Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament

The women's football tournament at the 2012 Summer Olympics was held in London and five other cities in the United Kingdom from 25 July to 9 August. Associations affiliated with FIFA were invited to enter their women's teams in regional qualifying competitions, from which 11 teams, plus the hosts Great Britain reached the final tournament. There are no age restrictions for the players participating in the tournament. It is the first major FIFA affiliated women's tournament to be staged within the United Kingdom, and marked the first time a team representing Great Britain took part in the women's tournament.

2012 Women's Olympic Football Tournament
Olympic rings without rims
Tournament details
Host countryUnited Kingdom
Dates25 July – 9 August 2012
(15 days)
Teams12 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s)6 (in 6 host cities)
Final positions
Champions United States (4th title)
Runners-up Japan
Third place Canada
Fourth place France
Tournament statistics
Matches played26
Goals scored70 (2.69 per match)
Attendance661,016 (25,424 per match)
Top scorer(s)Canada Christine Sinclair
(6 goals)

Qualifying

Each National Olympic Committee may enter one women's team in the football tournament.

Means of qualification Date of completion Venue1 Berths Qualified
Host nation 2005 none 1  Great Britain
AFC Preliminary Competition 11 September 2011  China[1] 2  Japan
 North Korea
CAF Preliminary Competition 22 October 2011[2] multiple 2  South Africa
 Cameroon
CONCACAF Preliminary Competition 29 January 2012  Canada[3] 2  United States
 Canada
CONMEBOL Preliminary Competition 21 November 2010  Ecuador 2  Brazil
 Colombia
OFC Preliminary Competition 4 April 2012 multiple 1  New Zealand
Best UEFA teams in 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup 17 July 2011  Germany 2  Sweden
 France
TOTAL 12
  • ^1 Locations are those of final tournaments, various qualification stages may precede matches at these specific venues.

Draw

The draw for the tournament took place on 24 April 2012.[4] Great Britain, Japan and the United States were seeded for the draw and placed into groups E–G, respectively.[5] The remaining teams were drawn from four pots.[6]

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4

Squads

The women's tournament is a full international tournament with no restrictions on age. Each nation must submit a squad of 18 players.

Match officials

On 19 April 2012, FIFA released the list of match referees that would officiate at the Olympics.[7]

Confederation Referee Assistants
AFC South Korea Hong Eun-Ah Australia Sarah Ho
South Korea Kim Kyoung-Min
Japan Sachiko Yamagishi Japan Saori Takahashi
Malaysia Widiya Habibah Shamsuri
CAF Cameroon Thérèse Neguel Benin Tempa Ndah
Madagascar Lidwine Rakotozafinoro
CONCACAF Canada Carol Anne Chenard Canada Marie-Josée Charbonneau
Jamaica Stacy Greyson
Mexico Quetzalli Alvarado Honduras Shirley Perello
Mexico Mayte Chávez
United States Kari Seitz United States Marlene Duffy
United States Veronica Perez
CONMEBOL Argentina Salomé di Iorio Argentina María Rocco
Uruguay Mariana Corbo
Confederation Referee Assistants
UEFA Finland Kirsi Heikkinen Finland Anu Jokela
Finland Tonja Paavola
Germany Bibiana Steinhaus Germany Katrin Rafalski
Germany Marina Wozniak
Greece Efthalia Mitsi Spain Yolanda Parga
Spain María Villa
Norway Christina Pedersen Croatia Lada Rojc
Norway Hege Steinlund
Sweden Jenny Palmqvist Sweden Helen Karo
Sweden Anna Nyström

Preliminary round

Group winners and runners-up and the two best third-ranked teams advanced to the quarter-finals (also see Tie breakers).

All times are British Summer Time (UTC+1).

Group E

Millennium Stadium GBR-NZL
Great Britain vs New Zealand
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Great Britain 3 3 0 0 5 0 +5 9 Qualified for the quarter-finals
2  Brazil 3 2 0 1 6 1 +5 6
3  New Zealand 3 1 0 2 3 3 0 3
4  Cameroon 3 0 0 3 1 11 −10 0
Great Britain 1–0 New Zealand
Houghton Goal 64' Report
Cameroon 0–5 Brazil
Report Francielle Goal 7'
Costa Goal 10'
Marta Goal 73' (pen.)88'
Cristiane Goal 78'
New Zealand 0–1 Brazil
Report Cristiane Goal 86'
Great Britain 3–0 Cameroon
Stoney Goal 18'
J. Scott Goal 23'
Houghton Goal 82'
Report
New Zealand 3–1 Cameroon
Smith Goal 43'
Sonkeng Goal 49' (o.g.)
Gregorius Goal 62'
Report Onguene Goal 75'
Great Britain 1–0 Brazil
Houghton Goal 2' Report

