Foxborough, Massachusetts

Foxborough is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States, about 22 miles (35 km) southwest of Boston, 18 miles (29 km) northeast of Providence, Rhode Island and about 73 miles (117 km) northwest of Cape Cod. Foxborough is part of the Boston metropolitan statistical area. The population was 16,865 at the 2010 census.

"Foxborough" is the official spelling of the town name,[2] although the alternative spelling "Foxboro" is also frequently used. This alternative spelling is used by the United States Postal Service as the correct form by which to address mail to recipients in the town although both can be processed by their system. The sign on the post office reads "Foxboro".

The town is best known as the site of Gillette Stadium, home of the New England Patriots of the National Football League and the New England Revolution of Major League Soccer.

Foxborough, Massachusetts

Foxboro
Gillette Stadium, Memorial Hall, Patriot Place, sign in Foxborough, Congregational Church and the Orpheum Theatre
Gillette Stadium, Memorial Hall, Patriot Place, sign in Foxborough, Congregational Church and the Orpheum Theatre
Official seal of Foxborough, Massachusetts

Seal
Nickname(s): 
The Gem of Norfolk County
Location in Norfolk County in Massachusetts
Location in Norfolk County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°03′55″N 71°14′54″W / 42.06528°N 71.24833°W
CountryUnited States
StateMassachusetts
CountyNorfolk
Settled1704
IncorporatedJune 10, 1778
Government
 • TypeOpen town meeting
Area
 • Total20.9 sq mi (54.1 km2)
 • Land20.1 sq mi (52.0 km2)
 • Water0.8 sq mi (2.1 km2)
Elevation
289 ft (88 m)
Population
(2010)[1]
 • Total16,693
 • Density800/sq mi (310/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (Eastern)
ZIP code
02035
Area code(s)508 / 774
FIPS code25-24820
GNIS feature ID0618320
Websitewww.foxboroughma.gov

History

Main Street, Foxborough, MA
Main Street c. 1906

Settled in 1704 and incorporated in 1778, the town of Foxborough was named for Charles James Fox, a Whig member of Parliament and a staunch supporter of the Colonies in the years leading up to the American Revolution.

The town was once home to the world's largest straw hat factory. Founded by local businessman E.P. Carpenter, the Union Straw Works burned to the ground in the early 20th century. The town post office now stands on the site.

Foxborough was composed of small neighborhood communities until the early 1900s. These included Foxvale/Paineburgh, which remained semi-independent until the early twentieth century; Quaker Hill in South Foxborough; and Lakeview/Donkeyville in West Foxborough.

Schaefer Stadium (later known as Sullivan Stadium, then Foxboro Stadium) opened in 1971 as the home of the New England Patriots, after the football team spent its first eleven seasons playing at various stadiums in Boston. The family of Billy Sullivan owned both the Patriots and the stadium until they sold the team in 1988. The stadium, however, lapsed into bankruptcy and was then bought by paper magnate Robert Kraft. With Kraft in control of Foxboro Stadium, he prevented the Patriots from relocating to St. Louis in 1994 by refusing to let the team break their lease, then bought the Patriots outright. Kraft then founded the New England Revolution, one of the charter clubs of Major League Soccer, in 1996.

Gillette Stadium opened in 2002 as a replacement for Foxboro Stadium. The Patriot Place shopping plaza, built on land surrounding the stadium bought by Kraft, completed construction in 2009. The plaza includes a variety of restaurants, clothing stores, and other retailers.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 20.9 sq mi (54.1 km2), of which 20.1 sq mi (52.0 km2) is land and 0.81 sq mi (2.1 km2) (3.88%) is water.

Foxborough is located at 42°3′54″N 71°14′52″W / 42.06500°N 71.24778°W (42.065248, -71.247856).[3]

For the purposes of the United States Census Bureau, the built-up central area of Foxborough known as the Foxborough Census Designated Place (CDP) has a total area of 7.6 km² (3.0 mi²). 7.5 km² (2.9 mi²) of it is land and 0.1 km² (0.1 mi²) of it (1.69%) is water.

