Forces Command (Australia)

Forces Command (FORCOMD) is the largest command within the Australian Army responsible for the combat brigades, the enabling and training formations reporting to the Chief of the Army with approximately 85% of the Army’s personnel.[1][2][3] The Command was formed on 1 July 2009 with the amalgamation of Land Command and Training Command,[4] and is led by a major general as the Commander Forces Command (COMD FORCOMD).

Forces Command
Active1 July 2009 – present
CountryAustralia
TypeAustralian Army
Part ofChief of Army
Garrison/HQVictoria Barracks, Sydney
Commanders
Current
commander
Major General Chris Field
Chief of the ArmyLieutenant General Rick Burr

History

On 27 September 2008 the Chief of Army, Lieutenant General Ken Gillespie, announced a restructure of the army command structure named Adaptive Army.[5] The structure had remained nearly the same since the Hassett Review restructure in 1973 of Land Command and Training Command.[6]

Structure

Commander Forces Command

The following have held the position of Commander Forces Command or its preceding positions, with the ranks and honours as at the completion of their tenure:

Rank Name Post-nominals Term began Term ended
Field Force Command
Major General Kenneth Mackay CB, MBE 1973 1974[21]
Major General Donald Dunstan CB, CBE 1974 1977
Major General Mark Bradbury AO, CBE 1977 1979
Major General John Williamson AO, OBE 1979 1980
Major General Ron Grey AO, DSO 1980 1983
Major General John Kelly AO, DSO 1983 1984
Major General Lawrence O'Donnell AO 1985 1986
Land Commander Australia
Major General Lawrence O'Donnell AO 1986 1987
Major General Neville Smethurst AO, MBE 1987 1990
Major General Murray Blake AO, MC 1990 1994
Major General Peter Arnison AO 1994 1996
Major General Frank Hickling AO, CSC 1996 1998
Major General John Hartley AO 1998 2000
Major General Peter Abigail AO 2000 December 2002
Major General David Hurley AO, DSC December 2002 December 2003
Major General Ken Gillespie AO, DSC, CSM January 2004 July 2005
Major General Mark Kelly AO July 2005 December 2008
Major General David Morrison AM December 2008 July 2009
Commander Forces Command
Major General David Morrison AO July 2009 June 2011
Major General Jeffrey Sengelman DSC, AM, CSC June 2011 November 2011
Major General Michael Slater AO, DSC, CSC November 2011 23 January 2015
Major General Gus Gilmore AO, DSC 23 January 2015 December 2016
Major General Gus McLachlan AO December 2016 December 2018
Major General Greg Bilton AM, CSC December 2018 June 2019
Major General Chris Field AM, CSC June 2019

References

  1. ^ "The Australian Army – Modernisation from Beersheba and Beyond" (PDF). Australian Army. 26 August 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 July 2016. Retrieved 1 August 2016.
  2. ^ "Forces Command". Australian Army. 1 May 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  3. ^ "The Australian Army: An Aide-Memoire" (PDF). Australian Army. 2014. Retrieved 27 December 2016.
  4. ^ "May the force be with you – Merge of commands enhances capabilities" (PDF). Army: The Soldiers' Newspaper (1216 ed.). Canberra: Department of Defence. 9 July 2009. p. 2. ISSN 0729-5685. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  5. ^ "Command restructure" (PDF). Army: The Soldiers' Newspaper (1197 ed.). Canberra: Department of Defence. 4 September 2008. ISSN 0729-5685. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  6. ^ Gillespie, Lieutenant General K.J (26 August 2008). Adaptive Army: Public information paper (PDF). Canberra: Australian Army. OCLC 682906519. Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 March 2011.
  7. ^ "1st Brigade". Australian Army. 3 June 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  8. ^ "3rd Brigade". Australian Army. 3 June 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  9. ^ "6th Combat Support Brigade". Australian Army. 23 February 2016. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  10. ^ "7th Brigade". Australian Army. 3 June 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  11. ^ "16th Aviation Brigade". Australian Army. 9 March 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  12. ^ "17th Combat Service Support Brigade". Australian Army. 5 July 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  13. ^ "Royal Military College of Australia". Australian Army. 18 April 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  14. ^ "2nd Division". Australian Army. 21 April 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  15. ^ "4th Brigade". Australian Army. 4 December 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  16. ^ "5th Brigade". Australian Army. 7 March 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  17. ^ "8th Brigade". Australian Army. 21 March 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  18. ^ "9th Brigade". Australian Army. 17 February 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  19. ^ "11th Brigade". Australian Army. 8 March 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  20. ^ "13th Brigade". Australian Army. 21 March 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  21. ^ Gillespie, Ken (2004). "Major General Kenneth Mackay, CB, MBE (1917–2004)". Australian Army Journal. 2 (1): 247–249.
2nd Combat Engineer Regiment (Australia)

The 2nd Combat Engineer Regiment (2 CER) is an Australian Army combat engineer regiment located at Gallipoli Barracks in Brisbane, Queensland. It is part of the Australian 7th Brigade, attached to Forces Command (Australia).

2 CER's lineage is formally traced to 4th Field Company (4 Fd Coy) Royal Australian Engineers, which was raised in the early stages of World War I. Renamed 7th Field Company (7 Fd Coy) in 1915, the unit was renowned for its service in France and Belgium at the Battle of the Somme, Menin Road and on the Hindenburg Line. During World War II, 7 Fd Coy fought the Japanese at Kokoda and on Bougainville.

Forces Command

Forces Command is a military formation in use in at least two different armies:

Forces Command (Australia)

United States Army Forces Command

Oxford Street, Sydney

Oxford Street is a major thoroughfare in Sydney, Australia, running from Whitlam Square on the south-east corner of Hyde Park in the central business district (CBD) of Sydney to Bondi Junction in the Eastern Suburbs. Close to the CBD in particular, the street is lined with numerous shops, bars and nightclubs. In recent years, Oxford Street has garnered a reputation as Sydney's primary nightclub strip, and has subsequently seen a large increase in the number of crimes committed in the area.

The western section, which runs through the suburb of Darlinghurst, is widely recognised as Sydney's main gay district and Oxford Street is closed to traffic once a year in early March for the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras. Specifically, the area of Oxford Street between Hyde Park and Paddington Town Hall became known from the early 1980's as 'The Golden Mile' because of the growing density of popular venues for the gay community. The section to the east of Taylor Square, running through the suburb of Paddington forms an upmarket shopping strip and represents the home of the new medical faculty of the University of Notre Dame Australia as well as the University of New South Wales' College of Fine Arts, Victoria Barracks, Paddington Bazaar and St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney amongst other locations.

Australian Defence Organisation
Australian Defence Force
Royal Australian Navy
Australian Army
Royal Australian Air Force
Department of Defence

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