First lieutenant

First lieutenant is a commissioned officer military rank in many armed forces and, in some forces, an appointment.

The rank of lieutenant has different meanings in different military formations (see comparative military ranks), but the majority of cases it is common for it to be sub-divided into a senior (first lieutenant) and junior (second lieutenant) rank. The NATO equivalent rank for land force officers is OF-1 rank. In navies, while certain rank insignia may carry the name: "lieutenant", the term may also be used to relate to a particular post or duty, rather than a rank.

Navies Armies Air forces
Commissioned officers
Admiral of
the fleet
Field marshal or
General of the Army
Marshal of
the air force
Admiral General Air chief marshal
Vice admiral Lieutenant general Air marshal
Rear admiral Major general Air vice-marshal
Commodore Brigadier or
brigadier general
Air commodore
Captain Colonel Group captain
Commander Lieutenant colonel Wing commander
Lieutenant
commander
Major or
Commandant
Squadron leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight lieutenant
Lieutenant
junior grade
or
sub-lieutenant
Lieutenant or
first lieutenant
Flying officer
Ensign or
midshipman
Second lieutenant Pilot officer
Officer cadet Officer cadet Flight cadet
Enlisted grades
Warrant officer or
chief petty officer
Warrant officer or
sergeant major
Warrant officer
Petty officer Sergeant Sergeant
Leading seaman Corporal or
bombardier
Corporal
Seaman Private or
gunner or
trooper
Aircraftman or
airman
Talk·View

United Kingdom

British Army

In the British Army and Royal Marines, the rank above second lieutenant is simply lieutenant (pronounced lef-tenant), with no ordinal attached.

Before 1871, when the whole British Army switched to using the current rank of "lieutenant", the Royal Artillery, Royal Engineers and fusilier regiments used "first lieutenant" and "second lieutenant".

Royal Navy

The first lieutenant (often abbreviated "1st Lt") in a Royal Navy ship is a post or appointment, rather than a rank.

Historically the lieutenants in a ship were ranked in accordance with seniority, with the most senior being termed the first lieutenant and acting as the second-in-command, unless the ship was complemented with a commander. Although lieutenants are no longer ranked by seniority, the post of "first lieutenant" remains. In minor war vessels, destroyers, frigates, and submarines, the first lieutenant is second in command, executive officer (XO) and head of the executive branch; in larger ships where a commander of the warfare specialization is appointed as the executive officer, a first lieutenant is appointed as his deputy. The post of first lieutenant in a shore establishment carries a similar responsibility to the first lieutenant of a capital ship. Colloquial terms in the Royal Navy for the first lieutenant include "number one", "the jimmy" (or "jimmy the one") and "James the First" (a back-formation referring to James I of England).[1]

United States

U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Air Force insignia of the rank of first lieutenant. Style and method of wear vary between the services.
Army-USA-OF-01a
U.S. Army insignia of the rank of first lieutenant.
US Marine O2 shoulderboard
U.S. Marine Corps insignia of the rank of first lieutenant.
US Air Force O2 shoulderboard
U.S. Air Force insignia of the rank of first lieutenant.

U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Air Force

In the U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Air Force, a first lieutenant is a junior commissioned officer. It is just above the rank of second lieutenant and just below the rank of captain. It is equivalent to the rank of lieutenant (junior grade) in the other uniformed services.

Promotion to first lieutenant is governed by Department of Defense policies derived from the Defense Officer Personnel Management Act of 1980. DOPMA guidelines suggest all "fully qualified" officers should be promoted to first lieutenant. A second lieutenant (grade O-1) is usually promoted to first lieutenant (grade O-2) after 18 months in the Army or 24 months in the Marine Corps and Air Force. The difference between the two ranks is slight, primarily being experience and a higher pay grade. It is not uncommon to see officers moved to positions requiring more experience after promotion to first lieutenant. For example, in the Army and Marine Corps these positions can include leading a specialty platoon, or assignment as the executive officer for a company-sized unit (70–250 soldiers or marines). In the Air Force, a first lieutenant may be a flight commander or section's officer in charge with varied supervisory responsibilities, including supervision of as many as 100+ personnel, although in a flying unit, a first lieutenant is a rated officer (pilot, navigator, or air battle manager) who has just finished training for his career field and has few supervisory responsibilities.