Climate

Foxborough, Massachusetts
Climate chart (explanation)
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
3.8
 
 
36
18
 
 
3.7
 
 
40
21
 
 
4.8
 
 
48
28
 
 
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59
37
 
 
3.7
 
 
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47
 
 
4.1
 
 
78
57
 
 
3.9
 
 
83
62
 
 
3.9
 
 
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61
 
 
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53
 
 
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62
42
 
 
4.5
 
 
52
33
 
 
4.5
 
 
41
24
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches

Foxborough's climate is humid continental (Köppen: Dfa) with four distinct seasons, which is the predominant climate for Massachusetts and New England.[4] Summers are typically warm to hot, rainy, and humid, while winters are cold, windy, and snowy. Spring and fall are usually mild, but conditions are widely varied, depending on wind direction and jet stream positioning. The warmest month is July, with an average high temperature of 83 °F and an average low temperature of 62 °F. The coldest month is January, with an average high temperature of 36 °F and an average low temperature of 18 °F. Periods exceeding 90 °F in summer and below 10 °F in winter are not uncommon but rarely extended, with about 14 days per year seeing the former extreme. Because of the town's relatively short distance from the Atlantic Ocean, temperatures tend to remain warmer than locations further inland. Like the rest of the northeastern seaboard, precipitation is distributed fairly evenly throughout the entire year, with the winter months receiving slightly more precipitation than the summer months. Powerful storm systems known as Nor'easters can produce heavy amounts of rain and snow at any time of the year, but these storms most often strike during the winter months, causing significant snowfall amounts and blizzard conditions. Thunderstorms occur somewhat frequently in the summer, occasionally bringing heavy downpours, damaging winds, and hail. Tornado activity is relatively low in the area, although there have been a fair share of tornado warnings issued over the years. Due to its location along the United States eastern seaboard, Foxborough is somewhat vulnerable to Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms that threaten the region from late summer into early autumn.

Demographics

Entire town

Historical population
YearPop.±%
18501,880—    
18602,879+53.1%
18703,057+6.2%
18802,950−3.5%
18902,933−0.6%
19003,266+11.4%
19103,863+18.3%
19204,136+7.1%
19305,347+29.3%
19406,303+17.9%
19507,030+11.5%
196010,136+44.2%
197014,218+40.3%
198014,148−0.5%
199014,637+3.5%
200016,246+11.0%
201016,865+3.8%
* = population estimate.
Source: United States Census records and Population Estimates Program data.[7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16]

As of the census[17] of 2000, there were 16,246 people, 6,141 households, and 4,396 families residing in the town. The population density was 809.1 people per square mile (312.4/km2). There were 6,299 housing units at an average density of 313.7 per square mile (121.1/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 97.09% White, 0.82% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 1.22% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.20% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.06% of the population.

There were 6,141 households out of which 35.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.9% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.4% were non-families. 23.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the town, the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 32.1% from 25 to 44, 24.5% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $64,323, and the median income for a family was $78,811. Based on data from the 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, these figures have risen to $92,370 as the median income for a household in the town and $108,209 as the median income for a family.[18][19][20] Males had a median income of $51,901 versus $35,748 for females. The per capita income for the town was $32,294, but this figure has risen to $42,236. About 2.3% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

Foxborough CDP

The built-up central business district is designated by the United States Census Bureau as the Foxborough Census Designated Place for record keeping purposes (this is common among many larger population New England towns.)

As of the census[17] of 2000, there were 5,509 people, 2,486 households, and 1,372 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 730.9/km² (1,895.7/mi²). There were 2,576 housing units at an average density of 341.8/km² (886.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.57% White, 1.42% Black or African American, 0.13% Native American, 1.07% Asian, 0.29% from other races, and 0.53% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.60% of the population.