Group F

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Sweden 3 1 2 0 6 3 +3 5 Qualified for the quarter-finals
2  Japan 3 1 2 0 2 1 +1 5
3  Canada 3 1 1 1 6 4 +2 4
4  South Africa 3 0 1 2 1 7 −6 1
Japan 2–1 Canada
Kawasumi Goal 33'
Miyama Goal 44'
Report Tancredi Goal 55'
Sweden 4–1 South Africa
Fischer Goal 7'
Dahlkvist Goal 20'
Schelin Goal 21'63'
Report Modise Goal 60'
Japan 0–0 Sweden
Report
Canada 3–0 South Africa
Tancredi Goal 7'
Sinclair Goal 58'86'
Report
Japan 0–0 South Africa
Report
Canada 2–2 Sweden
Tancredi Goal 43'84' Report Hammarström Goal 14'
Jakobsson Goal 16'

Group G

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  United States 3 3 0 0 8 2 +6 9 Qualified for the quarter-finals
2  France 3 2 0 1 8 4 +4 6
3  North Korea 3 1 0 2 2 6 −4 3
4  Colombia 3 0 0 3 0 6 −6 0
United States 4–2 France
Wambach Goal 19'
Morgan Goal 32'66'
Lloyd Goal 56'
Report Thiney Goal 12'
Delie Goal 14'
Colombia 0–2 North Korea
Report Kim Song-hui Goal 39'85'
United States 3–0 Colombia
Rapinoe Goal 33'
Wambach Goal 74'
Lloyd Goal 77'
Report
France 5–0 North Korea
Georges Goal 45'
Thomis Goal 70'
Delie Goal 71'
Renard Goal 81'
Catala Goal 87'
Report
United States 1–0 North Korea
Wambach Goal 25' Report
France 1–0 Colombia
Thomis Goal 5' Report

† Game delayed by one hour due to North Korean protest after accidental use of South Korean flag for North Korea.[26]

Ranking of third-placed teams

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Canada 3 1 1 1 6 4 +2 4
 New Zealand 3 1 0 2 3 3 0 3
 North Korea 3 1 0 2 2 6 −4 3
Green indicates qualified for the quarter-finals

Knockout stage

  Quarter-finals Semi-finals Gold medal match
                           
  E1  Great Britain 0  
F3  Canada 2  
  F3  Canada 3  
  G1  United States (aet) 4  
G1  United States 2
  E3  New Zealand 0  
    G1  United States 2
  F2  Japan 1
  F1  Sweden 1  
G2  France 2  
  G2  France 1 Bronze medal match
  F2  Japan 2  
E2  Brazil 0 F3  Canada 1
  F2  Japan 2   G2  France 0

Quarter-finals

Sweden 1–2 France
Fischer Goal 18' Report Georges Goal 29'
Renard Goal 39'
United States 2–0 New Zealand
Wambach Goal 27'
Leroux Goal 87'
Report
Brazil 0–2 Japan
Report Ōgimi Goal 27'
Ohno Goal 73'
Great Britain 0–2 Canada
Report Filigno Goal 12'
Sinclair Goal 26'

Semi-finals

France 1–2 Japan
Le Sommer Goal 76' Report Ōgimi Goal 32'
Sakaguchi Goal 49'
Canada 3–4 (a.e.t.) United States
Sinclair Goal 22'67'73' Report Rapinoe Goal 54' (cnr.)70'
Wambach Goal 80' (pen.)
Morgan Goal 120+3'

Bronze medal match

3rd, bronze medalist(s) Canada 1–0 France
Matheson Goal 90+2' Report

Gold medal match

1st, gold medalist(s) United States 2–1 Japan 2nd, silver medalist(s)
Lloyd Goal 8'54' Report Ōgimi Goal 63'

Final ranking

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  United States (USA) 6 6 0 0 16 6 +10 18
2  Japan (JPN) 6 3 2 1 7 4 +3 11
3  Canada (CAN) 6 3 1 2 12 8 +4 10
4  France (FRA) 6 3 0 3 11 8 +3 9
5  Great Britain (GBR) 4 3 0 1 5 2 +3 9
6  Brazil (BRA) 4 2 0 2 6 3 +3 6
7  Sweden (SWE) 4 1 2 1 7 5 +2 5
8  New Zealand (NZL) 4 1 0 3 3 5 −2 3
9  North Korea (PRK) 3 1 0 2 2 6 −4 3
10  South Africa (RSA) 3 0 1 2 1 7 −6 1
11  Colombia (COL) 3 0 0 3 0 6 −6 0
12  Cameroon (CMR) 3 0 0 3 1 11 −10 0

