Fokker XB-8

The Fokker XB-8 was a bomber built for the United States Army Air Corps in the 1920s, derived from the high-speed Fokker O-27 observation aircraft.

XB-8
Atlantic XB-8
Atlantic XB-8 prototype
Role Bomber
Manufacturer General Aviation Corporation.[1]
Designer Fokker
Primary user United States Army Air Corps
Number built 7 (1 XB-8 + 2 YB-8 + 4 Y1B-8), all as Y1O-27
Developed from Fokker O-27

Design and development

During assembly, the second prototype XO-27 was converted to a bomber prototype, dubbed the XB-8. While the XB-8 was much faster than existing biplane bombers, it did not have the bomb capacity to be considered for production. Two YB-8s and 4 Y1B-8s were ordered, but these were changed mid-production to Y1O-27 configuration.

The wing of the XB-8 and XO-27 was built entirely from wood, although the fuselage was constructed of steel tubes covered with fabric with the exception of the nose which had a corrugated metal.[1] They featured the first retractable landing gear ever fitted to an Army Air Corps bomber or observation craft. The undercarriage retracted electrically. Crew was three in tandem position.[1]

Operational history

It competed against a design submitted by Douglas Aircraft Company, the Y1B-7/XO-36. Both promised to greatly exceed the performance of the large biplane bombers then used by the Army Air Corps. However, the Douglas XB-7 was markedly better in performance than the XB-8, and no further versions of Fokker's aircraft were built.

Operators

 United States

Specifications (XB-8)

Data from Fokker's Twilight[2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 4
  • Length: 47 ft 4 in (14.42 m)
  • Wingspan: 64 ft 4 in (19.60 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 6 in (3.50 m)
  • Wing area: 619 ft² (57.5 m²)
  • Empty weight: 6,861 lb (3,112 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 10,650 lb (4,824 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Curtiss V-1570-23 "Conqueror" V12 engines, 600 hp (450 kW) each

Performance

See also

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

Related lists

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Cellier, Alfred (23 August 1934), "American Military Monoplanes", Flight, p. 864
  2. ^ Pelletier 2005, p. 64.

Bibliography

  • Pelletier, Alain J. "Fokker Twilight". Air Enthusiast, No. 117, May/June 2005, pp. 62–66. ISSN 0143-5450.
  • Wagner, Ray. American Combat Planes. New York: Doubleday, 1982. ISBN 0-930083-17-2.

External links

Atlantic Aircraft

Atlantic Aircraft Corporation, also known as Fokker-America and Atlantic-Fokker, was a US subsidiary of the Dutch Fokker Company, responsible for sales and information about Fokker imports, and eventually constructing various Fokker designs.

Douglas Y1B-7

The Douglas Y1B-7 was a 1930s United States bomber aircraft. It was the first US monoplane given the B- 'bomber' designation. The monoplane was more practical and less expensive than the biplane, and the United States Army Air Corps chose to experiment with monoplanes for this reason. At the time the XB-7 was ordered, it was being tested by Douglas Aircraft as an observational plane.

Fokker

Fokker was a Dutch aircraft manufacturer named after its founder, Anthony Fokker. The company operated under several different names, starting out in 1912 in Schwerin, Germany, moving to the Netherlands in 1919.

During its most successful period in the 1920s and 1930s, it dominated the civil aviation market. Fokker went into bankruptcy in 1996, and its operations were sold to competitors.

Keystone B-6

The Keystone B-6 was a biplane bomber developed by the Keystone Aircraft company for the United States Army Air Corps.

List of United States bomber aircraft

This is a list of United States bomber aircraft

List of bomber aircraft

The following is a list of bomber airplanes and does not include bomber airships, organized by era and manufacturer. A bomber is a military aircraft designed to attack ground or sea targets.

List of cancelled military projects

This is a list of cancelled military projects.

Fokker aircraft
Company designations
pre-1918
Austro-Hungarian
military designations
German military
designations
Company designations
post-1918
Fokker America
United States
military designations
USAAS/USAAC/USAAF/USAF bomber designations, Army/Air Force and Tri-Service systems
Original sequences
(1924–1930)
Main sequence
(1930–1962)
Long-range Bomber
(1935–1936)
Non-sequential
Tri-Service sequence
(1962–current)
USAAC/USAAF observation aircraft
Observation
Observation Amphibian

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