There were 2,486 households out of which 25.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.9% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.8% were non-families. 37.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the CDP, the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 35.0% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 16.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.6 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $50,431, and the median income for a family was $58,924. Males had a median income of $42,030 versus $35,370 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $31,245. About 4.1% of families and 5.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.4% of those under age 18 and 8.7% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Foxborough is run by a five-member board of selectmen and elected town officials like the town moderator and town clerk. Day-to-day operations involving items under the Board of Selectmen's purview is handled by an appointed Town Manager.

Board of Selectmen (Term Ends)

  • David Feldman, Chairman (2021)
  • Chris Mitchell, Vice-Chairman (2022)
  • Mark Elfman, Clerk (2019)
  • Leah Gibson (2022)
  • James DeVellis (2019)

Other town officials

  • William G. Keegan Jr. (Town Manager)
  • Mary Beth Bernard (Assistant Town Manager)
  • Robert E. Cutler Jr. (Town Clerk)
  • Peter Solbo (Highway Supervisor)
  • Roger Hill (Department of Public Works)
  • Paige Duncan (Town Planner)
  • Nicholas Riccio (Building Commissioner)
  • Pauline Clifford (Health Agent)
  • Jane Sears Pierce (Conservation Manager)
  • Bob Boette (Conservation Commission Chairman)
  • Robert B. Worthley (Water and Sewer Superintendent)
  • Randy Scollins (Finance Director)
  • Roger P. Hatfield (Fire Chief)
  • William D. Baker (Police Chief)
  • Michael Johns (Veteran's Agent)
  • Jennifer A. Savickis (Historical Commission Chairman)
  • Deborah Giardino (Recreation Director)
  • Hannelore Simonds (Chief Assessor)
  • Amy Berdos (Superintendent of Schools)

The Town Hall is located at 40 South Street, Foxborough, MA 02035.

Education

Public schools

Foxborough has a public school system. The Foxborough Public Schools (FPS) district currently has an enrollment of over 3,000 children in grades from pre-school to grade 12.

Foxborough public schools:

Foxborough High School offers a wide variety of sports including: golf, track and field, football, soccer, cross country, volleyball, swim, basketball, wrestling, hockey, indoor track, cheerleading, lacrosse, baseball, tennis, and softball.

The mascot of the high school is the Warriors, whose colors are blue and gold.

The football team has won the Hockomock League title and also won the Division 2 Super Bowl various times, most recently in 2007 with a 21–10 victory over Burlington. Coincidentally, the Super Bowl win also gave coach Jack Martinelli his 200th win. During the 1987 and 1988 seasons, the Warriors won back to back Division 3 Super Bowls and went undefeated in 1988. This team featured 5 players that went on to play Division 1 college football (Chris Cady, Eric Matckie, Tom Nalen, Dan Sullivan, Rob Turenne). The cheerleading team has also earned recognition, making it to nationals for the first time in 2004 and then again in 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008.

The golf team has produced many all-scholastic players and even state champions, as has the wrestling team. The boys' indoor track team were the Hockomock Champions in the 2006/2007 season. The field hockey team have been the Hockomock Champions several times in recent years.

Foxborough High School is also known for its music program, which includes a string orchestra, symphony orchestra, chorus, marching band, concert band, symphonic winds, winds ensemble and jazz band/choir. Many of these groups regularly place in competitions, but the Jazz Ensemble has been recognized in several Essentially Ellington competitions. The top 15 Jazz bands in the country send in recordings of themselves and judges judge the bands. Foxborough is known for being in the top 15 for several years.

