Foreign born

Foreign-born (also non-native) people are those born outside of their country of residence. Foreign born are often non-citizens, but many are naturalized citizens of the country in which they live, and others are citizens by descent, typically through a parent.

The term foreign born encompasses both immigrants and expatriates but is not synonymous with either. Foreign born may, like immigrants, have committed to living in a country permanently or, like expatriates, live abroad for a significant period with the plan to return to their birth-country eventually.

The status of foreign born — particularly their access to citizenship — differs globally. The large groups of foreign-born guest workers in Arab states of the Persian Gulf, for example, have no right to citizenship no matter the length of their residence. In Canada, Australia and the United States, by contrast, foreign born are often citizens or in the process of becoming citizens. Certain countries have intermediary rules: in Germany and Japan it is often difficult but not impossible for the foreign born to become citizens.

Trends by country

The percentage of foreign born in a country is the product mostly of immigration rates, but is also affected by emigration rates and birth and death rates in the destination country. For example, the United Kingdom and Ireland are destination countries for migrants from Eastern Europe, Africa, and Asia, but are themselves source countries for immigration to other English-speaking countries. The countries with the highest rates of immigration are wealthy countries with relatively open nationality or migration laws, including the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, and the Persian Gulf states.

The largest foreign-born population in the world is in the United States, which was home to 39 million foreign-born residents in 2012, or 12.6% of the population.[1] The highest percentage of foreign-born residents occurs in small, wealthy countries with large numbers of temporary foreign workers, such as the United Arab Emirates and Qatar; the population of each is, depending on the economy at the time, around 80%.[2] In 2010, the Migration Policy Institute reported that the largest percentages were Qatar (86.5%) and UAE (70%).[3]

Cities with largest foreign born populations

Rank City Country Estimate Source Foreign-Born Population Percentage
1 London  United Kingdom ONS 2016 3,309,000[4] 37.8%
2 New York City  United States 2016 ACS 3,200,219[5] 37.5%
3 Sydney  Australia 2016 Census 1,961,977[6] 45.4%
4 Melbourne  Australia 2016 Census 1,784,794[7] 41.3%
5 Los Angeles  United States 2016 ACS 1,499,418 37.7%
6 Toronto  Canada Canada 2016 Census 1,266,005[8] 47.0%
7 Houston  United States 2016 ACS 698,395 30.3%
8 Brisbane  Australia 2016 Census 682,132[9] 33.2%
9 Chicago  United States 2016 ACS 559,623 20.7%
10 Montréal  Canada Canada 2016 Census 570,940 34.3%
11 San Jose  United States 2016 ACS 402,776 39.3%
12 Calgary  Canada Canada 2016 Census 383,065 31.3%
13 San Diego  United States 2016 ACS 373,842 26.7%
14 Paris  France 2014 UrbiStat 325,100[10] 14.6%
15 Dallas  United States 2016 ACS 324,972 24.7%
16 Milan  Italy Istat 2011 324,378[11] 10.7%
17 San Francisco  United States 2016 ACS 296,849 34.9%
18 Miami  United States 2016 ACS 264,656 58.3%
19 Vancouver  Canada Canada 2016 Census 262,765 42.5%
20 Ottawa  Canada Canada 2016 Census 216,505 23.6%
21 Boston  United States 2016 ACS 194,264 28.9%
22 Birmingham  United Kingdom ONS 2016 140,000 22.8%
23 Manchester  United Kingdom ONS 2016 140,000 26.4%