Note: U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) first lieutenant insignia bars have squared off edges.[2]

U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard

In the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, "first lieutenant" is the name of a billet and position title, rather than that of a rank. Officers aboard early sailing ships were the captain and a number of lieutenants. The senior among those lieutenants was known as the first lieutenant, and would have assumed command if the captain was absent or incapacitated.[3] As modern ships have become more complex, requiring specialized knowledge of engineering, communications, and weapons, the "first lieutenant" is the officer in command of the deck department responsible for line handling during mooring and underway replenishment. On smaller ships, the officer of the "first lieutenant" billet holds the rank of lieutenant, junior grade or ensign. On larger vessels, the position of "first lieutenant" is held by a lieutenant or, in the case of extremely large warships such as cruisers or aircraft carriers, the position of "first lieutenant" may be held by a lieutenant commander or even commander. However, on submarines and in aircraft squadrons, where the deck department may only have a few junior sailors, the "first lieutenant" billet may be filled by a first-class petty officer or chief petty officer. What is known in the U.S. Navy as the "first lieutenant division" is usually composed of junior sailors (E-3 and below) who are completing their ninety days of temporary assigned duty, or TAD, that all enlisted personnel are required to perform when initially assigned to a command. The primary mission of the division is servicing, cleaning, organizing and inventorying items within a command.[4]

U.S. Revenue Cutter Service

The term "first lieutenant" had a dual meaning in the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service. The position title of first lieutenant was held by a junior officer who was in charge of deck operations and gunnery. The rank of first lieutenant was the equivalent to lieutenant in the current rank structure of the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Navy. The next senior officer ranking above first lieutenant was captain and the next two lower officer ranks were second and third lieutenant, respectively. The rank of first lieutenant carried over to the formation of the U.S. Coast Guard in 1915 and was used until 1918, when the rank structure of the U.S. Navy was adopted.[5]

Indonesia

Lettu pdh ad
The First lieutenant rank insignia of the Indonesian Army

In Indonesia, "First lieutenant" is known as Letnan Satu (Lettu). The Lieutenant rank has two levels, which are: Letda pdh ad.png Second lieutenant (Letda) and Lettu pdh ad.png First lieutenant (Lettu).

Israel

IDF Ranks Kama
IDF Rank:(קצין מקצועי אקדמאי (קמ"א - Katsín miktsoí akademai (Kama) - Professional Academic Officer

In the Israel Defense Forces, the rank above second lieutenant is simply lieutenant. The rank of (קצין מקצועי אקדמאי (קמ"א (katsín miktsoí akademai or "kama"), a professional academic officer (that is, a medical, dental or veterinary officer, a justice officer or a religious officer), is equivalent to a professional officer of the second class in the reserve and equivalent to first lieutenant.

Other countries

For other countries, the equivalent rank to a US Army first lieutenant (O-2) is listed below.