Private schools

Points of interest

Foxborough Hall
Memorial Hall
  • Foxboro Grange Hall, a National Historic Register place, added in 1983
  • Gillette Stadium – Home of the New England Patriots and the New England Revolution.
  • Patriot Place – An outdoor shopping and entertainment complex next to Gillette Stadium.
  • Orpheum Theater – A local non-profit theater which serves as the home to Bay Colony Productions, a local community theater company, as well as the venue for other live performances and movies, including the annual Three Stooges film festival.
  • F. Gilbert Hills State Forest – Encompassing 1,027 acres (4.16 km2) in Foxborough and Wrentham, the state forest is used for hiking, biking, cross country skiing, horseback riding, and observing nature. Contained on state forest land are some unique stone structures that some believe were made and used by the native Algonquin tribes prior to the town's founding.[21]
  • Memorial Hall – a stone building and monument in the center of town, formerly housing the library, now dedicated to those who served in the armed forces, containing a permanent collection of historical artifacts relating to town history.

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "Population and Housing Occupancy Status: 2010 – State – County Subdivision, 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-07-03.
  2. ^ MA, Foxborough,. "The Official Site of Foxborough, MA". Retrieved 14 June 2016.
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  4. ^ Peel, M. C.; Finlayson, B. L.; McMahon, T. A. (2007). "Updated world map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification". Hydrology and Earth System Sciences. 11 (5): 1633–1644. doi:10.5194/hess-11-1633-2007.
  5. ^ Average weather for Foxboro Weather Channel'.' Retrieved March 29, 2008.
  6. ^ "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved March 8, 2014.
  7. ^ "Total Population (P1), 2010 Census Summary File 1". American FactFinder, All County Subdivisions within Massachusetts. United States Census Bureau. 2010.
  8. ^ "Massachusetts by Place and County Subdivision - GCT-T1. Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  9. ^ "1990 Census of Population, General Population Characteristics: Massachusetts" (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1990. Table 76: General Characteristics of Persons, Households, and Families: 1990. 1990 CP-1-23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  10. ^ "1980 Census of the Population, Number of Inhabitants: Massachusetts" (PDF). US Census Bureau. December 1981. Table 4. Populations of County Subdivisions: 1960 to 1980. PC80-1-A23. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  11. ^ "1950 Census of Population" (PDF). Bureau of the Census. 1952. Section 6, Pages 21-10 and 21-11, Massachusetts Table 6. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1930 to 1950. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  12. ^ "1920 Census of Population" (PDF). Bureau of the Census. Number of Inhabitants, by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions. Pages 21-5 through 21-7. Massachusetts Table 2. Population of Counties by Minor Civil Divisions: 1920, 1910, and 1920. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  13. ^ "1890 Census of the Population" (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. Pages 179 through 182. Massachusetts Table 5. Population of States and Territories by Minor Civil Divisions: 1880 and 1890. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  14. ^ "1870 Census of the Population" (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1872. Pages 217 through 220. Table IX. Population of Minor Civil Divisions, &c. Massachusetts. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  15. ^ "1860 Census" (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1864. Pages 220 through 226. State of Massachusetts Table No. 3. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  16. ^ "1850 Census" (PDF). Department of the Interior, Census Office. 1854. Pages 338 through 393. Populations of Cities, Towns, &c. Retrieved July 12, 2011.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  18. ^ "SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-26.
  19. ^ "ACS DEMOGRAPHIC AND HOUSING ESTIMATES 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-26.
  20. ^ "HOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-26.
  21. ^ "StoneSites.Net / About This Site". Retrieved 14 June 2016.
  22. ^ Nast, Condé. "Rob Gronkowski Says Women Have Wanted Him Since the Fourth Grade". GQ. Retrieved 2019-03-04.
  23. ^ "Education: Massachusetts Yankee". Time. May 30, 1949. Retrieved May 2, 2010.
  24. ^ "NFL Players Association - NFLPA Homepage". Retrieved 14 June 2016.
  25. ^ "Press Releases - Sesame Workshop". Retrieved 14 June 2016.
  26. ^ Butterfield, Fox (1 October 2001). "Nguyen Van Thieu Is Dead at 76; Last President of South Vietnam". Retrieved 14 June 2016 – via NYTimes.com.