45.4Metropolitan and Urban regions with largest foreign born populations

  1. Data for the cities listed below is from numerous sources.
Rank[12] City Country Foreign-Born Population Sources of Immigrants
1 New York metropolitan area  United States 5,656,000[13]  China
 Dominican Republic
 Mexico
 India
 South Korea
 Jamaica
 Ecuador
 Colombia
 Guyana
 Italy
 Haiti
2 Los Angeles metropolitan area  United States 4,421,000[13]  Mexico
 Philippines
 El Salvador
 China
 Vietnam
 South Korea
 Guatemala
 Iran
 India
3 London and Home Counties  United Kingdom 4,051,502[4]  India
 Poland
 Bangladesh
 Romania
 Pakistan
 Italy
 Nigeria
 Ireland
 Sri Lanka
 France
4 Toronto metropolitan area  Canada 2,842,445[14]  China
 Philippines
 India
 Sri Lanka
 Italy
 United Kingdom
 European Union
 Pakistan
 Iran
 Jamaica
5 Hong Kong (SAR)  Hong Kong 2,793,450  China
 Indonesia
 Philippines
 Macau
 Thailand
6 San Francisco Bay Area  United States 2,634,270[15][16]  Mexico
 China
 Philippines
 Vietnam
 India
 El Salvador
 South Korea
 Iran
7 Paris metropolitan area  France 2,429,223[17]  Algeria
 Portugal
 Morocco
 Tunisia
 Guadeloupe
 Martinique
 Turkey
 China
 Italy
 Mali
8 Sydney Greater Capital City Statistical Area  Australia 2,071,872[18]  China
 United Kingdom
 India
 New Zealand
 Vietnam
 Philippines
 South Korea
 Lebanon
 Sri Lanka
9 Miami metropolitan area  United States 1,949,629  Cuba

 Haiti
 Colombia
 Jamaica
 Nicaragua
 Venezuela
 Mexico
 Peru
 Honduras
 Dominican Republic

10 Melbourne Greater Capital City Statistical Area  Australia 1,801,139 [19]  India
 China
 United Kingdom
 Vietnam
 New Zealand
 Italy
 Sri Lanka
 Greece
11 Chicago metropolitan area  United States 1,625,649  Mexico
 India
 Poland
 Philippines
 China
 South Korea
 Italy
 Guatemala
 Ukraine
12 Brussels Urban Area  Belgium 1,441,600  Italy
 France
 Morocco
 Turkey
 Romania
13 Berlin Urban Area  Germany 1,231,500  Turkey
 Russia
 Poland
 Syria
 Italy
 Bulgaria
 Romania
 Serbia
 France
 Vietnam
 United Kingdom
14 Singapore (city only)  Singapore 1,305,011  Malaysia
 China
 India
 Indonesia
 Philippines
 Bangladesh
 Taiwan
 Myanmar
 South Korea
15 Moscow (city only)  Russia 1,128,035  Ukraine
 Uzbekistan
 Tajikistan
 Azerbaijan

 Moldova
 Kazakhstan
 Kyrgyzstan
 Armenia
 Belarus

16 Houston metropolitan area  United States 1,113,875  Mexico
 El Salvador
 Vietnam
 India
 China
 Honduras
 Philippines
 Guatemala
 Colombia
17 Metropolitan Dubai  United Arab Emirates 1,056,000  India
 Pakistan
 Bangladesh
 Philippines
 Iran
 Sri Lanka
18 Riyadh (city only)  Saudi Arabia 1,054,000
19 Vancouver Urban Area  Canada 1,019,170  Hong Kong
 China
 India
 South Korea
 Taiwan
 Philippines
 Vietnam
 Japan
20 Washington metropolitan area  United States 1,017,432  El Salvador
 China
 Ethiopia
 Mexico
 India
 South Korea
 Philippines
 Vietnam
 Peru
 Bolivia
21 Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex  United States 1,016,221  Mexico

