File 770

File 770 is a long-running science fiction fanzine, newszine, and blog site published/administered by Mike Glyer. It is named after the legendary room party held in Room 770 at Nolacon, the 9th World Science Fiction Convention in New Orleans, Louisiana, that upstaged the other events at the 1951 Worldcon.[1]

Glyer started File 770 in 1978 as a mimeographed print fanzine to report on fan clubs, conventions, fannish projects, fans, fanzines and sf awards, and to publish controversial articles.[2] In the 1990s, Glyer moved production of the fanzine to computer desktop publishing, and on January 15, 2008, he began publishing File 770 as a blog on the internet.[3]

File 770 has won the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine seven times, in 1984,[4] 1985,[5] 1989,[6] 2000,[7] 2001,[8] 2008,[9] and 2016.[10] In 1984[4] and again in 2016[10] both File 770 and its owner/editor Mike Glyer won Hugo Awards (the latter the Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer).

A print version of File 770 has been produced every year from 1978 to the present. eFanzines.com began hosting PDF versions of the paper issues in 2005.[3] While File 770 remains a traditional paper fanzine published once or twice a year, much additional news and expanded content is available daily in its on-line blog site version edited by Glyer.

File 770
EditorMike Glyer
Frequency
  • Daily (online)
  • Biannually (print)
Format
FounderMike Glyer
First issue1978
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Websitefile770.com

References

  1. ^ Cameron, Richard Graeme. "R: Room 770". The Canadian Fancyclopedia. British Columbia Science Fiction Association. Archived from the original on June 11, 2007. Retrieved September 8, 2010. This was a St. Charles Hotel room registered to fans Max Keasler, Roger Sims, Rich Elsberry and Ed Kuss at the 9th Worldcon -- nicknamed NOLacon -- held in New Orleans in 1951. Frank Dietz had been hosting a room party which was asked to quiet down by a hotel detective, and Dietz resolved the matter by taking everyone to room 770 circa 11:00 PM Saturday night, whereupon a massive party developed which lasted till 11:00 AM the next morning. [...] Time has transformed the room 770 party into an iconic fannish emblem, but the truth is it did have a pervasive impact on fandom right from the beginning, it was an instant legend in the making. [...] Room 770 played a part in the philosophy and orientation of a substantial part of fandom for years thereafter". So much so that Mike Glyer chose it as the title for his newszine, presumably because it strikes the right note of fannish fun. - Harry Warner, Jr.
  2. ^ "Is Your Club Dead Yet?". File 770 (127). November 1998. Archived from the original on July 6, 2008.
  3. ^ a b "About File770.com". Mike Glyer. Retrieved 2017-01-16.
  4. ^ a b "1984 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  5. ^ "1985 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  6. ^ "1989 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  7. ^ "2000 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  8. ^ "2001 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  9. ^ "2008 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  10. ^ a b "2016 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved 2017-01-16.

External links

47th World Science Fiction Convention

The 47th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Noreascon 3 (or "... Three", or "... III"), was held August 31–September 4, 1989, at the Sheraton-Boston Hotel, Hilton Hotel, Boston Park Plaza, and the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts, United States.The chairman was Mark L. Olson. The Guests of Honor were Andre Norton, Ian & Betty Ballantine (pro), and The Stranger Club (fan). Seven surviving members of the latter group—the first known science fiction club in the Boston area, and responsible for organizing Boskone I, New England's first science fiction convention, in 1941—attended, including Harry Stubbs (Hal Clement). Total attendance was 6,837, of 7,795 paid memberships.

70th World Science Fiction Convention

The 70th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Chicon 7, was held in Chicago, Illinois, August 30-September 3, 2012, at the Hyatt Regency Chicago. The convention committee was chaired by Dave McCarty and organized under the auspices of the Chicago Worldcon Bid corporation.

71st World Science Fiction Convention

The 71st World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as LoneStarCon 3, was held in San Antonio, Texas, on August 29-September 2, 2013, at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center and Marriott Rivercenter. The convention committee was chaired by Randall Shepherd. The convention was organized by Alamo Literary Arts Maintenance Organization, Inc. (ALAMO) which had previously organized LoneStarCon 2, the 55th World Science Fiction Convention, held in San Antonio in 1997.

72nd World Science Fiction Convention

The 72nd World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Loncon 3, was held 14–18 August 2014 at ExCeL London in London, England. The convention committee was co-chaired by Alice Lawson and Steve Cooper and organized as London 2014 Limited. Loncon 3 sold the most memberships (10,833) and had the second largest in-person attendance (7,951) of any Worldcon to date.

73rd World Science Fiction Convention

The 73rd World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Sasquan, was held on August 19–23, 2015, at the Spokane Convention Center in Spokane, Washington. This location was selected on August 31, 2013, by the members of the 71st World Science Fiction Convention in San Antonio, Texas. The convention was chaired by Sally Woehrle.