External links

2012 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship

The 2012 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship was the 42nd annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national championship for National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's college lacrosse. Sixteen teams were selected to compete in the tournament based upon their performance during the regular season, and for some, by means of a conference tournament automatic qualifier.

2016 NHL Winter Classic

The 2016 NHL Winter Classic (officially the 2016 Bridgestone NHL Winter Classic) was an outdoor regular season National Hockey League (NHL) game, part of the Winter Classic series, played on January 1, 2016. The game, the eighth Winter Classic, saw the Montreal Canadiens defeat the Boston Bruins, 5–1, at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts, a significant event in one of the NHL's best-known rivalries. A Bruins and Canadiens alumni game was also played on December 31, 2015. The Boston Pride women's professional hockey team played before the alumni game against Les Canadiennes of the Canadian Women's Hockey League to a 1–1 tie in the first ever 2016 Outdoor Women's Classic (officially the Outdoor Women's Classic presented by Scotiabank).

2016 Outdoor Women's Classic

The 2016 Outdoor Women's Classic presented by Scotiabank was an ice hockey game played on December 31, 2015, at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts, between the Boston Pride of the National Women's Hockey League and Les Canadiennes of the Canadian Women's Hockey League. It was the first outdoor ice hockey game between professional women's teams; it ended in a 1–1 tie. The game was played one day before the 2016 NHL Winter Classic, between the Boston Bruins and Montreal Canadiens.

2018 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship

The 2018 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship weekend was the 48th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national championship for National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's college lacrosse.

Seventeen teams competed in the tournament, based upon their performance during the regular season. For nine teams, entry into the tournament was by means of a conference tournament automatic qualifier and/or play in, while for eight teams at-large selection was determined by the NCAA selection committee.

Yale controlled the finals, winning their first NCAA lacrosse title and second title overall. Ben Reeves tied Eamon McEneaney for most points in an NCAA tournament with 25 points. Duke had not lost in a championship game since 2007.

Bungay River

The Bungay River is a short river in southeastern Massachusetts that is a tributary of the Ten Mile River.

The Bungay River begins in Witch Pond in Foxborough, Massachusetts at an altitude of about 157 feet (48 m) above sea level. It flows south through Greenwood Lake and through North Attleboro and Attleboro. It enters the Ten Mile River in Attleboro and ultimately empties into Narragansett Bay. It is 7.2 miles (11.6 km) long.According to published judgments by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, the river flows through the best red maple swamp in Massachusetts and provides some of the best canoeing across the state. It and surrounding wetlands are under study as wildlife preservation areas.

Cocasset River

The Cocasset River is a small river in Foxborough, Massachusetts. It flows approximately 4.7 miles (7.5 km) in a southwesterly direction to where it joins the Wading River near Green Street. It is a tributary of the Taunton River.

Foxboro Stadium

Foxboro Stadium, originally Schaefer Stadium and later Sullivan Stadium, was an outdoor stadium located in Foxborough, Massachusetts, United States. It opened in 1971 and served as the home of the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL) until 2001 and also as the home venue for the New England Revolution of Major League Soccer (MLS) from 1996 to 2001. The stadium was the site of several games in both the 1994 FIFA World Cup and the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup which the U.S. won. Foxboro Stadium was demolished in 2002 and replaced by Gillette Stadium and the Patriot Place shopping center.

Foxborough Regional Charter School

The Foxborough Regional Charter School is a college prep, K through 12, charter school located in Foxborough, Massachusetts.

Henry Bradford Nason

Henry Bradford Nason (born in Foxborough, Massachusetts, 22 June 1831; died in Troy, New York, 18 January 1895) was a United States chemist.

Jeremy Collins

Jeremy Collins (born April 20, 1978) is a firefighter from Foxborough, Massachusetts. He is the winner of Survivor: Cambodia, and had previously placed tenth on Survivor: San Juan del Sur, where he competed alongside his wife Val.

