Film à clef

A film à clef (or cinéma à clef, movie à clef,[1] film à clé (French pronunciation: ​[film‿a kle], French for "film with a key"), is a film describing real life, behind a façade of fiction.[2] "Key" in this context means a table one can use to swap out the names.

Film à clef is the film equivalent of the literary roman à clef, and the two share the same techniques.[1]

Many films à clef are biopics of Hollywood personalities.[1]

Notable films à clef

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Films à clef - LC Linked Data Service: Authorities and Vocabularies". id.loc.gov. Library of Congress. Retrieved 16 August 2017.
  2. ^ Truffaut, François (1994). "The films in my life". Da Capo Press. p. 131. ISBN 978-0-306-80599-8. Retrieved 2012-05-01.
  3. ^ Smith, Damon (2010). Michael Winterbottom: Interviews. Univ. Press of Mississippi. p. 98. ISBN 978-1-60473-841-4.
  4. ^ Stam & Raengo 2008, p. 235.
  5. ^ Sara Anson Vaux (2014). Clint Eastwood: A Biography: A Biography. ABC-CLIO. p. 83. ISBN 978-1-4408-2998-7.

Works cited

Further reading

Acid Western

Acid Western is a subgenre of the Western film that emerged in the 1960s and 1970s that combines the metaphorical ambitions of critically acclaimed Westerns, such as Shane and The Searchers, with the excesses of the Spaghetti Westerns and the outlook of the counterculture of the 1960s. Acid Westerns subvert many of the conventions of earlier Westerns to "conjure up a crazed version of autodestructive white America at its most solipsistic, hankering after its own lost origins".

Dreamgirls (film)

Dreamgirls is a 2006 American romantic musical comedy-drama film written and directed by Bill Condon and jointly produced and released by DreamWorks Pictures and Paramount Pictures. Adapted from the 1981 Broadway musical of the same name by composer Henry Krieger and lyricist/librettist Tom Eyen, Dreamgirls is a film à clef, a work of fiction taking strong inspiration from the history of the Motown record label and one of its acts, The Supremes. The story follows the history and evolution of American R&B music during the 1960s and 1970s through the eyes of a Detroit, Michigan girl group known as the Dreams and their manipulative record executive.

The film adaptation of Dreamgirls stars Jamie Foxx, Beyoncé, Eddie Murphy, and Jennifer Hudson, and also features Danny Glover, Anika Noni Rose and Keith Robinson. Produced by Laurence Mark, the film's screenplay was adapted by director Condon from the original Broadway book by Tom Eyen. In addition to the original Kreiger/Eyen compositions, four new songs, composed by Krieger with various lyricists, were added for this film. Dreamgirls features the acting debut of Hudson, a former American Idol contestant and singer.

The film debuted in four special road show engagements starting on December 15, 2006, before its nationwide release on December 25, 2006. With a production cost of $80 million, Dreamgirls is one of the most expensive films to feature an all African-American starring cast in American cinema history. Upon its release, the film garnered positive reviews from critics, who particularly praised the performances of Hudson and Murphy. The film also earned $155 million at the international box office. Dreamgirls also received a number of accolades, including three awards at the 64th Golden Globe Awards ceremony, including the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, and two Oscars at the 79th Academy Awards.

List of apocalyptic films

This is a list of apocalyptic feature-length films. All films within this list feature either the end of the world, a prelude to such an end (such as a world taken over by a viral infection), and/or a post-apocalyptic setting.

List of fictional presidents of the United States (C–D)

The following is a list of fictional United States presidents, C through D.

List of films based on actual events

This is a list of feature films that are based on actual events.

Not all movies have remained true to the genuine history of the event or the characters they are portraying, often adding action and drama to increase the substance and popularity of the movie. True story movies gained popularity in the late 1980s and early 1990s with the production of movies based on actual events that first aired on CBS, ABC, and NBC. The Movies Based on True Stories Database by Traciy Curry-Reyes was the first to compile a list of movies based on true stories and was the first site to coin the term "movies based on true stories" in the 1990s. This list should only include movies supported by a Wikipedia article.

Meat pie Western

Meat pie Western, also known as Australian Western or kangaroo Western, is a broad genre of Western-style films or TV series set in the Australian outback or "the bush". Films about bushrangers (sometimes called bushranger films) are included in this genre. Some films categorised as meat-pie or Australian Westerns also fulfil the criteria for other genres, such as drama, revisionist Western, crime or thriller.

The term "meat pie Western" is a play on the term Spaghetti Western, used for Italian-made Westerns, relating in both cases to foods are regarded as national dishes.

Nomen à clef

In romance languages, nomen à clef or nomen à clé ([nomen‿a kle], French for "name with a key"), is a name describing a real person, behind a façade of fiction. "Key" in this context means a table one can use to swap out the names.

It is the nomenclature complement of the roman à clef.

