Flycatcher-shrike

The flycatcher-shrikes are two species of small Asian passerine bird belonging to the genus Hemipus. They are now usually placed in the Vangidae.

Flycatcher-shrike
Hemipus hirundinaceus
Black-winged flycatcher-shrike (H. hirundinaceus)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Vangidae
Genus: Hemipus
Hodgson, 1844
Species

Description

They are 12.5 to 14.5 cm (4.9 to 5.7 in) in length.[1] They are slender birds with fairly long wings and tails. The bill and feet are black.[2] The plumage is dark above and pale below with white on the rump. The bar-winged flycatcher-shrike has a large white patch on the wing which the black-winged flycatcher-shrike lacks.[1]

Distribution and range

They are found in broad-leaved forest, forest edge and secondary forest in southern Asia. Both species have large ranges and are not considered to be threatened. The bar-winged flycatcher-shrike occurs in the Indian Subcontinent, south-west China, mainland South-east Asia and on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo.[1] The black-winged flycatcher-shrike is found in the Malay Peninsula and on Sumatra, Borneo, Java and Bali.[2]

Behaviour

They forage actively in the forest canopy for insects. They are often found in groups and frequently join mixed-species foraging flocks.[2] They will also catch insects in flight.[3]

The nest is cup-shaped and built on a tree branch. Two or three eggs are laid; they are greenish or pinkish with darker markings.[1] Both parents are involved in building the nest, incubating the eggs and rearing the young.[3]

Species list

Image Scientific name Common Name Distribution
Black-winged Flycatcher-Shrike - Gunung Gede - West Java MG 3861 (29773557386) Hemipus hirundinaceus Black-winged flycatcher-shrike Malay Peninsula to Sumatra, Borneo, Java and Bali.
Bar-Winged flycatcher Shrike DSC3833 Hemipus picatus Bar-winged flycatcher-shrike Western Ghats of India

See also

The two shrike-flycatcher species of Africa are also occasionally known as flycatcher-shrikes:

References

  1. ^ a b c d Robson, Craig (2002) A Field Guide to the Birds of South-east Asia, New Holland, London.
  2. ^ a b c MacKinnon, John & Phillipps, Karen (1993) A Field Guide to the Birds of Borneo, Sumatra, Java and Bali, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  3. ^ a b Perrins, Christopher, ed. (2004) The New Encyclopedia of Birds, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Bar-winged flycatcher-shrike

The bar-winged flycatcher-shrike (Hemipus picatus) is a small passerine bird usually placed in the Vangidae. It is found in the forests of tropical southern Asia from the Himalayas and hills of southern India to Indonesia. Mainly insectivorous it is found hunting in the mid-canopy of forests, often joining mixed-species foraging flocks. They perch upright and have a distinctive pattern of black and white, males being more shiny black than the females. In some populations the colour of the back is brownish while others have a dark wash on the underside.

Black-winged flycatcher-shrike

The black-winged flycatcher-shrike (Hemipus hirundinaceus) is a species of bird in the flycatcher-shrike genus, Hemipus. It is usually placed in the Vangidae. It is found in the Malay Peninsula and the Greater Sunda Islands. Its natural habitats are lowland forests and sometimes swamps and mangroves. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has assessed it as being of least concern.

Idamalayar Dam

Idamalayar Dam (Malayalam: ഇടമലയാർ അണക്കെട്ട്) is a multipurpose concrete gravity dam located at Ennakal,

near Bhoothathankettu, on the Idamalayar River, a tributary of the Periyar River in Kerala, South India. Completed in 1985, with a length of 373 metres (1,224 ft), the dam created a multipurpose reservoir covering 28.3 km2 (10.9 sq mi) in the scenic hills of the Western Ghats.The reservoir storage is utilized by a hydroelectric power station which has an

installed capacity of 75 MW with two units of 37.5 MW capacity, producing an annual energy output of 380 GW·h.The large reservoir created by the Idamalayar Dam is operated by the Kerala State Electricity Board to augment its peak power generation requirements. The dam will benefit the Idamalayar Irrigation Development Project by diverting water released from the tail race channel of the Idamalayar power station.