Kraft Group

The Kraft Group, LLC, is a group of privately held companies in the professional sports, manufacturing, and real estate development industries doing business in 90 countries. Founded in 1998 by American businessman Robert Kraft as a holding company, it is based in Foxborough, Massachusetts.

MLS Cup 1999

MLS Cup 1999, the fourth edition of Major League Soccer's championship match, was played between D.C. United and the Los Angeles Galaxy to decide the champion of the 1999 season. The match took place at Foxboro Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts on November 21, 1999. D.C. United defeated Los Angeles 2–0 with goals from Ben Olsen and Jaime Moreno during the first half. A rematch of the first MLS Cup- coincidentally held on the same venue- D.C. United captured their third MLS Cup victory in the first four years of Major League Soccer's existence and second victory against the Galaxy in an MLS Cup.

American referee Tim Weyland was selected to officiate the match. Christina Aguilera performed at the halftime show.

Neponset Reservoir

The Neponset Reservoir is a reservoir located in Foxborough, Massachusetts that is the headwater of the Neponset River that runs to Boston Harbor. The reservoir dates from the mid-1800s, and was originally used by mills downstream for water power.

New England Revolution

The New England Revolution is an American professional soccer club based in the Greater Boston area that competes in Major League Soccer (MLS), in the Eastern Conference of the league. It is one of the ten charter clubs of MLS, having competed in the league since its inaugural season.

The club is owned by Robert Kraft, who also owns the New England Patriots along with his son, Jonathan Kraft. The name "Revolution" refers to the New England region's significant involvement in the American Revolution that took place from 1775–1783.

New England currently play their home matches at Gillette Stadium in the town of Foxborough, Massachusetts, which is located 21 miles (34 km) southwest of downtown Boston, Massachusetts. The club played their home games at the adjacent and now-demolished Foxboro Stadium, from 1996 until 2001. The Revs hold the distinction of being the only original MLS team to have every league game in its history televised.The Revolution won their first major trophy in the 2007 U.S. Open Cup. The following year, they won the 2008 North American SuperLiga. The Revolution have participated in five MLS Cup finals in 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2014. They also placed second in the 2005 regular season. However, they have never won an MLS Cup or MLS Supporters' Shield.

New England Tea Men

The New England Tea Men were a soccer team based in Foxborough, Massachusetts in the Boston metropolitan area. They played in the North American Soccer League (NASL) from 1978 to 1980. Their home field was Schaefer Stadium. They also played one season of indoor soccer in the NASL, using the Providence Civic Center for home games.

The Tea Men were owned by tea company Lipton, who gave them their unusual name, which recalled both the company's tie-in and the Boston Tea Party. They won their division in 1978 and made a further playoff run in 1980. However, the team struggled for financial solvency in Massachusetts. Right at the start of the 1980–81 indoor season they relocated to Jacksonville, Florida and became the Jacksonville Tea Men.

Patriot Place

Patriot Place is an open-air shopping center owned by The Kraft Group. It is located in Foxborough, Massachusetts, built around Gillette Stadium, the home of the New England Patriots and New England Revolution.

The first phase opened in fall 2007, which included the construction of a small strip mall. The second phase is built on what were parking lots for Gillette Stadium, which in turn were previously the site of the now-demolished Foxboro Stadium. Phase two of Patriot Place is also home to one of the first locations for Showcase Cinemas' Cinema de Lux brand.

Snowplow Game

In National Football League lore, the Snowplow Game was a regular-season game played between the Miami Dolphins and New England Patriots on December 12, 1982, at Schaefer Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts. The stadium's snowplow operator, Mark Henderson, cleared a spot on the snowy field specifically for New England kicker John Smith so he could kick the game-winning field goal to give the Patriots a 3–0 win.

Tom Nalen

Thomas Andrew Nalen (born May 13, 1971) is a former American football center who played for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He was born in Boston and raised in Foxborough, Massachusetts.