  • Afghanistan: Lomri baridman
  • Albania: Toger
  • Angola: Primeiro tenente
  • Arabic-speaking countries except former French colonies in North Africa: Mulazim awwal
  • Argentina: Teniente primero (army); primer teniente (air force)
  • Australia: Army lieutenant (pronounced left-enant); Royal Australian Navy sub-lieutenant (pronounced "loo-tenant")
  • Austria: Oberleutnant
  • Azerbaijan: Baş leytenant
  • Belarus: Старший лейтенант (Russian), старшы лейтэнант (starshy leytenant) (Belarusian)
  • Belgium: Lieutenant (French); luitenant (Dutch)
  • Bhutan: Deda gom
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina: Poručnik
  • Bolivia: Subteniente
  • Brazil: Primeiro tenente
  • Bulgaria: Cтарши лейтенант (starshiy leytenant)
  • Cambodia: Ak-no-say-ney-tor
  • Canada: Lieutenant
  • Cape Verde: Primeiro tenente
  • Imperial China (Qing Dynasty): 副軍校 (Fù jūn xiào)
  • People's Republic of China: 中尉 (Zhōngwèi)
  • Republic of China (Taiwan): 中尉(Chungwei)
  • Croatia: Natporučnik
  • Cuba: Primer teniente
  • Chile: Teniente
  • Cyprus: Ypolokhagos (army); yposminagos (air force); anthypoploiarchos (navy)
  • Czech Republic (and former Czechoslovakia): Nadporučík
  • Denmark: Premierløjtnant
  • Dominican Republic: Primer teniente
  • Estonia: Leitnant
  • Ethiopia: መቶ አለቃ (Meto Aleqa)
  • Finland: Yliluutnantti
  • France and all other French-speaking countries: Lieutenant (air force/army), enseigne de vaisseau de première classe (navy)
  • Georgia: უფროსი ლეიტენანტი (Up’rosi leytenanti)
  • Germany: Oberleutnant
  • Greece: Ypolokhagos (army); yposminagos (air force); anthypoploiarchos (navy)
  • Hungary: Főhadnagy
  • Indonesia: Letnan satu
  • Iran: ستوان یكم (Setvan yekom)
  • Republic of Ireland: Lieutenant (English); lefteanant (Irish)
  • Israel: סגן (Segen)
  • Italy: Tenente
  • Imperial Japan: Rikugun-Chūsa 陸軍中佐
  • Japan: Nitō rikui 2等陸尉 (or Nii 2尉) (modern) / Chūi 中尉 (historical)
  • Jordan: ملازم أول (Moulazem awal)
  • Kazakhstan: Старший лейтенант (Russian), аға лейтенант (Kazakh)
  • North Korea and South Korea: 중위 (Jungwi)
  • Laos: Roithõäkäd
  • Latvia: Virsleitnants
  • Lithuania: Vyresnysis leitenantas
  • Luxembourg: Premier lieutenant
  • Malaysia: Leftenan
  • Mexico: Teniente primero
  • Nepal: Upa-senani
  • Republic of Macedonia: Поручник (poručnik)
  • Mongolia: Ахлах дэслэгч (Ahlah deslegch)
  • Morocco: "Lkowad"
  • Mozambique: Tenente
  • Netherlands: Eerste luitenant
  • Nicaragua: Teniente primero
  • Norway: Løytnant
  • Pakistan: Lieutenant (army)
  • Paraguay: Teniente primero
  • Philippines: First lieutenant (English); pulimagat (Tagalog); primero teniente (Philippine Spanish)
  • Poland: Porucznik
  • Portugal: Tenente
  • Romania: Locotenent (current); locotenent-major (Warsaw Pact)
  • Russia: Russian: Старший лейтенант (Starshy leytenant)
  • Serbia: Поручник (poručnik)
  • Singapore: Lieutenant
  • Slovakia: Slovak: Nadporučík
  • Slovenia: Nadporočnik
  • Somalia: Dagaal
  • Spain and all other Spanish-speaking countries except Argentina, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Paraguay and Uruguay: Teniente
  • Suriname: Luitenant
  • Sweden: Löjtnant
  • Switzerland: German: Oberleutnant; French: premier-lieutenant; Italian: primotenente
  • Thailand: Roi tho
  • Tunisia: ملازم أول (moulazem awal)
  • Turkey: Üsteğmen
  • Ukraine: Ukrainian: Cтарший лейтенант, translit. starshyy leytenant
  • Uruguay: Teniente primero
  • Uzbekistan: Katta leytenant
  • Vietnam: Thượng úy
  • Venezuela: Primer teniente
  • Yugoslavia: Поручник (poručnik)

Notes

Citations
  1. ^ Partridge, p 612, p 621, p 884
  2. ^ Marine Corps Uniform Regulations, p 4-21
  3. ^ Hayes, David. "Ranks & Duties". Historic Naval Fiction. Retrieved 22 April 2018.
  4. ^ Barnebey, Matthew; "1st Lieutenant Division plays significant role in supporting base", Jax Air News
  5. ^ Cipra, Dave; "A History of Sea Service Ranks & Titles", Commandant's Bulletin, (May, June, July 1985), U.S. Coast Guard Historian's Office.
References used
  • Marine Corps Uniform Regulations, Marine Corps Order P1020.34G with changes 1-5, Chapter 4. Insignia and Regulations for Wear, Sec. 4005. Insignia of Grade, Officers, Para. 2. Description by Grade, h. Captain, i. First Lieutenant, j. Second Lieutenant (p. 4-25) and Figure 4-11. Officers' Grade Insignia (Shoulder/Collar). Washington, DC: United States Marine Corps.
  • Barnebey, Matthew (29 June 2011). "1st Lieutenant Division plays significant role in supporting base". Jax Air News. Jacksonville.com website. Retrieved 6 May 2014.
  • Cipra, Dave (May 1985). "A History of Sea Service Ranks & Titles" (PDF). Commandant's Bulletin. U.S. Coast Guard Historian's Office. Retrieved 6 May 2014.
  • Partridge, Eric (1984). A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (8th ed.). London and New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-0025949805.
Captain (United States O-3)

In the United States Army (USA), U.S. Marine Corps (USMC), and U.S. Air Force (USAF), captain (abbreviated "CPT" in the USA and "Capt" in the USMC and USAF) is a company grade officer rank, with the pay grade of O-3. It ranks above first lieutenant and below major. It is equivalent to the rank of lieutenant in the Navy/Coast Guard officer rank system. The insignia for the rank consists of two silver bars, with slight stylized differences between the Army/Air Force version and the Marine Corps version.