List of birds of Bangladesh

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Bangladesh. The avifauna of Bangladesh include a total of 466 species, of which one has been introduced by humans, and twelve are rare or accidental. Three species listed are extirpated in Bangladesh and are not included in the species count. Thirty-five species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Bangladesh.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fall into any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Bangladesh

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Bangladesh as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in Bangladesh although populations exist elsewhere

List of birds of Brunei

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Brunei. The avifauna of Brunei include a total of 456 species, of which four are endemic, one has been introduced by humans, and one is rare or accidental. Twenty-five species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of the Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Brunei.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories, but not all species fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Brunei

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Brunei

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Brunei as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Cambodia

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Cambodia. The avifauna of Cambodia include a total of 553 species, of which 2 have been introduced by humans. Of these, 25 species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced species are included in the total species counts for Cambodia.

The following tag has been used to highlight introduced species. The commonly occurring native species are untagged.

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Cambodia as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Coimbatore

This article lists the birds found in various places in and around the Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India. Over 285 species of birds have been recorded in and around Coimbatore.

List of birds of India

This is a list of the bird species of India and includes extant and recently extinct species recorded within the political limits of the Republic of India as defined by the Indian government are known to have around 1266 species as of 2016, of which sixty-one are endemic to the country, one has been introduced by humans and twenty-five are rare or accidental. Two species are suspected have been extirpated in India and eighty-two species are globally threatened. The Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus) is the national bird of India. This list does not cover species in Indian jurisdiction areas such as Dakshin Gangothri and oceanic species are delineated by an arbitrary cutoff distance. The list does not include fossil bird species or escapees from captivity.

Two of the most recently discovered birds of India are the Himalayan forest thrush and Bugun liocichla both discovered in Arunachal Pradesh in 2016 and 2006. Also, a few birds considered to be extinct, such as the Jerdon's courser, have been rediscovered. Several species have been elevated from subspecies to full species.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories. The commonly occurring native species do not fit within any of these categories.

(A) Accidental - Also known as a rarity, it refers to a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in India-typically less than ten confirmed records.

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to India

(Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in India although populations exist elsewhere

(NB) Non-breeding range

List of birds of Malaysia

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Malaysia. The avifauna of Malaysia include a total of 781 species, of which four are endemic, three have been introduced by humans and ten are rare or accidental. Forty-five species are globally threatened.

This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) follow the conventions of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition. The family accounts at the beginning of each heading reflect this taxonomy, as do the species counts found in each family account. Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Malaysia.

The following tags have been used to highlight several categories, but not all species fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species.

(A) Accidental - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Malaysia

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Malaysia

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Malaysia as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

List of birds of Singapore

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Singapore. The avifauna of Singapore include a total of approximately 400 species. In addition, there are some ornamental birds, escapees and free-ranging birds from the Singapore Zoo, Jurong Bird Park and private aviaries.

List of birds of South India

This list of birds of South India includes bird from India south approximately of the Narmada River.

Rollapadu in Andhra Pradesh, Nagarhole (Rajiv Gandhi National Park) and Bandipur National Park in Karnataka; Rajamalai (Eravikulam National Park) and Periyar National Park in Kerala; Mudumalai National Park, Udhagamandalam, Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary in Anamalai, Vedanthangal and Point Calimere Wildlife and Bird Sanctuary in Kodikkarai, Tamil Nadu are notable bird watching locations in South India.

List of birds of Sumatra

Sumatra is one of the richest islands in Indonesia for animals. Its bird total species is second only to New Guinea. This great wealth is due to the large size of Sumatra, its diversity of habitat and also its past link with the Asian mainland. This following list of birds is based on the taxonomic treatment and scientific nomenclature of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 6th edition.

