Fox Cities

The Fox Cities of Northeastern Wisconsin are the cities, towns and villages along the Fox River as it flows from Lake Winnebago northward into Green Bay.

The Fox Cities communities, as defined by its Chamber of Commerce and Convention and Visitors Bureau, include:[1]

Major points of interest include the Fox Cities Exhibition Center, Fox Cities Performing Arts Center, High Cliff State Park, and Neuroscience Group Field at Fox Cities Stadium. The Fox River Mall is the largest shopping mall in the state at 1.2 million square feet.[2]

Area post-secondary schools include Fox Valley Technical College, Lawrence University, and the University of Wisconsin–Fox Valley.

Bus transit for the area is provided by Valley Transit and commercial airline service is provided by Appleton International Airport.

Major highway routes in the area include: Interstate 41/U.S. Route 41, which connects the Fox Cities with Green Bay and Milwaukee; Wisconsin Highway 441, known locally as the Tri-County Expressway, which is an auxiliary highway of Interstate 41 that serves as a beltway around Appleton; and U.S. Route 10 which travels east-west, connecting the Fox Cities with Stevens Point/Waupaca and Manitowoc.

Coordinates: 44°14′04″N 88°26′24″W / 44.2344°N 88.4401°W

Fox Cities
Coordinates: 44°14′04″N 88°26′24″W / 44.2344°N 88.4401°W
CountryUnited States
State(s)Wisconsin
Largest cityAppleton, Wisconsin
Other cities

Combined Statistical Area

The Fox Cities constitute a portion of the Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah, WI Combined Statistical Area (CSA), which also includes the City of Oshkosh and rural portions of Calumet, Outagamie and Winnebago Counties. As of the 2010 Census, the CSA had a population of 392,660 (2017 estimate: 406,540)[3], making it the third largest CSA in Wisconsin, behind Milwaukee and Madison.

References

  1. ^ "Communities". www.foxcities.org. Retrieved 2019-02-08.
  2. ^ "The Buzz: Fox River Mall turns 30". Retrieved 2016-09-06.
  3. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017 - United States -- Combined Statistical Area; and for Puerto Rico". United States Census Bureau, Population Division. February 2019. Retrieved February 8, 2019.

External links

Appleton, Wisconsin

Appleton is a city in Outagamie (mostly), Calumet, and Winnebago counties in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. One of the Fox Cities, it is situated on the Fox River, 30 miles (48 km) southwest of Green Bay and 100 miles (160 km) north of Milwaukee. Appleton is the county seat of Outagamie County. The population was 72,623 at the 2010 census. Of this, 60,045 were in Outagamie County, 11,088 in Calumet County, and 1,490 in Winnebago County. Appleton is the principal city of the Appleton, Wisconsin Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah, Wisconsin Combined Statistical Area. The city possesses the two tallest buildings in Outagamie County, the Zuelke Building and 222 Building, at 168 and 183 feet, respectively.

Appleton serves as the heart of the Fox River Valley, and is home to the Fox Cities Exhibition Center, Fox Cities Performing Arts Center, Fox River Mall, Neuroscience Group Field at Fox Cities Stadium, Appleton International Airport, and the Valley's two major hospitals: St. Elizabeth Hospital and ThedaCare Regional Medical Center–Appleton. It also hosts a large number of regional events such as its Flag Day parade, Christmas parade, Octoberfest and others.

Bill Melton

William Edwin Melton (born July 7, 1945), nicknamed "Beltin' Bill" or "Beltin' Melton", is an American former professional baseball player and current television sports commentator. He played as a third baseman in Major League Baseball from 1968 through 1977 for the Chicago White Sox, California Angels and Cleveland Indians. He is now a commentator for NBC Sports Chicago White Sox broadcasts.

Boog Powell

John Wesley "Boog" Powell (born August 17, 1941) is an American former professional baseball first baseman and left fielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians and the Los Angeles Dodgers between 1961 and 1977. He was with the Orioles’ World Series Champion teams in 1966 and 1970, the American League Champion teams in 1966, 1969, 1970 and 1971, and the American League East Division Champion teams in 1969, 1970, 1971, 1973 and 1974. The four-time All-Star won the American League's Most Valuable Player award in 1970 and in 1964 posted a .606 slugging percentage to lead the American League.

Cal Ripken Sr.

Calvin Edwin Ripken (December 17, 1935 – March 25, 1999) was a coach and manager in Major League Baseball who spent 36 years in the Baltimore Orioles organization, also as a player and scout. He played in the Orioles' farm system beginning in 1957, and later served as manager of the parent club, on which his sons Cal Jr. and Billy played.