74th World Science Fiction Convention

The 74th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as MidAmeriCon II, was held August 17–21, 2016, at the Bartle Hall Convention Center in downtown, Kansas City, Missouri. Its location was selected on August 17, 2014 by the members of the 72nd World Science Fiction Convention in London.

The convention was organized by Mid American Science Fiction and Fantasy Conventions, Inc., and was chaired by Ruth Lichtwardt and co-chaired by Diane Lacey. The convention's name, by established Worldcon tradition, follows after the first MidAmeriCon, the 34th World Science Fiction Convention, held in Kansas City in 1976.

9th World Science Fiction Convention

The 9th World Science Fiction Convention, also known as Nolacon I, was held 1–3 September 1951 at the St. Charles Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States.

The chairman was Harry B. Moore.

The guest of honor was Fritz Leiber.

Total attendance was approximately 190. The at-the-door membership price was US$1, the same price charged from the 1st through the 12th Worldcon

Other pros attending included Robert Bloch, Fredric Brown, Judith Merril, E.E. Smith, L. Sprague de Camp, editor John W. Campbell and fantasy artist Hannes Bok, who did Nolacon's program book cover. Famous fans present included Sam Moskowitz, Wilson Tucker (aka Bob Tucker), Dave Kyle, Roger Sims, Terry Carr, and Lee Hoffman. The latter, editor of the very popular fanzine Quandry, whom everyone assumed was male, turned out to be a young woman, a ‘revelation’ which greatly startled even those who had corresponded with her.

Notable events included world premiere screenings of The Day The Earth Stood Still and When Worlds Collide, plus a continuous two-day-long party in Room 770 at the St. Charles Hotel that became legendary following the convention not only for its duration but for its high quality. Mike Glyer's long-running newszine File 770, named in commemoration of this party, has won the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine a number of times.Hugo Awards were not presented at this Worldcon as the awards were not proposed until the following year, 1952, with the first Hugos actually presented in 1953 at the 11th World Science Fiction Convention. However, in 2001 at the 59th World Science Fiction Convention held in Philadelphia, a set of Retro Hugo Awards were presented to honor work that would have been Hugo-eligible had the award existed in 1951. A "Certificate of Merit" was presented to representatives of The Day the Earth Stood Still by the Nolacon I chairman, and this was reported on Movietone News at the time.

DeepSouthCon

The DeepSouthCon (DSC) is an annual science fiction convention, which is hosted in different cities in the Southern United States. Site selection is by vote of the membership of a given DSC, for the convention to be held 2 years in the future. DSC is often, but not always, held in conjunction with an existing annual convention so the time of year varies. Many regular attendees of DeepSouthCon are also members of the Southern Fandom Confederation, but there is no direct relationship between the two organizations.

Detcon1

Detcon1 was the 11th occasional North American Science Fiction Convention (NASFiC). It was held in Detroit, Michigan, from July 17–20, 2014, in the Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center. This NASFiC was scheduled because London, England, was selected as the location for the 2014 World Science Fiction Convention.

Don Markstein's Toonopedia

Don Markstein's Toonopedia (subtitled A Vast Repository of Toonological Knowledge) is a web encyclopedia of print cartoons, comic strips and animation, initiated February 13, 2001. Donald D. Markstein, the sole writer and editor of Toonopedia, termed it "the world's first hypertext encyclopedia of toons" and stated, "The basic idea is to cover the entire spectrum of American cartoonery."

Markstein began the project during 1999 with several earlier titles: he changed Don's Cartoon Encyberpedia (1999) to Don Markstein's Cartoonopedia (2000) after learning the word "Encyberpedia" had been trademarked. During 2001, he settled on his final title, noting, "Decided (after thinking about it for several weeks) to change the name of the site to Don Markstein's Toonopedia, rather than Cartoonopedia. Better rhythm in the name, plus 'toon' is probably a more apt word, in modern parlance, than 'cartoon', for what I'm doing.

EFanzines

The single largest online distribution point for science fiction fanzines, eFanzines was launched by Bill Burns on 7 December 2000 and recorded its 500,000th visit in December 2008. It was nominated for a Hugo Award for "best web site" in 2005, one of only two occasions that category has appeared on the ballot.

Hundreds of British and American fanzines are now available to read or download for free, including Mike Glyer's long-running sf newsletter File 770 (six-time Hugo winner), Peter Weston's Nova-winning Prolapse (recently retitled Relapse), Bruce Gillespie's Hugo-nominated and Ditmar-winning critical journal SF Commentary and editions of the digital amateur press association e-APA.

As well as an extensive gallery of British science fiction convention badges and other British fanhistorical pages, the site also includes links to dozens of related archives and other online fanzines.

First Fandom Hall of Fame award

First Fandom Hall of Fame is an annual award for contributions to the field of science fiction dating back more than 30 years. Contributions can be as a fan, writer, editor, artist, agent, or any combination of the five. It is awarded by First Fandom and is usually presented at the beginning of the World Science Fiction Convention's Hugo Award ceremony.

