Flight sergeant

Flight sergeant (commonly abbreviated to Flt Sgt, F/Sgt, FSGT or, currently correctly in the RAF, FS) is a senior non-commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and several other air forces which have adopted all or part of the RAF rank structure. It is equivalent to a staff sergeant or colour sergeant in the British Army, a colour sergeant in the Royal Marines, and a chief petty officer in the Royal Navy, and has a NATO rank code of OR-7. In the RAF, flight sergeant ranks above chief technician and below warrant officer.

RAF Flight Sgt
A Royal Air Force flight sergeant

History

The rank was introduced into the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) in 1912 and passed to the Royal Air Force on its formation in 1918. RFC flight sergeants wore a four-bladed propeller between the chevrons and the crown.

On 1 July 1946, aircrew flight sergeants were redesignated aircrew I and replaced their chevrons with three six-pointed stars within a wreath and surmounted by an eagle and a crown. This proved unpopular however, and in 1950 they reverted to their old rank and badge, although flight sergeants aircrew wear an eagle between chevrons and crown.

Between 1950 and 1964, the rank of chief technician was equivalent to flight sergeant and was held instead of that rank by technicians, but now chief technician is a junior rank (still held only by technicians), although classified by NATO in the same grade.

Current usage

OR7b RAF Flight Sergeant

Rank badge of a Royal Air Force flight sergeant

OR7c RAF Flight Sergeant Acr

Rank badge of a Royal Air Force flight sergeant aircrew

RAF-Flt Sgt-OR-7

Rank badge of a Royal Air Force flight sergeant as it appears on dress uniform

RAF-Flt Sgt AC-OR-7

Rank badge of a Royal Air Force flight sergeant aircrew as it appears on dress uniform

Apart from the RAF, the rank of flight sergeant is also used by many Commonwealth air forces, including the Royal Australian Air Force, the Royal New Zealand Air Force, the Sri Lanka Air Force, the Ghana Air Force, the Bangladesh Air Force, the Sri Lanka Air Force, the South African Air Force and the Air Force of Zimbabwe. It was also used in the former Royal Rhodesian Air Force. In Canada, since the unification of the Canadian Forces in 1968, this rank has been replaced by warrant officer. It is also used in the Irish Air Corps, where it is equivalent to the Irish Army rank of company sergeant. The flight sergeant rank in the Indian Air Force was replaced with the rank of junior warrant officer (JWO), which ranks below a warrant officer and above a sergeant.

In the RAF, the rank insignia is three downward pointing chevrons below a crown. Flight sergeants are usually addressed as "flight" and never by the more junior rank of "sergeant".

Flight sergeant is also used in many cadet organisations around the world, such as the Air Training Corps, Combined Cadet Force (RAF Section), Australian Air Force Cadets, and Royal Canadian Air Cadets.

See also

1945 Birthday Honours

The King's Birthday Honours 1945, celebrating the official birthday of King George VI, were announced on 14 June 1945 for the United Kingdom and British Empire.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1946 Birthday Honours (New Zealand)

The 1946 King's Birthday Honours in New Zealand, celebrating the official birthday of King George VI, were appointments made by the King on the advice of the New Zealand government to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by New Zealanders. They were announced on 13 June 1946.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour.

1952 New Year Honours

The New Year Honours 1952 were appointments by King George VI to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of the British Empire and Commonwealth. They were announced on 1 January 1952 for the British Empire, Australia, New Zealand, Ceylon, and Pakistan to celebrate the past year and mark the beginning of 1952.

The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1954 New Year Honours

The New Year Honours 1954 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. They were announced on 1 January 1954 to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 1954.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1956 Birthday Honours

The Queen's Birthday Honours 1956 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. The appointments were made to celebrate the official birthday of The Queen.

They were published for the United Kingdom and Colonies, Australia, and New Zealand on 25 May 1956.