Statistics

Goalscorers

6 goals
5 goals
4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
Own goals

Discipline

Red cards
Match bans
  • Colombia Lady Andrade was banned two matches for violent conduct in punching Abby Wambach.[35]

Notable events and controversies

North Korea – South Korea flag confusion

In the first day of the Olympic events on 25 July, the match between DPR Korea and Colombia was delayed by a little over an hour because the flag of South Korea was mistakenly displayed on the electronic scoreboard in Hampden Park. The North Korean team walked off the pitch in protest at seeing the South Korean flag displayed by their names and refused to warm-up whilst the flag was being displayed. They also objected to the South Korean flag being displayed above the stadium, even though the flags of all the competing countries were being displayed. The game then commenced after a delay and rectification of the error.[36]

Andy Mitchell, venue media manager for the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG), read out a LOCOG statement shortly afterwards:[37][38]

"Today ahead of the Women’s football match at Hampden Park, the South Korean flag was shown on a big screen video package instead of the North Korean flag. Clearly that is a mistake, we will apologise to the team and the National Olympic Committee and steps will be taken to ensure this does not happen again".

LOCOG's statement had to be reissued because it failed to use the nations' official titles, "Republic of Korea" and "Democratic People's Republic of Korea".[39]

British Prime Minister David Cameron added that it was an "honest mistake" and efforts would be undertaken to ensure such a mishap does not recur. However, North Korean manager Sin Ui-gun expressed reservations about whether the incident was a mistake of intention and said: "We were angry because our players were introduced as if they were from South Korea, which may affect us greatly as you may know. Our team was not going to participate unless the problem was solved perfectly and fortunately some time later, the broadcasting was corrected and shown again live so we made up our mind to participate and go on with the match. If this matter cannot be solved, we thought going on was nonsense. Winning the game cannot compensate for that thing".[40]

Canada–United States semi-final

During the semi-final match between Canada and the United States, a time-wasting call was made against the Canadian goalkeeper, Erin McLeod, when she held the ball longer than the allowed six seconds. This violation is called in international play, and is intended to be used during instances of time-wasting.[41] As a result, the American side was awarded a indirect free-kick in the box. On the ensuing play, Canada was penalized for a handball in the penalty box, with the American team being awarded a penalty kick, which Abby Wambach converted to tie the game at 3–3. The Americans went on to win the match in extra time, advancing to the gold medal game.[42][43] After the match, Canada forward Christine Sinclair stated, "the ref decided the result before the game started." FIFA responded by stating that the refeering decisions were correct and saying it was considering disciplinary action against Sinclair, but that any disciplinary action would be postponed until after the end of the tournament.[44][45][46]