 India
 Vietnam
 El Salvador
 China
 South Korea
 Honduras
 Philippines

22 Frankfurt Urban Area  Germany 998,400  Turkey
 Italy
 Croatia
 Poland
 Romania
 Bulgaria
 Serbia
 Greece
 Russia
 Macedonia
23 Tokyo Urban Area  Japan 978,172  China
 South Korea
 Philippines
 Vietnam
 Brazil
   Nepal
 Taiwan
 Peru
 Thailand
24 Barcelona Urban Area  Spain 862,200  Italy
 Pakistan
 China
 Ecuador
 Bolivia
 Morocco
 France
25 Montreal Urban Area  Canada 740,400  Algeria
 Morocco
 Romania
 France
 Haiti
 Lebanon
26 Brisbane Greater Capital City Statistical Area  Australia 731,198  New Zealand
 England
 China
 India
 South Africa
 Philippines
 Vietnam
 South Korea
 Taiwan
 Scotland
 Malaysia
27 Auckland Urban Area  New Zealand 662,298  United Kingdom
 China
 India
 Fiji
 Samoa
 Philippines
 South Korea
 Sri Lanka
28 Muscat Urban Area  Oman 576,000  India
 Pakistan
 Bangladesh
 Sri Lanka
29 Milan Urban Area  Italy 475,000
30 Greater Manchester  United Kingdom 302,000  Pakistan
 China
 Ireland
 Bangladesh
 Poland
 Nigeria
 India
 Somalia
 Jamaica
 Iraq
31 Lyon Urban Area  France 241,000  Algeria
 Morocco
 European Union
 Tunisia
 Romania
32 Helsinki  Finland 213,290[20]  Russia
 Estonia
 Somalia
 Iraq
 Sweden
 China
 Yugoslavia
 Vietnam
 India
 Turkey
33 Geneva   Switzerland 77,602  Italy
 France
 Spain
 Germany
34 Luxembourg City  Luxembourg 70,783  France
 Portugal
 Italy
 Belgium
 Germany

See also

References

  1. ^ United States Census Bureau. Current Population Survey - March 2012 Detailed Tables, Table 1.1. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  2. ^ "UAE flatly rejects citizenship for foreign workers".
  3. ^ "Data Hub". migrationpolicy.org.
  4. ^ a b "Population of the United Kingdom by Country of Birth and Nationality".
  5. ^ "Place of Birth by Year of Entry by Citizenship Status for the Foreign-Born Population - Universe: Foreign-born population 2016 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates New York City". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  6. ^ "2016 Census QuickStats". Australian Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  7. ^ "2016 Census QuickStats". Australian Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  8. ^ "Census Profile, 2016 Census".
  9. ^ "2016 Census QuickStats". Australian Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  10. ^ "Province of PARIS". Urbistat. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  11. ^ [1]
  12. ^ "Data Hub". migrationpolicy.org.
  13. ^ a b Jie Zong and Jeanne Batalova (April 14, 2016). "U.S. Immigrant Population by Metropolitan Area". Migration Policy Institute. Retrieved April 23, 2016.
  14. ^ "Census Profile, 2016 Census - Toronto (Census metropolitan area), Ontario and Ontario (Province)".
  15. ^ Bureau, U.S. Census. "American FactFinder - Results". factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2017-12-06.
  16. ^ "U.S. Immigrant Population by State and County". migrationpolicy.org. 2014-02-04. Retrieved 2017-12-06.
  17. ^ INSEE. "Répartition de la population de la France par région de naissance et région de résidence en 2008". Retrieved 2012-01-29.
  18. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics. "2016 Census QuickStats - Greater Sydney". Retrieved 2017-06-09.
  19. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics. "2016 Census QuickStats - Greater Melbourne". Retrieved 2017-06-09.
  20. ^ http://pxnet2.stat.fi/PXWeb/pxweb/fi/StatFin/StatFin__vrm__vaerak/statfin_vaerak_pxt_032.px/?rxid=726cd24d-d0f1-416a-8eec-7ce9b82fd5a4

External links

Ariel Rechtshaid

Ariel Rechtshaid (born March 23, 1979) is an American record producer, audio engineer, mixing engineer, multi-instrumentalist, and songwriter. His production, songwriting, and mixing credits include HAIM, Vampire Weekend, Madonna, Usher, Adele, Brandon Flowers, Charli XCX, Kelela, Cass McCombs, Solange Knowles, Tobias Jesso Jr., Murs, Sky Ferreira, We Are Scientists, Kylie Minogue, U2, Glasser, Alex Clare, and Major Lazer. Rechtshaid co-wrote and produced Usher's 2012 single, "Climax", which won the 2013 Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance. Rechtshaid was nominated for the 2014 Grammy Award for Producer of the Year and won a Grammy for his production on the Vampire Weekend album Modern Vampires of the City. He also produced the Billboard Hot 100 No. 1-charting single "Hey There Delilah" by the Plain White T's in 2007. Rechtshaid is the former lead singer and guitarist of the ska/pop-punk band The Hippos and the bassist and producer of indie folk-rock group Foreign Born.