Born near Aberdeen, Maryland, which he called home throughout his life, Ripken joined the Baltimore Orioles in 1957 as a minor league player. He would spend the next 36 years in the organization, mainly as a coach, with only one season and seven games coming as a manager. As a manager in the minor leagues for 13 years, Ripken won 964 games, and later compiled a 68-101 record managing the Orioles. Several of his students, including Jim Palmer, Eddie Murray, and most prominently his son Cal Jr., went on to Hall of Fame careers. He was credited for helping sculpt his team's tradition of excellence known as "The Oriole Way."

Dave McNally

David Arthur McNally (October 31, 1942 – December 1, 2002) was a Major League Baseball left-handed starting pitcher from 1962 until 1975. He was signed by the Baltimore Orioles and played with them every season except for his final season with the Montreal Expos.

Dean Chance

Wilmer Dean Chance (June 1, 1941 – October 11, 2015) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a right-handed pitcher. During his 11-year major league career, he played for the Los Angeles Angels, Minnesota Twins, Cleveland Indians, New York Mets, and Detroit Tigers. With a touch of wildness and the habit of never looking at home plate once he received the sign from his catcher, Chance would turn his back fully towards the hitter in mid-windup before spinning and unleashing a good fastball, sinker or sidearm curveball.In 1964, Chance became at the time the youngest pitcher to win the Cy Young Award when, as a member of the Los Angeles Angels, he led the American League in wins (20), innings pitched (278​1⁄3) and earned run average (1.65—as of 2015, a franchise record) and was third in the A.L. in strikeouts. He pitched 11 shutouts (also a franchise record as of 2015) that season, winning five of those by a 1–0 score. At the time, only one Cy Young Award was given in all of MLB; since 1967, separate awards have been given in the AL and the National League. Chance's Cy Young Award was the third in a string of five consecutive Cy Young Awards won by a pitcher from a Los Angeles-based team. The others were won by Dodger pitchers: Don Drysdale in 1962 and Sandy Koufax in 1963, 1965, and 1966.

Earl Weaver

Earl Sidney Weaver (August 14, 1930 – January 19, 2013) was an American professional baseball player, Hall of Fame Major League manager, author, and television broadcaster. After playing in minor league baseball, he retired without playing in Major League Baseball (MLB). He became a minor league manager, and then managed in MLB for 17 years with the Baltimore Orioles (1968–82; 1985–86). Weaver's style of managing was summed up in the quote: "pitching, defense, and the three-run homer." He did not believe in placing emphasis on "small ball" tactics such as stolen bases, hit and run plays, or sacrifice bunts. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1996.

Fox Cities Roller Derby

Fox Cities Roller Derby, formerly known as The Fox City Foxz, is a women's flat track roller derby league based in Appleton, Wisconsin. Founded in 2007, the league consists of two travel teams which compete against teams from other leagues. Fox Cities is a member of the Women's Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA).

Fox Crossing, Wisconsin

Fox Crossing is a village in Winnebago County, Wisconsin, United States. It was incorporated from the former Town of Menasha in 2016. The estimated population in 2018 was 19,029.Fox Crossing is located in the Fox Cities region and the Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah, WI CSA, the third largest metropolitan area in Wisconsin.

Fox River (Green Bay tributary)

The Fox River is a river in eastern Wisconsin in the Great Lakes region of the United States. It is the principal tributary of the Bay of Green Bay, and via the Bay, the largest tributary of Lake Michigan. The well-known city of Green Bay, one of the first European settlements in North America, is on the river at its mouth on lower Green Bay.

Hydrographers divide the Fox into two distinct sections, the Upper Fox River, flowing from its headwaters in south central Wisconsin northeasterly into Lake Winnebago, and the Lower Fox River, flowing from Lake Winnebago northeasterly to lower Green Bay. Together, the two sections give the Fox River a length of 182 miles (293 km). Counting the distance through Lake Winnebago gives a total of 200 miles (322 km).The river's name is the English translation of the French name for a local Native American tribe in the 17th century. The river was part of the famous 1673-74 expedition of Jolliet and Marquette, in which they went on to become the first Europeans to traverse the upper Mississippi River. A particular set of cities on the lower Fox River identify themselves as the "Fox Cities".