Tuck Rule Game

The 2001 AFC Divisional Playoff game between the New England Patriots and the Oakland Raiders, also known as the Snow Bowl and the Tuck Rule Game, took place on January 19, 2002, at Foxboro Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts, the former home stadium of the Patriots. This was also the final game ever played at Foxboro Stadium, and was played under a heavy snowfall. The Patriots moved to Gillette Stadium the following season. To Raiders fans it is known as The New England Snow Job.

The name Tuck Rule Game originates from the controversial game-changing play. In the play, Raiders' cornerback Charles Woodson sacked Patriots' quarterback Tom Brady, which in turn, initially appeared to cause a fumble that was eventually recovered by Raiders' linebacker Greg Biekert, and, if it was a fumble, would have almost certainly sealed the game for Oakland. Officials reviewed the play, and eventually determined that even though Brady had seemingly halted his passing motion and was attempting to "tuck" the ball back into his body, it was an incomplete pass and not a fumble under the then-effective NFL rules. As a result, the original call was overturned, and the ball was given back to the Patriots, who subsequently moved the ball into field goal range.

With under a minute remaining in regulation, Patriots' placekicker Adam Vinatieri kicked a 45-yard field goal to tie the game at 13, which sent the game into overtime. In the subsequent overtime, Vinatieri kicked a 23-yard field goal to win the game for the Patriots. New England went on to win Super Bowl XXXVI, beginning a run of championships with Brady and head coach Bill Belichick, appearing in nine and winning six to date.

Metric conversion
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
96
 
 
2
−8
 
 
93
 
 
4
−6
 
 
122
 
 
9
−2
 
 
112
 
 
15
3
 
 
93
 
 
21
8
 
 
104
 
 
26
14
 
 
99
 
 
28
17
 
 
99
 
 
27
16
 
 
93
 
 
23
12
 
 
110
 
 
17
6
 
 
113
 
 
11
1
 
 
115
 
 
5
−4
Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm
Climate data for Foxborough, Massachusetts
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 68
(20)
70
(21)
90
(32)
96
(36)
96
(36)
97
(36)
102
(39)
102
(39)
97
(36)
87
(31)
78
(26)
76
(24)
102
(39)
Average high °F (°C) 36
(2)
40
(4)
48
(9)
59
(15)
70
(21)
78
(26)
83
(28)
81
(27)
73
(23)
62
(17)
52
(11)
41
(5)
60.25
(15.69)
Average low °F (°C) 18
(−8)
21
(−6)
28
(−2)
37
(3)
47
(8)
57
(14)
62
(17)
61
(16)
53
(12)
42
(6)
33
(1)
24
(−4)
40.25
(4.58)
Record low °F (°C) −19
(−28)
−16
(−27)
−4
(−20)
14
(−10)
28
(−2)
37
(3)
42
(6)
39
(4)
30
(−1)
20
(−7)
4
(−16)
−14
(−26)
−19
(−28)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.78
(96)
3.68
(93)
4.81
(122)
4.39
(112)
3.65
(93)
4.08
(104)
3.91
(99)
3.91
(99)
3.66
(93)
4.35
(110)
4.46
(113)
4.52
(115)
49.2
(1,250)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 15.0
(38)
11.9
(30)
9.6
(24)
2.6
(6.6)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.2
(0.51)
2.1
(5.3)
11.5
(29)
52.8
(134)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 11.0 9.5 11.6 11.8 12.3 11.3 10.2 9.4 8.9 10.1 11.3 11.1 128.5
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 7.3 5.9 4.8 1.1 0 0 0 0 0 0.2 1.2 5.2 25.7
Mean monthly sunshine hours 164.3 169.5 213.9 228.0 266.6 288.0 300.7 275.9 237.0 207.7 144.0 142.6 2,638.2
Source #1: Weather Channel[5]
Source #2: NOAA (extremes 1904–present),[6]
Municipalities and communities of Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States
Cities
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villages
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Cities and towns
100k-250k
Cities and towns
25k-100k
Cities and towns
10k-25k
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