Demographics of Atlanta

Atlanta is the largest city in the state of Georgia. Atlanta ranks as the 38th-largest in the United States, and the sixth-largest city in the southeastern region. 2010 census results varied dramatically with previous Census Bureau estimates, counting 550,003 residents. Atlanta is the core city of the ninth most populous United States metropolitan area at 5,268,860 (est. 2010), with a combined statistical area of 5,626,400.

Educational attainment in the United States

The educational attainment of the U.S. population is similar to that of many other industrialized countries with the vast majority of the population having completed secondary education and a rising number of college graduates that outnumber high school dropouts. As a whole, the population of the United States is spending more years in formal educational programs. As with income, levels differ by race, age, household configuration and geography.Overall, the households and demographics featuring the highest educational attainment in the United States are also among those with the highest household income and wealth. Thus, while the population as a whole is proceeding further in formal educational programs, income and educational attainment remain highly correlated.

Egyptian Americans

Egyptian Americans are Americans of Egyptian ancestry. The 2016 US Census estimated the number of people with Egyptian ancestry at 256,000. Egyptian Americans may also include the Egyptian foreign-born population in the United States. The US Census Bureau estimated in 2016 that there were 181,677 foreign-born Egyptians in the United States. They represented around 0.4% of the total US foreign-born population as 42,194,354 first-generation immigrants in 2016.

Ethnic groups in Baltimore

There have been various ethnic groups in Baltimore, Maryland and its surrounding area since it was founded as a British colony in 1661. Native Americans lived in the Baltimore territory for millennia before European colonization, and some still reside in the city.

Since the first English settlers arrived, substantial immigration from all over Europe, migration of African-Americans from the Deep South, out-migration of White Southerners from Appalachia, and new waves of more recent immigrants from Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and Africa have added layers of complexity to the workforce and culture of Baltimore, as well as the religious and ethnic fabric of the city.

Expatriate

An expatriate (often shortened to expat) is a person temporarily or permanently residing in a country other than their native country. In common usage, the term often refers to professionals, skilled workers, or artists taking positions outside their home country, either independently or sent abroad by their employers, who can be companies, universities, governments, or non-governmental organisations. Effectively migrant workers, they usually earn more than they would at home, and more than local employees. However, the term 'expatriate' is also used for retirees and others who have chosen to live outside their native country. Historically, it has also referred to exiles.

Foreign-born Japanese

A foreign-born Japanese (外国生まれの日本人, gaikoku umare no nihonjin, literally "Japanese person born in a foreign country") is a Japanese person of foreign descent or heritage, who was born outside Japan and later acquired Japanese citizenship. This category encompasses persons of both Japanese and non-Japanese descent. The former subcategory is considered because of intricacies of national and international laws regarding the citizenship of newborn persons.

Foreign-born population of the United Kingdom

The foreign-born population of the United Kingdom includes immigrants from a wide range of countries who are resident in the United Kingdom. In the period January to December 2016, there were groups from 22 foreign countries that were estimated to consist of at least 100,000 individuals residing in the UK (people born in Poland, India, Pakistan, the Republic of Ireland, Romania, Germany, Bangladesh, South Africa, China, Italy, Nigeria, Lithuania, the United States, France, Spain, the Philippines, Jamaica, Sri Lanka, Australia, Portugal, Kenya and Zimbabwe).

History of immigration to the United States

The history of immigration to the United States details the movement of people to the United States starting with the first European settlements from around 1600. Beginning around this time, British and other Europeans settled primarily on the east coast. In 1619, Africans began being imported as slaves. The United States experienced successive waves of immigration, particularly from Europe. Immigrants sometimes paid the cost of transoceanic transportation by becoming indentured servants after their arrival in the New World. Later, immigration rules became more restrictive; the ending of numerical restrictions occurred in 1965. Recently, cheap air travel has increased immigration from Asia and Latin America.

Attitudes towards new immigrants have cycled between favorable and hostile since the 1790s.