See also

References

  1. ^ "China to host women's Olympic qualifiers". Asian Football Confederation. 3 March 2011. Retrieved 25 July 2012.
  2. ^ "Fixture change in Africa". FIFA. 19 August 2011. Retrieved 25 July 2012.
  3. ^ "Canada granted 2012 Olympic Qualifiers". CanadaSoccer.com. Canadian Soccer Association. Archived from the original on 2011-11-11. Retrieved 2011-12-07.
  4. ^ "Here we go: Team GB fixture dates confirmed and London 2012 Football tickets to go back on sale". London 2012. 10 November 2011. Retrieved 25 July 2012.
  5. ^ Collett, Mike (23 April 2012). "Britain, Brazil, Spain seeded". Reuters. Retrieved 25 July 2012.
  6. ^ Kelso, Paul (23 April 2012). "London 2012 Olympics: Team GB men's side avoid Brazil and Spain in group stage of football tournament". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 25 July 2012.
  7. ^ "Olympic Football Tournament London 2012 – Appointments of Match Officials" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 19 April 2012. Retrieved 19 April 2012.
  8. ^ "Great Britain – New Zealand". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 25 July 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  9. ^ "Cameroon – Brazil". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 25 July 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  10. ^ "New Zealand – Brazil". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 28 July 2012. Retrieved 28 July 2012.
  11. ^ "Great Britain – Cameroon". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 28 July 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2012.
  12. ^ "New Zealand – Cameroon". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 31 July 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2012.
  13. ^ "Great Britain – Brazil". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 31 July 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2012.
  14. ^ "Japan – Canada". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 25 July 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  15. ^ "Sweden – South Africa". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 25 July 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  16. ^ "Japan – Sweden". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 28 July 2012. Retrieved 28 July 2012.
  17. ^ "Canada – South Africa". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 28 July 2012. Retrieved 28 July 2012.
  18. ^ "Japan – South Africa". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 31 July 2012. Retrieved 31 July 2012.
  19. ^ "Canada – Sweden". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 31 July 2012. Retrieved 31 July 2012.
  20. ^ "United States – France". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 25 July 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  21. ^ "Colombia – North Korea". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 25 July 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  22. ^ "United States – Colombia". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 28 July 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2012.
  23. ^ "France – North Korea". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 28 July 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2012.
  24. ^ "United States – North Korea". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 31 July 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2012.
  25. ^ "France – Colombia". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 31 July 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2012.
  26. ^ Borden, Same (25 July 2012). "Flag Error Delays Start of North Korea-Colombia Match". New York Times. New York Times. Retrieved 25 July 2012.
  27. ^ "Sweden – France". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 3 August 2012. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  28. ^ "United States – New Zealand". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 3 August 2012. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  29. ^ "Brazil – Japan". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 3 August 2012. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  30. ^ "Great Britain – Canada". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 3 August 2012. Retrieved 3 August 2012.
  31. ^ "France – Japan". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 6 August 2012. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  32. ^ "Canada – United States". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 6 August 2012. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  33. ^ "Canada – France". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 9 August 2012. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  34. ^ "United States – Japan". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 9 August 2012. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  35. ^ "Lady Andrade banned two games". ESPN. 30 July 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2012.
  36. ^ Stuart, Gavin (25 July 2012). "Hampden Olympic blunder sees North Korea delay game after wrong flag raised". stv.tv. Archived from the original on 27 July 2012. Retrieved 25 July 2012.
  37. ^ "London 2012 'sorry' over North Korea flag mix-up". Channel 4 News. Retrieved 26 July 2012.
  38. ^ Bowater, Donna (25 July 2012). "North Korea women footballers protest over flag gaffe". The Daily Telegraph. London. Retrieved 25 July 2012.
  39. ^ "Olympics in flap over North Korean flag fiasco". Japan Times. Associated Press. 27 July 2012. p. 4.
  40. ^ "Olympics: Apology to N Korea over flag mix-up". Al Jazeera English. 27 July 2012. Retrieved 27 July 2012.
  41. ^ http://thechronicleherald.ca/olympics2012/124836-controversial-women-s-soccer-call-continues-to-baffle-experts
  42. ^ "Controversy mars Americans' 4–3 win over Canada, but shouldn't detract from a great game". Yahoo! Sports. 7 August 2012. Retrieved 7 August 2012.
  43. ^ "London 2012 soccer: Controversial call against Canada in U.S. semifinal rarely made". Toronto Star. 7 August 2012.
  44. ^ "FIFA to probe Canadian remarks". Japan Times. Associated Press. 9 August 2012. p. 17.
  45. ^ "Christine Sinclair's suspension wasn't for comments to media". CBC News.
  46. ^ Kelly, Cathal (2015-06-12). "The greatest game of women's soccer ever played". The Globe and Mail.

External links

2012 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament

The 2012 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament was an association football competition used to determine the two participants who would compete at the 2012 Summer Olympics. It was held at BC Place in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, from January 19–29, 2012.

Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's tournament

The men's football tournament at the 2012 Summer Olympics was held in London and five other cities in Great Britain from 26 July to 11 August. Associations affiliated with FIFA were invited to enter their men's U-23 teams in regional qualifying competitions, from which 15 teams, plus the hosts Great Britain, reached the final tournament. Men's teams were allowed to augment their squads with three players over the age of 23. It was the first major FIFA-organised men's tournament to be held within the United Kingdom since the 1966 FIFA World Cup and was the first men's Olympic football tournament to feature a team representing Great Britain since the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome.The gold medal was won by Mexico who defeated Brazil 2–1 in the final.

Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's Asian Qualifiers

The Asian Football Confederation's Pre-Olympic Tournament. Eighteen teams entered the qualification for the two allocated spots for the 2012 Summer Olympics Football tournament in London, however, Qatar withdrew before playing any match. The competition was originally scheduled for February 2010 but it eventually started in March 2011.

Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's team squads

The following is a list of squads for each nation competing in women's football at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Each nation must submit a squad of 18 players. A minimum of two goalkeepers (plus one optional dispensation goalkeeper) must be included in the squad.

Women's association football

Women's association football, usually known as women's football or women's soccer, is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.The history of women's football has seen major competitions being launched at both the national and international levels. Women's football has faced many struggles throughout its history. Although its first golden age occurred in the United Kingdom in the early 1920s, with matches attracting large crowds (one match achieved over 50,000 spectators), The Football Association initiated a ban in 1921 that disallowed women's football games from taking place on the grounds used by its member clubs. This ban remained in effect until July 1971.

Men's tournament
Women's tournament
Tournaments
Qualifications
Squads

Languages

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