The team played its home games at Memorial Stadium in Columbia, Missouri.

The team's statistical leaders included Charlie Brown with 937 rushing yards, Gary Lane with 544 passing yards, 994 yards of total offense, and 54 point scored, and Monroe Phelps with 207 receiving yards.

1967 New York Giants season

The 1967 New York Giants season was the franchise's 43rd season in the National Football League. The Giants improved from 1–12–1 the previous season to 7–7, and finished in second place in the NFL Eastern Conference/Century Division.

1968 Green Bay Packers season

The 1968 Green Bay Packers season was their 50th season overall and the 48th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–7–1 record under first-year head coach Phil Bengston, earning them a third-place finish in the Central Division of the Western Conference. It was also the Packers' first losing season since 1958.

1971 Green Bay Packers season

The 1971 Green Bay Packers season was their 53rd season overall and their 51st season in the National Football League (NFL). The club posted a 4–8–2 record under first-year coach Dan Devine, earning them a fourth-place finish in the NFC Central division.

1986 Northwestern Wildcats football team

The 1986 Northwestern Wildcats team represented Northwestern University during the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first year under head coach Francis Peay, the Wildcats compiled a 4–7 record (2–6 against Big Ten Conference opponents) and finished in eighth place in the Big Ten Conference.The team's offensive leaders were quarterback Mike Greenfield with 1,653 passing yards, Stanley Davenport with 703 rushing yards, and Curtis Duncan with 437 receiving yards. Kicker John Duvic was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten player by the Associated Press, while tight end Rich Borresen received first-team All-Big Ten honors from the UPI.

1987 Northwestern Wildcats football team

The 1987 Northwestern Wildcats team represented Northwestern University during the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their second year under head coach Francis Peay, the Wildcats compiled a 2–8–1 record (2–6 against Big Ten Conference opponents) and finished in ninth place in the Big Ten Conference.The team's offensive leaders were quarterback Mike Greenfield with 1,265 passing yards, Byron Sanders with 778 rushing yards, and George Jones with 668 receiving yards.

1988 Northwestern Wildcats football team

The 1988 Northwestern Wildcats football team represented Northwestern University during the 1988 NCAA Division I-A football season. They participated as members of the Big Ten Conference and played their home games at Dyche Stadium in Evanston, Illinois. They were coached by Francis Peay.

1989 Northwestern Wildcats football team

The 1989 Northwestern Wildcats team represented Northwestern University during the 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth year under head coach Francis Peay, the Wildcats compiled a 0–11 record (0–8 against Big Ten Conference opponents) and finished in last place in the Big Ten Conference.The team's offensive leaders were quarterback Tim O'Brien with 2,218 passing yards, junior running back Bob Christian with 1,291 rushing yards, and Richard Buchanan with 1,115 receiving yards. Buchanan received first-team All-Big Ten honors from the Associated Press, and Christian received second-team honors.

1990 Northwestern Wildcats football team

The 1990 Northwestern Wildcats team represented Northwestern University during the 1990 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fifth year under head coach Francis Peay, the Wildcats compiled a 2–9 record (1–7 against Big Ten Conference opponents) and finished in last place in the Big Ten Conference.The team's offensive leaders were quarterback Len Williams with 1,700 passing yards, Bob Christian with 939 rushing yards, and Richard Buchanan with 834 receiving yards. Three Northwestern players received All-Big Ten honors in 1990: (1) wide receiver Richard Buchanan (AP-1); (2) defensive lineman Mel Agee (AP-1); and (3) defensive lineman Don Davey (AP-1).

1991 Northwestern Wildcats football team

The 1991 Northwestern Wildcats team represented Northwestern University during the 1991 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their sixth year under head coach Francis Peay, the Wildcats compiled a 3–8 record (2–6 against Big Ten Conference opponents) and finished in ninth place in the Big Ten Conference.The team's offensive leaders were quarterback Len Williams with 1,630 passing yards, Dennis Lundy with 568 rushing yards, and Mark Benson with 831 receiving yards.

1993 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1993 Indianapolis Colts season was the 41st season for the team in the National Football League and tenth in Indianapolis. The Indianapolis Colts finished the National Football League's 1993 season with a record of 4 wins and 12 losses, and finished fifth in the AFC East division. The Colts would get off to a fast 2-1 start. However, after that, the Colts would go into a tailspin for the rest of the season, losing 11 of their final 13 games. The Colts offense was really abysmal during the season, as they would only score 189 points all season, the fewest in the league, and 3 of their 4 wins were by a 9 to 6 tally. Their only other win with not such a score was their 23-10 win over the Cleveland Browns in week 4. For the first and only time in league history, all NFL teams played their 16-game schedule over a span of 18 weeks.

Alton Johnson

Alton Francis Johnson (born 1877, date of death unknown) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Northwestern University for one season in 1908, compiling a record of 2–2. This ranks him 22nd at Northwestern in total wins and tenth at Northwestern in winning percentage. Johnson was born in Chicago, Illinois.

List of Northwestern Wildcats football seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Northwestern Wildcats football team of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS). Since the team's creation in 1882, the Wildcats have participated in more than 1,100 officially sanctioned games, including 9 bowl games.

Northwestern originally competed as a football independent. As one of the founding members, Northwestern joined the Big Ten conference, then known as the Western Conference, in 1896, where it has been a member ever since.

The Wildcats have experienced futility for much of its existence. The team has several winless seasons, including setting a NCAA Division I record for consecutive losses when it lost 34 straight games from 1979 to 1982. The Wildcats went 64 years without winning a bowl game after the 1949 Rose Bowl. Northwestern has also experienced success, winning eight conference titles.

List of University of Missouri Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame Inductees

The list consists of inductees into the University of Missouri Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame.

Paul Noyes

Marshall Paul Noyes (October 13, 1870 – September 6, 1946) was an American football player and coach. He served as the first head football coach at Northwestern University, coaching one season in 1893 and compiling a record of 2–5–3.

Peay

Peay may refer to:

Austin Peay (1876–1927), Governor of Tennessee from 1923 until his death in 1927

Clint Peay (born 1973), retired U.S. soccer defender and head coach

Francis Peay (born 1944), retired American football offensive tackle and head coach

J. H. Binford Peay III (born 1940), retired four-star General from the United States Army

W. H. Bannard

William Heath Bannard (March 6, 1875 – March 22, 1913) was an American football player and coach. He served as the fifth head football coach at Northwestern University, coaching one season in 1898 and compiling a record of 9–4–1. This ranks him 17th at Northwestern in total wins and second at Northwestern in winning percentage. He died of Bright's disease in 1913.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.