Opera film

An opera film is a recording of an opera on film.

Primary Colors (film)

Primary Colors is a 1998 American comedy-drama film directed by Mike Nichols. The screenplay by Elaine May was adapted from the novel Primary Colors: A Novel of Politics, a roman à clef about Bill Clinton's first presidential campaign in 1992, which was originally published anonymously, but in 1996 was revealed to have been written by journalist Joe Klein, who had been covering Clinton's campaign for Newsweek. The film starred John Travolta, Emma Thompson, Billy Bob Thornton, Kathy Bates, Maura Tierney, Larry Hagman and Adrian Lester.

It was critically acclaimed but was a box office bomb, earning $52 million from a $65 million budget. Bates was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance, and May was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Roman à clef

Roman à clef (French pronunciation: ​[ʁɔmɑ̃n‿a kle], anglicised as ), French for novel with a key, is a novel about real life, overlaid with a façade of fiction. The fictitious names in the novel represent real people, and the "key" is the relationship between the nonfiction and the fiction. The "key" may be produced separately by the author or implied through the use of epigraphs or other literary techniques.Created by Madeleine de Scudéry in the 17th century to provide a forum for her thinly-veiled fiction featuring political and public figures, the roman à clef has since been used by writers including Sylvia Plath, John Banville, Truman Capote, Simone de Beauvoir, Ernest Hemingway, George Orwell, Jack Kerouac, Victor Hugo, Blaise Cendrars, Philip K. Dick, Bret Easton Ellis, Jay McInerney, Naguib Mahfouz, John McGahern, Charles Bukowski, Malachi Martin, Saul Bellow, Hunter S. Thompson, James Joyce, and Djuna Barnes.

The reasons an author might choose the roman à clef format include satire; writing about controversial topics and/or reporting inside information on scandals without giving rise to charges of libel; the opportunity to turn the tale the way the author would like it to have gone; the opportunity to portray personal, autobiographical experiences without having to expose the author as the subject; avoiding self-incrimination or incrimination of others that could be used as evidence in civil, criminal, or disciplinary proceedings; and the settling of scores.

Biographically inspired works have also appeared in other literary genres and art forms, notably the film à clef.

Romanian New Wave

The Romanian New Wave (Romanian: Noul val românesc) is a genre of realist and often minimalist films made in Romania since the mid-aughts, starting with two award-winning shorts by two Romanian directors, namely Cristi Puiu's Cigarettes and Coffee, which won the Short Film Golden Bear at the 2004 Berlin International Film Festival, and Cătălin Mitulescu's Trafic, which won the Short Film Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival later that same year.

Silent film

A silent film is a film with no synchronized recorded sound (and in particular, no audible dialogue). In silent films for entertainment, the plot may be conveyed by the use of title cards, written indications of the plot and key dialogue lines. The idea of combining motion pictures with recorded sound is nearly as old as film itself, but because of the technical challenges involved, the introduction of synchronized dialogue became practical only in the late 1920s with the perfection of the Audion amplifier tube and the advent of the Vitaphone system. The term "silent film" is a misnomer, as these films were almost always accompanied by live sounds. During the silent-film era that existed from the mid-1890s to the late 1920s, a pianist, theater organist—or even, in large cities, a small orchestra—would often play music to accompany the films. Pianists and organists would play either from sheet music, or improvisation. Sometimes a person would even narrate the intertitle cards for the audience. Though at the time the technology to synchronize sound with the video did not exist, music was seen as an essential part of the viewing experience.

The term silent film is a retronym—a term created to retroactively distinguish something. Early sound films, starting with The Jazz Singer in 1927, were variously referred to as the "talkies," "sound films," or "talking pictures." Within a decade, the widespread production of silent films for popular entertainment had ceased, and the industry had moved fully into the sound era, in which movies were accompanied by synchronized sound recordings of spoken dialogue, music and sound effects.

Most early motion pictures are considered lost because the nitrate film used in that era was extremely unstable and flammable. Additionally, many films were deliberately destroyed because they had little value in the era before home video. It has often been claimed that around 75 percent of silent films have been lost, though these estimates may be inaccurate due to a lack of numerical data.

Veronica Guerin (film)

Veronica Guerin is a 2003 American-Irish-British biographical crime film directed by Joel Schumacher and starring Cate Blanchett in the title role. The screenplay by Carol Doyle and Mary Agnes Donoghue focuses on Irish journalist Veronica Guerin, whose investigation into the drug trade in Dublin led to her murder in 1996, at the age of 37. The film is the second to be inspired by Guerin's life. Three years earlier, When the Sky Falls centred on the same story, although the names of the real-life characters were changed.

When the Sky Falls

When the Sky Falls is a 2000 film à clef directed by John Mackenzie and starring Joan Allen. The story is based on that of Veronica Guerin, a crime reporter writing about drugs for the Sunday Independent, her investigations and murder.

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