Immigrant generations

The term "first-immigrant" refers to the very first immigrants or to the children of such an immigrant. The term second-generation consequently may refer to either the children or the grandchildren of such an immigrant. The terms are used interchangeably because of the ambiguity between them.

According to the Merriam-Webster's Dictionary a "First-generation" is

"born in the U.S. -used of an American of immigrant parentage"

"foreign-born -used of a naturalized citizen"

Immigration to Italy

As of 1 January 2017, there were 5,047,028 foreign nationals resident in Italy. This amounted to 8.2% of the country's population and represented an increase of 92,352 over the previous year. These figures include children born in Italy to foreign nationals (who were 75,067 in 2014; 14.9% of total births in Italy), but exclude foreign nationals who have subsequently acquired Italian nationality; this applied to 129,887 people in 2014. Around 6,200,000 people residing in Italy have an immigration background (around the 10% of the total Italian population). They also exclude illegal immigrants whose numbers are difficult to determine. In May 2008, The Boston Globe quoted an estimate of 670,000 for this group. The distribution of foreign born population is largely uneven in Italy: 59.5% of immigrants live in the northern part of the country (the most economically developed area), 25.4% in the central one, while only 15.1% live in the southern regions. The children born in Italy to foreign mothers were 102,000 in 2012, 99,000 in 2013 and 97,000 in 2014.Since the expansion of the European Union, the most recent wave of migration has been from surrounding European states, particularly Eastern Europe, and increasingly Asia, replacing North Africa as the major immigration area. About a million Romanians, around 10% of them being Roma, are officially registered as living in Italy. As of 2013, the foreign born population origin was subdivided as follows: Europe (50.8%), Africa (22.1%), Asia (18.8%), America (8.3%), and Oceania (0.1%).

Immigration to Norway

In 2017, Norway's immigrant population consisted of 883,751 people, making up 16.8% of the country's total population. This includes both foreign-born and Norwegian-born with two foreign-born parents, and four foreign-born grandparents. In this population, 724,987 are foreign-born immigrants, while 158,764 are norwegian-born with foreign-born parents. The ten most common countries of origin of immigrants residing in Norway are Poland (97,196), Lithuania (37,638), Sweden (36,315), Somalia (28,696), Germany (24,601), Iraq & Kurdistan region (22,493), Syria (20,823), Philippines (20,537), Iran & Kordestan province (21,364) Pakistan (19,973). The immigration population comprises people from a total of 221 countries and autonomous regions.Immigration to Norway has increased over the last decades, beginning in the early 1990s. In 1992, the immigrant population in Norway was 183,000 individuals, representing 4.3% of the total population, and the net migration consisted of 9,105 people. In 2012, net migration peaked, as 48,714 people came to the country. Starting in 2013, net migration has decreased. In 2016, net migration was 27,778. Immigrants from specific countries are divided into several ethnic groups. For example, there are both Turks and Kurds from Turkey, West Punjabis and East Punjabis from Pakistan and India respectively, Macedonians and Albanians from Macedonia, Sinhalese and Tamils from Sri Lanka, Arabs and Berbers from Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia. Jews and Palestinans from Israel, Pakistanis and Pathans/Baluchs from Pakistan and immigrants from Iran are divided into Mazandaranians, Azeris, Persians, Kurds and Lurs.

Immigration to the United States

Immigration to the United States is the international movement of non-U.S. nationals in order to reside permanently in the country. Lawful immigration has been a major source of population growth and cultural change throughout much of the U.S. history. Because the United States is a settler colonial society, all Americans, with the exception of the small percent of Native Americans, can trace their ancestry to immigrants from other nations around the world.

In absolute numbers, the United States has a larger immigrant population than any other country, with 47 million immigrants as of 2015. This represents 19.1% of the 244 million international migrants worldwide, and 14.4% of the U.S. population. Some other countries have larger proportions of immigrants, such as Switzerland with 24.9% and Canada with 21.9%.According to the 2016 Yearbook of Immigration Statistics, the United States admitted 1.18 million legal immigrants in 2016. Of these, 20% were family-sponsored, 47% were the immediate relatives of U.S. citizens, 12% were employment-based preferences, 4% were part of the Diversity Immigrant Visa program, and 13% were refugees and/or asylum seekers. The remainder included small numbers from several other categories, including those who were granted the Special Immigrant Visa (SIV); persons admitted under the Nicaraguan and Central American Relief Act; children born subsequent to the issuance of a parent's visa; and certain parolees from the former Soviet Union, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam who were denied refugee status.The economic, social, and political aspects of immigration have caused controversy regarding such issues as maintaining ethnic homogeneity, workers for employers versus jobs for non-immigrants, settlement patterns, impact on upward social mobility, crime, and voting behavior.