Holier Than Thou (fanzine)

Holier Than Thou was a science fiction fanzine edited by Marty Cantor and Robbie Cantor. It was nominated for the 1984, 1985 and 1986 Hugo Awards for Best Fanzine, losing in the first two years to File 770 and in the last to Lan's Lantern.

Hugo Award for Best Fanzine

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Fanzine is given each year for non professionally edited magazines, or "fanzines", related to science fiction or fantasy which has published four or more issues with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year. Awards were also once given out for professional magazines in the professional magazine category, and since 1984 have been awarded for semi-professional magazines in the semiprozine category; several magazines that were nominated for or won the fanzine category have gone on to be nominated for or win the semiprozine category since it was established.

The award was first presented in 1955, and has been given annually since except for in 1958. A "fanzine" is defined for the award as a magazine that does not meet the Hugo award's criteria for a professional or semi-professional magazine. Specifically, it must meet less than two of the five Hugo criteria for consideration as a semiprozine: that the magazine had an average press run of at least one thousand copies per issue, paid its contributors and/or staff in other than copies of the publication, provided at least half the income of any one person, had at least fifteen percent of its total space occupied by advertising, and announced itself to be a semiprozine. This is the oldest long-running Hugo award for fan activity; in 1967 Hugo Awards were added specifically for fan writing and fan art. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1939, 1941, 1946, 1951, and 1954, and the fanzine category has been included each year.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The works on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. The 1955 and 1956 awards did not include any recognition of runner-up magazines, but since 1957 all of the candidates were recorded. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year.During the 69 nomination years, including Retro Hugo years, 128 magazines run by 177 editors have been nominated. Of these, 40 magazines run by 67 editors have won, including ties. Locus has won 8 times out of 13 nominations, the most wins of any magazine. File 770 has won 7 of 31, the most nominations of any magazine. Mimosa has won 6 of 14 nominations, Ansible has won 5 out of 11, and Science Fiction Review has won 4 of 12; they are the only other magazines to win more than twice. Challenger has the most nominations without winning at 12; the next highest is FOSFAX with 7. As editor of Locus Charles N. Brown has won 8 of 13 nominations, though he shared 8 of those awards with Dena Brown. Richard E. Geis has won 6 of 15 nominations for his work on Science Fiction Review, Psychotic, and The Alien Critic; Mike Glyer has won 7 of 31 for editing File 770; David Langford has won 5 of 12 for work on Ansible and Twil-Ddu; and Richard Lynch and Nicki Lynch have both won 6 of 14 nominations for Mimosa. Guy H. Lillian III has the most nominations without winning at 12 for Challenger.

Mike Glyer

Mike Glyer (born 16 February 1953) is both the editor and publisher of the long-running science fiction fan newszine File 770. He has won the Hugo Award 11 times in two categories: File 770 won the Best Fanzine Hugo in 1984, 1985, 1989, 2000, 2001 2008, and 2016. Glyer won the Best Fan Writer Hugo in 1984, 1986, 1988, and 2016. The 1982 World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) committee presented Glyer a special award in 1982 for "Keeping the Fan in Fanzine Publishing."

Phoenix Award (science fiction)

The Phoenix Award is a lifetime achievement award for a science fiction professional "who has done a great deal for Southern Fandom." The Phoenix is given annually by DeepSouthCon, a bidded convention held in different states of the former Confederacy.There is no standard shape or image for the Phoenix as each host convention creates their own unique interpretation of the award. The Phoenix is presented in conjunction with Rebel Award for a science fiction fan meeting similar criteria. The award recipients are chosen by the host convention.

Rebel Award

The Rebel Award is a lifetime achievement award for a science fiction fan "who has done a great deal for Southern Fandom." The Rebel is given annually by DeepSouthCon, a bidded convention held in different states of the former Confederacy.There is no standard shape or image for the Rebel as each host convention creates their own unique interpretation of the award. The Rebel is presented in conjunction with Phoenix Award for a science fiction professional (author, artist, editor, etc.) meeting similar criteria. The award recipients are chosen by the host convention.

SMOFcon

SMOFcon is an annual convention that focuses on the organisation of science fiction conventions. The first SMOFcon took place in 1984, and most have taken place in the United States.

SMOFcon typically attracts 100-150 attendees, and usually occurs in the first weekend of December, though other dates have been known. The content includes formal and informal sessions covering insights from events held in the previous year, information about the latest trends from the community and external experts, reviews of previous events and feedback to bidders for upcoming events, with a focus on learnings that can be widely shared.

A significant number of SMOFcon attendees are also Worldcon organisers and the programme usually includes sessions about the most recent Worldcon and on bids for future Worldcons.

The name of the convention is derived from the word SMOF (also spelled smof), which is an acronym which stands for "Secret Master(s) Of Fandom" and is a term used within the science fiction fan community. Its coining is generally attributed to science fiction author Jack L. Chalker.

Sidewise Award for Alternate History

The Sidewise Awards for Alternate History were established in 1995 to recognize the best alternative history stories and novels of the year.

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