The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1957 New Year Honours

The New Year Honours 1957 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. They were announced in supplements to the London Gazette of 28 December 1956 to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 1957.At this time honours for Australians were awarded both in the United Kingdom honours, on the advice of the premiers of Australian states, and also in a separate Australia honours list.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

1958 New Year Honours

The New Year Honours 1958 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. They were announced in supplements to the London Gazette of 31 December 1957 to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 1958.At this time honours for Australians were awarded both in the United Kingdom honours, on the advice of the premiers of Australian states, and also in a separate Australia honours list.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

Baldock Cemetery

Baldock Cemetery is the burial ground for the market town of Baldock in North Hertfordshire and the surrounding area. It is maintained by North Hertfordshire District Council.Baldock Cemetery opened in the early twentieth century when the churchyard of the nearby Church of St Mary the Virgin was closed for burials. Access to the cemetery is via a drive from The Sycamores, which is off Norton Road in Baldock. The cemetery is open for the burial of people of all faiths.Seven casualties from both World Wars are buried here, two from World War I and five from World War II including Flight Sergeant Cyril Ivan Walker of 49 Squadron, who was killed when the Lancaster bomber he was in crashed on take-off in April 1945; these graves are distinguished by Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstones.It has been stated that the cemetery will be full by about 2020. An attempt by The Baldock Society in 2012 to gauge whether there was local support for a new cemetery in Baldock was met with little interest.

Bury Road, Lawshall

Bury Road, Lawshall is a linear settlement in the civil parish of Lawshall in the Babergh district in the county of Suffolk, England. The northern part of the settlement is in the civil parish of Bradfield Combust with Stanningfield in St Edmundsbury. Bury Road is located between Hawstead and Lambs Lane / The Glebe and is two miles off the A134 between Bury St Edmunds and Sudbury.

Chief technician

Chief technician (Chf Tech or formerly C/T) is a non-commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force which is only held by airmen in technical trades and by musicians. It is between sergeant and flight sergeant and, like the latter has a NATO code of OR-7. Airmen in non-technical trades progress directly from sergeant to flight sergeant. Along with junior technician this is a survivor of a separate ranking system for technicians introduced in 1950 and abolished in 1964. During that period it was equivalent to flight sergeant, but was made junior to that rank in 1964. Chief technicians are usually addressed as "Chief".

Comparative air force enlisted ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of enlisted rank for Air Forces of African states.

Comparative air force enlisted ranks of Asia

Rank comparison chart of air forces of Asian states.

Comparative air force enlisted ranks of Europe

Rank comparison chart of air forces enlisted personnel of European states.

Comparative air force enlisted ranks of Oceania

Rank comparison chart of air forces of Oceanian states.

Comparative air force enlisted ranks of the Commonwealth

Rank comparison chart of air forces of Commonwealth of Nations states.

De Lutte

De Lutte is a village in the Dutch province of Overijssel. It is located in the municipality of Losser. It is located close to the border between the Netherlands and Germany. De Lutte is connected to Germany (to the east) and Oldenzaal and Hengelo (to the west) by the A1.

The Landhuishotel Bloemenbeek with its Michelin-starred restaurant De Bloemenbeek is located in the village.The Losser (De Lutte) Roman Catholic Churchyard contains the graves of five Second World War soldiers who served with the Royal Air Force. Three of the deceased soldiers served with the United Kingdom while the remaining two served with Australia. The graves are for sergeant Sydney Hennan, sergeant William Leonard Wykes, flight sergeant Conrad George Johnston, sergeant John Fisher Morgan and flight sergeant John Kevin Thompson.

RAF other ranks

The term used in the Royal Air Force (RAF) to refer to all ranks below commissioned officer level is other ranks (ORs). It includes warrant officers (WOs), non-commissioned officers (NCOs) and airmen.

Royal Canadian Air Cadets

The Royal Canadian Air Cadets (French: Cadets de l'aviation royale du Canada) is a Canadian national youth program for young individuals aged 12 to 19. Under the authority of the National Defence Act, the program is administered by the Canadian Forces (CF) and funded through the Department of National Defence (DND). Additional support is provided by the civilian Air Cadet League of Canada (ACL). Together with the Royal Canadian Sea Cadets and Royal Canadian Army Cadets, it forms the "largest federally funded youth program in the country". Cadets are not members of the military and are not obliged to join the Canadian Forces.The first squadrons were established in 1941 to train young men for duties during World War II. The purpose has since changed to focus on citizenship, leadership, physical fitness, general aviation and stimulating an interest in the activities of the Canadian Forces.

The majority of cadet training takes place at the local squadron during the regular school year, with a percentage of cadets selected for summer training courses at various cadet summer training centres located across Canada. Central to the air cadet program are the gliding and flying scholarships offered to air cadets who qualify. One in five private pilots in Canada is an ex-air cadet, and 67% of commercial and airline pilots began their careers as an air cadet. There are 453 squadrons located across the country with enrollment of over 26,000 Air Cadets.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.