Company (military unit)

A company is a military unit, typically consisting of 80–150 soldiers and usually commanded by a major or a captain. Most companies are formed of three to six platoons, although the exact number may vary by country, unit type, and structure.

Usually several companies are grouped as a battalion or regiment, the latter of which is sometimes formed by several battalions. Occasionally, independent or separate companies are organized for special purposes, such as the 1st Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company or the 3rd Force Reconnaissance Company. These companies are not organic to a battalion or regiment, but rather report directly to a higher level organization such as a Marine Expeditionary Force headquarters (i.e., a corps-level command).

Comparative air force officer ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of air forces of African states.

Comparative air force officer ranks of Asia

Rank comparison chart of air forces of Asian states.

Comparative army officer ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of African states.

Comparative army officer ranks of Asia

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of Asian states.

Note: Since none of the countries on this list are part of NATO, the conversion to equivalent NATO ranks are approximate.

Comparative army officer ranks of the Commonwealth

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of Commonwealth of Nations states.

Distinguished Flying Cross (United States)

The Distinguished Flying Cross is a military decoration awarded to any officer or enlisted member of the United States Armed Forces who distinguishes himself in support of operations by "heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight, subsequent to November 11, 1918."

Lieutenant

A lieutenant (abbreviated Lt, LT, Lieut and similar) is a junior mostcommissioned officer in the armed forces, fire services, police and other organizations of many nations.

The meaning of lieutenant differs in different militaries (see comparative military ranks), but is often subdivided into senior (first lieutenant) and junior (second lieutenant and even third lieutenant) ranks. In navies it is often equivalent to the army rank of captain; it may also indicate a particular post rather than a rank. The rank is also used in fire services, emergency medical services, security services and police forces.

Lieutenant may also appear as part of a title used in various other organisations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command", and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it. For example, a "lieutenant master" is likely to be second-in-command to the "master" in an organisation using both ranks.

Political uses include lieutenant governor in various governments, and Quebec lieutenant in Canadian politics. In the United Kingdom, a lord lieutenant is the sovereign's representative in a county or lieutenancy area, while a deputy lieutenant is one of the lord lieutenant's deputies.

Lieutenant (British Army and Royal Marines)

Lieutenant (UK: ; Lt) is a junior officer rank in the British Army and Royal Marines. It ranks above second lieutenant and below captain and has a NATO ranking code of OF-1 and it is the senior subaltern rank. Unlike some armed forces which use first lieutenant, the British rank is simply lieutenant, with no ordinal attached. The rank is equivalent to that of a flying officer in the Royal Air Force (RAF). Although formerly considered senior to a Royal Navy (RN) sub-lieutenant, the British Army and Royal Navy ranks of lieutenant and sub-lieutenant are now considered to be of equivalent status. The Army rank of lieutenant has always been junior to the Navy's rank of lieutenant.

In the 21st-century British Army, the rank is ordinarily held for up to three years. A typical appointment for a lieutenant might be the command of a platoon or troop of approximately thirty soldiers.Before 1871, when the whole British Army switched to using the current rank of "lieutenant", the Royal Artillery, Royal Engineers and Fusilier regiments used "first lieutenant" and "second lieutenant".

Lieutenant (navy)

Lieutenant (abbreviated Lt, LT, LT(N), Lt(N), Lieut and LEUT, depending on nation) is a commissioned officer rank in many nations' navies. It is typically the most senior of junior officer ranks. The rank's insignia usually consists of two medium gold braid stripes and often the uppermost stripe features an executive curl.

The now immediately senior rank of lieutenant commander was formerly a senior naval lieutenant rank. Many navies also use a subordinate rank of sub-lieutenant. The appointment of "first lieutenant" in many navies is held by a senior lieutenant.

A navy lieutenant ranks higher than an army lieutenant; the navy rank of lieutenant is a NATO OF-2 (US grade O-3) and ranks with an army captain.

List of Medal of Honor recipients for World War II

This is a list of Medal of Honor recipients for World War II. The Medal of Honor was created during the American Civil War and is the highest military decoration presented by the United States government to a member of its armed forces. The recipient must have distinguished themselves at the risk of their own life above and beyond the call of duty in action against an enemy of the United States. Due to the nature of this medal, it is commonly presented posthumously.World War II, or the Second World War, was a global military conflict, the joining of what had initially been two separate conflicts. The first began in Asia in 1937 as the Second Sino-Japanese War; the other began in Europe in 1939 with the German and Soviet invasion of Poland. This global conflict split the majority of the world's nations into two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis powers.