List of birds of Tamil Nadu

This article lists the birds found in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Over 508 species of birds have been spotted in Tamil Nadu. The list also sometimes includes the local Tamil name in italics following the English common name.

List of birds of Thailand

The birds of Thailand included 1069 species as of April 2019. Of them, more than 100 are rare or accidental, five have been introduced by humans, and eight have been extirpated. Seventy one of the country's species are globally threatened.The birds of Thailand are mainly typical of the Indomalaya ecozone, with affinities to the Indian subcontinent to the west, and, particularly in Southern Thailand, with the Sundaic fauna to the southeast. The northern mountains are outliers of the Tibetan Plateau, with many species of montane birds, and in winter the avifauna is augmented by migrants from the eastern Palearctic and Himalayas. That Thailand's habitats are contiguous with those of neighbouring countries explains the low number of endemic species.

In 1991, it was estimated that 159 resident and 23 migratory species were endangered or vulnerable due to forest clearance, illegal logging, hunting and habitat degradation, especially in the lowlands. The species most affected are large water birds whose wetland habitat has been largely lost to agriculture, and forest species, as deforestation for agriculture and logging have removed and degraded portions of the woodlands.This list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) are those of The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World, 2018 edition. The designations as accidental, introduced, and extirpated, and the notes of worldwide population status such as "critically endangered", are from Bird Checklists of the World. The notes of status in Thailand, such as "winter visitor", are from Lekagul and Round (1991). Species with no indicated status are resident or partially resident non-rarities.

Sibley-Monroe checklist 13

The Sibley-Monroe checklist was a landmark document in the study of birds. It drew on extensive DNA-DNA hybridisation studies to reassess the relationships between modern birds.

Templer Park

Templer Park (Malay: Hutan Lipur Templer) is a forest reserve in Rawang, Gombak District, Selangor, Malaysia. It is 1,214 hectares in size and it was named in honour of Sir Gerald Templer, a British High Commissioner in Malaya. "On 8 September 1954, His Highness the Sultan of Selangor, the late Sultan Hishamuddin Alam Shah declared that Templer’s Park was 'dedicated by Selangor to serve as a refuge and a sanctuary for wildlife and a meeting-place for all who love and respect the beauty of nature'. The following year the government gazetted the area as “a Botanical Garden and Public Park” under the land enactment (Notification 104-1955)".This forest reserve consists of multi-tiered waterfalls, jungle streams and trails. Several amenities are available in this forest reserve, such as picnic grounds, fishing spots, parking lots, public toilets and stalls.

Wildlife that can be spotted in Templer's Park include the park monkey, the hawk-cuckoo, the crested serpent eagle, the emerald dove, the forest wagtail, malkohas, the barbet, the woodpecker, the flycatcher-shrike, the blue-winged leafbird, the earless agamid, the Malaysian crested lizard, various kinds of toads and snakes and serow (goat-antelopes). Studies by Malaysian Nature Society have confirmed that there is still a population of serow living in the vicinity.Templar Park is the type locality where the holotype of the Malaysian spine-jawed snake Xenophidion schaeferi was collected in 1988. To date this is the only known specimen of this rare snake, which belongs in the obscure and primitive snake family Xenophidiidae. The family contains only one other species, X. acanthognathus, also only known from its holotype, which was collected in Sabah, northeast Borneo. These snakes are harmless, nonvenomous, and thought to feed on earthworms or insect larvae.

Vanga

The Vangidae family (from vanga, Malagasy for the hook-billed vanga, Vanga curvirostris) comprises a group of often shrike-like medium-sized birds distributed from Asia to Africa, including the vangas of Madagascar to which the family owes its name. Many species in this family were previously classified elsewhere in other families. Recent molecular techniques made it possible to assign these species to Vangidae, thereby solving several taxonomic enigmas.

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