Prior to 1965, policies such as the national origins formula limited immigration and naturalization opportunities for people from areas outside Western Europe. Exclusion laws enacted as early as the 1880s generally prohibited or severely restricted immigration from Asia, and quota laws enacted in the 1920s curtailed Eastern European immigration. The civil rights movement led to the replacement of these ethnic quotas with per-country limits. Since then, the number of first-generation immigrants living in the United States has quadrupled.Research suggests that immigration to the United States is beneficial to the U.S. economy. With few exceptions, the evidence suggests that on average, immigration has positive economic effects on the native population, but it is mixed as to whether low-skilled immigration adversely affects low-skilled natives. Studies also show that immigrants have lower crime rates than natives in the United States. Research shows that the United States excels at assimilating first- and second-generation immigrants relative to many other Western countries.

Japanese

Japanese may refer to:

Something from or related to Japan, an island country in East Asia

Japanese language, spoken mainly in Japan

Japanese people, the ethnic group that identifies with Japan through culture or ancestry

Japanese diaspora, Japanese emigrants and their descendants around the world

Foreign-born Japanese, naturalized citizens of Japan

Japanese writing system, consisting of kanji and kana

Japanese cuisine, the food and food culture of Japan

List of sovereign states and dependent territories by immigrant population

These are lists of countries by foreign-born population (immigrants) and lists of countries by number native-born persons living in a foreign country (emigrants).

According to estimates from the UN 2015 report, in 2013, the United States, Germany and Russia had the largest number of immigrants of any country, while Tuvalu and Tokelau had the lowest. In terms of percentage of population the Vatican City and the United Arab Emirates had the highest, while North Korea had the lowest.

According to estimates from the same UN 2015 report, in 2013, India and Mexico had the highest numbers of native-born persons living in a foreign country, while Tokelau and San Marino had the lowest.

Louisa Adams

Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams (February 12, 1775 – May 15, 1852), wife of John Quincy Adams, was the First Lady of the United States from 1825 to 1829. Born in London, she was the first First Lady to be born outside the United States, or the preceding Thirteen Colonies — a distinction that would not be shared until 192 years later by Melania Trump.

Overseas Chinese

Overseas Chinese (traditional Chinese: 海外華人/海外中國人; simplified Chinese: 海外华人/海外中国人; pinyin: Hǎiwài Huárén) are people of ethnic Chinese birth or descent who reside outside the territories of Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. Although a vast majority are Han Chinese, the group represents virtually all ethnic groups in China.

Rikishi

A rikishi (力士) sumotori or, more colloquially, sumosan, is a professional sumo wrestler. Rikishi are expected to live according to centuries-old rules and, although there are some exceptions, most come from Japan, where sumo is practiced exclusively. Participation in official tournaments is the only means of marking achievement in sumo and the rank of an individual rikishi is based solely on official wins.

Union Army

During the American Civil War, the Union Army referred to the United States Army, the land force that fought to preserve the Union of the collective states. Also known as the Federal Army, it proved essential to the preservation of the United States of America as a working, viable republic.

The Union Army was made up of the permanent regular army of the United States, but further fortified, augmented, and strengthened by the many temporary units of dedicated volunteers as well as including those who were drafted in to service as conscripts. To this end, the Union Army fought and ultimately triumphed over the efforts of the Confederate States Army in the American Civil War.

Over the course of the war, 2,128,948 men enlisted in the Union Army, including 178,895 colored troops; 25% of the white men who served were foreign-born. Of these soldiers, 596,670 were killed, wounded or went missing. The initial call-up was for just three months, after which many of these men chose to reenlist for an additional three years.

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