The United States, and its military, was drawn into World War II on December 7, 1941, when Axis-member Japan launched the Attack on Pearl Harbor and European territories in the Pacific Ocean.

For actions during World War II, 472 United States military personnel received the Medal of Honor. Seventeen of these were Japanese-Americans fighting in both Europe and the Pacific, many of which were upgraded from Distinguished Service Crosses during the Clinton administration. Additionally, Douglas Albert Munro was the only serviceman from the United States Coast Guard in United States military history to receive the Medal for his actions during the war.

The earliest action for which a U.S. serviceman earned a World War II Medal of Honor was the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor, for which seventeen U.S. servicemen were awarded a Medal. The last action to earn a contemporaneous Medal of Honor prior to the August 15, 1945, end of hostilities in World War II, were those of Melvin Mayfield, on July 29, 1945 – though several honorees may have been cited for their Medal after Mayfield's recognition on May 31, 1946. Additionally, seven African Americans and twenty-two Asian American veterans who had received the Distinguished Service Cross during the war were awarded the Medal of Honor in 1997 and 2000 – most of them posthumously – after two studies determined that racial discrimination had caused them to be overlooked at the time.

Military ranks of Bahrain

The Military ranks of Bahrain are the military insignia used by the Bahrain Defence Force. Being a former British protectorate, Bahrain shares a rank structure similar to that of United Kingdom.

Military ranks of Lebanon

The Military ranks of Lebanon are the military insignia used by the Lebanese Armed Forces, which follow a rank system similar to the French Armed Forces as a former French mandate under the League of Nations.

Military ranks of Qatar

The Military ranks of Qatar are the military insignia used by the Qatar Armed Forces. Being a former British protectorate, Qatar shares a rank structure similar to that of the United Kingdom.

Oberleutnant

Oberleutnant (OF-1a) is the highest lieutenant officer rank in the armed forces of Germany (Bundeswehr), Austrian Armed Forces, and Military of Switzerland.

Platoon

A platoon is a military unit typically composed of two or more squads/sections/patrols. Platoon organization varies depending on the country and the branch, but typically, per the official tables of organization as published in U.S. military documents; a full-strength U.S. infantry rifle platoon consists of 39 Soldiers or 43 Marines (U.S. Army [USA] or U.S. Marine Corps [USMC], respectively). There are other types of infantry platoons (e.g., antiarmor, heavy machinegun, light armored reconnaissance, mortar, reconnaissance, scout, scout sniper, and weapons), depending upon service and type of infantry company/battalion to which the platoon is assigned, and these platoons may range from as few as 18 (USMC scout sniper platoon) to 69 (USMC mortar platoon). Non-infantry platoons may range from as small as a nine-man communications platoon (USA headquarters and headquarters company [HHC], airborne, air Assault, and light infantry battalions) to a 102-man maintenance platoon (USA HHC mechanized infantry/combined arms battalion). A platoon leader or commander is the officer in command of a platoon. This person is usually a junior officer—a second or first lieutenant or an equivalent rank. The officer is usually assisted by a platoon sergeant. A platoon is typically the smallest military unit led by a commissioned officer.

Rifle platoons normally consist of a small platoon headquarters and three or four sections (Commonwealth) or squads (US). In some armies, platoon is used throughout the branches of the army. In a few armies, such as the French Army, a platoon is specifically a cavalry unit, and the infantry use "section" as the equivalent unit. A unit consisting of several platoons is called a company/battery/troop.

Robert Maynard

Robert Maynard (born 19 September 1684 – 4 January 1751) was a lieutenant and later captain in the Royal Navy. He served as first lieutenant of HMS Pearl, most famous for his part in the defeat of the notorious English pirate Blackbeard in battle. Robert Maynard was made a lieutenant on 14 January 1707. From 1709 he was third lieutenant on HMS Bedford. He became first lieutenant of HMS Pearl in 1716. He was promoted to commander in 1739, and to captain in 1740.

South Vietnamese military ranks and insignia

South Vietnamese military ranks and insignia was used by the Republic of Vietnam Military Forces, specifically the Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force. Originally, visually based around the French ranks, the ranks were changed in 1967 to resemble the US ranks more closely.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.