Friendship State Trail

The Friendship Trail is a recreation trail in northeastern Wisconsin. The trail is used by walkers, hikers, bikers, horseback riders, and snowmobilers during the winter months. Two sections of the trail are complete: ~14 miles from Winchester east to Fox Crossing and ~4.4 miles from Forest Junction southeast to Brillion. The route consists of asphalt, crushed stone, and wood surfaces. The entire route is located in Winnebago County and Calumet County.

NCAA Division III Baseball Tournament

The NCAA Division III Baseball Tournament is an annual college baseball tournament held at the culmination of the spring regular season to determine the NCAA Division III baseball champion. The tournament has been played since 1976, soon after the formation of Division III. Most of the 56 teams who qualify do so by winning an automatic bid that comes along with their conference's championship; others receive at-large bids. The initial round consists of six- and eight-team regionals held at pre-selected sites in eight regions: New England, New York, Mid-Atlantic, South, Mideast, Midwest, Central, and West. The eight regional champions advance to the final round of the Division III Baseball Championship tournament,

which will be hosted at Veterans Memorial Stadium in Cedar Rapids, Iowa in 2019. The event was formerly held at Fox Cities Stadium in Grand Chute, Wisconsin, just outside of Appleton until 2018.

In both the regional and final rounds, the tournament uses a "double elimination" format, in which teams must lose twice to be eliminated.

Neuroscience Group Field at Fox Cities Stadium

Neuroscience Group Field at Fox Cities Stadium, formerly Fox Cities Stadium (1995-2007), and Time Warner Cable Field at Fox Cities Stadium (2007-2013), is a baseball park in Grand Chute, Wisconsin (although the address is for Appleton, Wisconsin). It is primarily used for baseball, and is the home field of the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers, a Midwest League team which functions as the Class A minor league baseball affiliate of the Milwaukee Brewers. The stadium also hosts a few music concerts each year. From 2000 until 2018, it hosted the NCAA Division III College World Series; the contract to host the event ran out in 2018 and the stadium chose to not renew the contract due to the expanded D-III playoffs schedule confilcting with the Timber Rattlers' schedule. The stadium was built in 1995, and now holds 5,900 people. It is also the host of the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association High School Spring Baseball Championship.

Packers Radio Network

The Packers Radio Network is a broadcast radio network and the official radio broadcaster of the Green Bay Packers football team. The network's flagship is the Good Karma Brands's WTMJ in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which has broadcast the games since November 24, 1929, and was the former flagship station of Journal Communications until the E. W. Scripps Company and Journal completed their broadcast merger and publishing spin-off on April 1, 2015 (Good Karma took over WTMJ's operations on November 1, 2018 upon Scripps' second withdrawal from radio). This is one of the few arrangements where a team's flagship radio station is not based in their home market and the local station serves as a network affiliate only, as WTMJ's signal to Green Bay and most of Wisconsin's population centers is city-grade; the rights for Packers games in the Green Bay area have bounced between Midwest Communications and Cumulus Media throughout the last few years, while stations carrying the games owned by Woodward Communications which nominally serve the Fox Cities exclusively have equally heavy listenership in Green Bay.

An internal Part 15 radio station featuring the Packers Radio Network play-by-play, along with public address and scoreboard announcements, serves the area surrounding Lambeau Field during Packers home games to provide the game call to those in attendance without the delay experienced by the uploading of the network feed via satellite. The feed is on a non-standard FM frequency which requires purchase of a special radio tuner from the team's pro shop to listen to that signal clearly, though it is audible with cross-channel interference from Wisconsin Public Radio's WPNE at 87.5 FM on regular tuners.

The Green Bay stations designated below in the table are considered additional "primary" stations in the network. This designation only truly comes to use in the later stages of the NFL Playoffs if the Packers make it to the NFC Championship Game and the Super Bowl, where those primary stations can carry the Packers Radio Network local call. All other network stations, including those licensed to communities in the Fox Cities, must carry the national Westwood One call instead in line with NFL rules.

In situations where Milwaukee Brewers baseball playoff games conflict with Packers games (WTMJ and Good Karma Brands also originate that team's broadcasts as the Brewers Radio Network) in September and October, WTMJ's FM sister station WKTI (94.5) originates the games in Milwaukee, with other stations in the Packers Radio Network making their own determinations about carriage of both games depending on whether they have a sister station to broadcast both games. WTMJ is simulcast on HD Radio over WKTI-HD2, in addition to the main AM signal's HD broadcast. Despite the NFL's Game Pass service nominally restricting WTMJ from streaming PRN coverage over the Internet, the station has streamed the team's games since the 2011 season, outside playoff games, though the streaming has been limited to desktop computers as of the 2015 NFL season due to both the new Game Pass package and TuneIn's premium service holding streaming rights for NFL play-by-play on mobile devices.

Its primary programming consists of broadcasts of Packer home and away games to a network of 56 stations in Wisconsin, the U.P., Iowa, North Dakota, and South Dakota, along with a two-hour pre-game show and three-hour postgame show which allows listeners to call, email, or text in a sports talk format about the finished game. Wayne Larrivee has been the play-by-play announcer since 1999, while former Packer center Larry McCarren has worked as the color commentator since 1995. Both Larrivee and McCarren contribute to the team's television programs, in addition to work with WTMJ's television sister station WTMJ-TV in Milwaukee and WGBA-TV in Green Bay, where McCarren was sports director from 2013 until 2015 when he began to focus exclusively on his Packers network duties.

Though its broadcasts began in 1929, WTMJ did not begin paying the Packers for broadcast rights until 1943; it paid the team $7500 to broadcast the season. In the early 1930s, there was no exclusive right given to broadcast games, and WHBY, then based in Green Bay, often sent its own announcers to call the game. From 1933 to 1936, three additional stations carried WTMJ's radio broadcasts of Packer games: WLBL in Stevens Point (a non-commercial station owned by the state commerce department decades before the creation of Wisconsin Public Radio), WTAQ in Green Bay and WKBH in La Crosse. WSAW in Wausau and WJMS in Ironwood, Michigan started carrying the feed in 1937.

Pat Gillick

Lawrence Patrick David Gillick (born August 22, 1937) is an American professional baseball executive. He previously served as the general manager of four MLB teams: the Toronto Blue Jays (1978–94), Baltimore Orioles (1996–98), Seattle Mariners (2000–03), and Philadelphia Phillies (2006–08). He guided the Blue Jays to World Series championships in 1992 and 1993, and later with the Phillies in 2008.

He won a national championship in college while pitching for the University of Southern California (USC).

Gillick was inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in 1997, the National Baseball Hall of Fame on July 24, 2011, the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in 2013, and the Phillies Wall of Fame in 2018.

Sparky Lyle

Albert Walter "Sparky" Lyle (born July 22, 1944) is an American former left-handed relief pitcher who spent sixteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1967 through 1982. He was a relief pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, Texas Rangers, Philadelphia Phillies, and Chicago White Sox.

A three-time All-Star, he won the American League (AL) Cy Young Award in 1977. He led the American League (AL) in saves in 1972 and 1976. With the Yankees, Lyle was a member of the World Series champions in 1977 and 1978, both over the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Lyle co-authored, with Peter Golenbock, The Bronx Zoo, a 1979 tell-all book which chronicled the dissension within the Yankees in its World Series Championship seasons of 1977 and 1978. From 1998–2012, Lyle served as manager of the Somerset Patriots, a minor league baseball team of the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball.

The Post-Crescent

The Post-Crescent is a daily newspaper based in Appleton, Wisconsin. Part of the Gannett chain of newspapers, it is primarily distributed in numerous counties surrounding the Appleton/Fox Cities area.

Wisconsin Timber Rattlers

The Wisconsin Timber Rattlers are a minor league baseball team of the Midwest League, and the Class A affiliate of the Milwaukee Brewers. The team is located in Appleton, and are named for the timber rattlesnake, which oddly enough is not indigenous to the area. The team plays its home games at Neuroscience Group Field at Fox Cities Stadium, which opened in 1995 and seats 5,170 fans (plus grass seating). The Timber Rattlers have won nine league championships, most recently in 2012. World Series-winning Managers Earl Weaver and Jack McKeon were Managers at Appleton. Baseball Hall of Fame members Pat Gillick, Earl Weaver, and Goose Gossage played for Appleton. Five future Cy Young Award winners and three Most Valuable Player recipients were on Appleton/Wisconsin rosters. The 1978 Appleton Foxes were recognized as one of the 100 greatest minor league teams of all time.

Zoilo Versalles

Zoilo Casanova Versalles Rodriguez (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈsoilo βeɾˈsaʝes]; December 18, 1939 – June 9, 1995), nicknamed "Zorro", was a Cuban professional baseball player. He played as a shortstop in Major League Baseball, most notably for the Minnesota Twins. He was the catalyst who led the 1965 Twins to their first World Series after moving from Washington to Minnesota. The same year he also won the American League Most Valuable Player award.

AppletonOshkoshNeenah / Fox Cities metropolitan area, Wisconsin
Core cities
Largest municipalities
over 10,000 in 2010
Municipalities
under 10,000 in 2010
Counties

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